Palestine Papers Source Outs Himself

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ziyad clot steve clemons.jpgZiyad Clot, a French lawyer who advised the Palestinian side in negotiatios with Israel during the Annapolis effort, has announced himself as the whistle-blower and source of the highly controversial “Palestine Papers.”
He reports today at Al Jazeera why he did it. This shows that former lead negoatiater Saeb Erekat was wrong about the source of the papers when he accused Al Jazeera Transparency Project chief Clayton Swisher of being a CIA agent who orchestrated this. Erekat recently retracted the charges against Swisher, who is author and editor of a book release this week titled The Palestine Papers: The End of the Road?.
A clip of Ziyad Clot’s statement which should be read in full:
palestine papers.jpg

The “peace negotiations” were a deceptive farce, whereby biased terms were unilaterally imposed by Israel and systematically endorsed by the US and EU capitals. Far from enabling a negotiated fair end of the conflict, the pursuit of the Oslo process has deepened Israeli segregationist policies and justified the tightening of the security control imposed on the Palestinian population as well as its geographical fragmentation.
Far for preserving the land on which to build a State, it has tolerated the intensification of the colonisation of the Palestinian territory. Far from maintaining a national cohesion, the process I participated in, albeit briefly, proved to be instrumental in creating and aggravating divisions amongst Palestinians. In its most recent developments, it became a cruel enterprise from which the Palestinians of Gaza have suffered the most. Last but not least, these negotiations excluded for the most part the great majority of the Palestinian people: the 7 million-Palestinian refugees. My experience over those 11 months spent in Ramallah confirms in fact that the PLO, given its structure, was not in a position to represent all Palestinian rights and interests.
After I resigned, I believed I had a duty to inform the public of the most alarming developments of the Israeli-Palestinian talks. These talks were unfair, misleading and became unsustainable.
Tragically, the Palestinians were left uninformed of the fate of their individual and collective rights in the negotiations and their divided political leaderships were not held accountable for their decisions or inaction.

This account reinforces for me why I believe that ultimately neither the Palestinian nor the Israeli political system can bear the stress of making constructive compromises leading to a two-state solution. Sitting both parties in the room and pushing them to work toward compromise is folly.
A structure of stakeholders that shoves the parties forward, with them reluctant but ultimately agreeing, is the only way I feel that a stable two-state producing equilibrium can be reached.
— Steve Clemons

Comments

33 comments on “Palestine Papers Source Outs Himself

  1. Kathleen Grasso Andersen says:

    Since it was a UN Resolution which created Israel in Palestine’s midst, it is the repsonsibility of the UN and its member nations, to insure that Palestine’s borders, as per that resolution, be honored. The US, while not an actual stakeholder, has been commandeering the process and exerting its ifluence unevenly in favor of Israel….until we and all the member nations of the UN value Palestinian rights equally to the security issues of Isreal, there will be no peaceful solution.
    The pomp and farce surrounding our involvement in the Palestine/Israel debacle is staggeringly astounding.
    The Emporer has no scruuuuppppples and the Fisherman’s Wife had better know when to say “When” in Palestine.

    Reply

  2. Continental Op says:

    This account reinforces for me why I believe that ultimately neither the Palestinian nor the Israeli political system can bear the stress of making constructive compromises leading to a two-state solution.
    You are correct.
    A structure of stakeholders that shoves the parties forward, with them reluctant but ultimately agreeing, is the only way I feel that a stable two-state producing equilibrium can be reached.
    I’m afraid I disagree. The two state solution is as dead as Monty Python’s parrot. The fact that the alternatives to the two state solution range from horrible to difficult doesn’t bring the parrot back to life.
    Israel will remain an apartheid state for the next generation. The question is what kind of state will replace the apartheid state, and how do we get there.

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  3. Matthew says:

    “America is losing the ability to shape events in the Middle East.”
    Those may be the most beautiful words in the English language.

    Reply

  4. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “Sore”, they may well be, but worried??? Not so much. I suggest you pay careful attention to the NYT op-ed page in the coming days. Guaranteed, either Oren or Dershowitz will sound off with a forceful rebuttal that will bend the facts, cast Israel as a victim, and the “exchange” will end there, without a pro-Palestinian rebuttal.
    Netanyahu has no worries about the UN giving the Palestinians a state. He holds all the cards, and has Obama by the nuts. Obama has no power on this issue, and even if he did, he hasn’t the courage to wield it. He’d have to fight a fight with his own party, and he’s already shown us he is too lacking in backbone to take on such a battle.
    I wonder if Hillary and Bibi are goin’ to get together for dinner or a glass of wine. Perhaps they can share a chuckle at Obama’s expense.

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  5. DonS says:

    Uh oh, Bibi and AIPAC are really going to be sore now. NYT gives prime op ed space to Mahmoud Abba, and he doesn’t sould like a fire breathing dragon.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/17/opinion/17abbas.html?hp

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  6. DakotabornKansan says:

    Obama is giving a Middle East speech and Netanyahu speaks to Congress the day after. Obama will also address the annual AIPAC policy conference this weekend.
    A good time to review John Mearsheimer and Stephen Walt

    Reply

  7. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Dang, ya gotta love that Pepe Escobar, doncha???
    http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Middle_East/ME17Ak01.html
    Excerpt…..
    The – reflexive – Israeli solution in times of trouble is to launch another war; until recently, it would be simultaneously on Lebanon and on Gaza, as revealed earlier this year by WikiLeaks cables published by the Norwegian newspaper Aftenpost. In practice this would be a total war on civilians, as in “Israel cannot accept any restrictions on warfare in urban areas”. All “collateral damage” would be of course “unintentional”. That was a startling case of the Israeli military announcing in advance its plans to commit a war crime.”
    “So the question the whole world is asking is inevitable; what’s wrong with these people?”

    Reply

  8. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “But no time at all before the media frames the issue in terms of blame Syria, blame Iran. Israel and AIPAC will pull out all stops to keep it framed this way; with a little help from the Congress, the administration, DOS, etc. How stupid do they think we are” — DonS
    http://news.antiwar.com/2011/05/15/nakba-killings-israeli-envoys-told-to-blame-syria/

    Reply

  9. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Not that it matters or anything, but the Israeli jackboots just shot another American citizen in the head with a tear gas cannister.
    His egregious crime was to dare film a nonviolent protest against the separation fence in the West Bank.
    Just so you know, his name is Christopher Whitman. I only mention it because its doubtful you’ll hear it on MSNBC, CNN, or Fox News. (You know what they say about “the hand that feeds you”).
    And I’m sure that Obama and Clinton have better things to do than deal with such a trivial matter as a foreign government shooting another legally engaged American citizen in the head.
    It remains to be seen whether Mr.Clemons thinks that THREE such incidents warrant a whisper or two. Or are we just concerned about how MUSLIM governments treat peaceful protesters?????
    Tristan Anderson.
    Emily Henochowitzc.
    Christopher Whitman.
    Abandoned and betrayed by their own government.

    Reply

  10. Cee says:

    What silent communion this scene holds,
    Of a life lived and one yet to unfold;
    What forlorn love those encircling arms portend,
    That would protect against the evils that descend
    From unseen missiles yet to come with unlived years,
    Where hopes and dreams dissolve into unforeseen fears
    That falls like a funeral pall upon this child,
    Who sits so quiet, so pensive, so mild
    Beneath those crescent arms as they reach to shield
    This innocent lost in this barren field.
    What catastrophe is caught in this aged face,
    What last years lost in silent disgrace,
    What father is now absent from this scene,
    What mother abandoned to a fate unseen?
    How relive a life lost, what might have been?
    How rekindle love in a world of sin?
    How undo the infectious toxin of hate?
    How understand the true terror of fate?
    I share this tent of sorrow and of shame,
    The darkness in the soul, the guilt and blame,
    A seared image of suffering and pain

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  11. DonS says:

    So there’s Obama, siting in the Oval office with Bibi. Does he just sit there and let Bibi stew and finally say, ‘like, hey man, you need to get your shit together’. Or does he listen to Bibi’s reading him the riot act, then assuring Bibi he can count on the US special relationship, blah, blah.
    Reading Krugman this morning, and analogizing Obama’s unfathomable willingness to let the Tea Party dictate the terms of the debt ceiling debacle, it’s hard to have even a smidge of belief that Obama will advance the cause of sanity in I/P one bit.
    [for those interested, the Krugman column, with the line that suggested the analogy . . . “But the president can

    Reply

  12. Carroll says:

    The ONLY way I/P can be settled in a way that produces 2 states and ends once and for all the major parts of the conflict is by INTERNATIONAL LAW.
    All this dicking and screwing around is exactly what most of us and Ziyad Clot say it is….nothing…a stall to give Israel time to absorb all of Palestine…a joke.
    The “stakeholders’ are the last ones who could ever settle this.
    A solution has to be “imposed”.
    And the justification for an outside party to “impose it” is letting universally recognized (except by the US & Israel obviously) international law be the “decider”.

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  13. DonS says:

    It was only a matter of time before the Arab Spring would involve I/P. But no time at all before the media frames the issue in terms of blame Syria, blame Iran. Israel and AIPAC will pull out all stops to keep it framed this way; with a little help from the Congress, the administration, DOS, etc. How stupid do they think we are? Sadly, I think we know the answer.

    Reply

  14. Paul Norheim says:

    Peter Beinart on The Daily Beast:
    “Why did thousands of Palestinians yesterday converge upon Israel

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  15. Arun Gupta says:

    This is what I was referring to: Anatol Lieven: “As I have written, I

    Reply

  16. Arun Gupta says:

    Anatol Lieven is a fellow of the New America Foundation, and you expect the Foundation to be taken seriously? It will not be by anyone who has ties with India.

    Reply

  17. PissedOffAmerican says:

    A meltdown at Unit 1, Unit 4 leaning and facing possible collapse, several units contaminating ground water, and area school children outside the exclusion zone receiving adult occupational radiation doses………
    An entire hour of a CNN “news” broadcast, from 7:00 pm PST to 8:00, and the GLOBAL nuclear catastrophe unfolding at Daiichi received nary a mention.
    At what cost will our media’s prostitution to special interests be realized and halted?? With the deaths of millions, who died for want of the truth? The NRC said that it was IMPOSSIBLE for even ONE reactor containment vessel to be breached. THREE are breached in Japan. When our own regulatory agency can be so subservient to the industry it is tasked to regulate, what hope have we of our domestic nuclear plants being subject to prudent safety measures and procedures that may affect their bottom line? We are to trust the NRC’s assertions about the safety of our own plants when they have been so WRONG, and DISHONEST, about what is occurring in Japan?
    Nature’s clock is tick-tocking forward to the next inevitable major quake on the West Coast. Not IF, but WHEN.
    San Onofre and Diablo are the REAL monsters lurking under your beds. Next to those two, Al Qaeda is but a gnat.

    Reply

  18. questions says:

    This is pretty informative, if a few days old.
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/12/us-japan-nuclear-reactor-idUSTRE74B1H520110512
    and this one, also grabbed from BNC:
    http://atomicpowerreview.blogspot.com/2011/05/fukushima-daiichi-no-1-core-melt-exit.html
    There is still uncertainty, but it is tilting towards worse rather than not, and the suggestion of concrete entombment of a massive, tall, wide, and deep sort seems more rather than less likely.
    The diarist, nathguy, over at kos has been on the very pessimistic side of things from the get-go, and perhaps he had a point all along. Worth the search for the day’s news. Also contains a fair number of links for anyone who wants to follow the issue.
    ****
    And meanwhile, the Nakhba/founding day is being portrayed by the NYT as an exercise in profound and justified paranoia for Israel. On 4 sides besieged. Egypt stopped its protesters. Israel fired a lot of bullets into a lot of crowds. Arab Spring has a lot of energy and youth, though. There needs to be some thinking.
    Sometimes the most rational local action is the worst for your longterm good. Didn’t someone already figure this out at some point? We get into all sorts of collective action and coordination disasters by doing what is individually good and more broadly disserving.
    Well, perhaps things will calm down again in a day or two, and perhaps Netanyahu will figure out a way to disengage a bit. Hmmm. What are the chances he’s gone full Tea Party and has no room left to move?
    (Note that Gingrich is going after Ryan. Gingrich, to the left of Ryan. Fascinating. Policy entrepreneurs will find spaces when they are desperate.)

    Reply

  19. questions says:

    POA,
    Scroll down to 13 May 2011 for the start of relevant Fukushima comments. Yes, pro-nuke site, but these comments are not celebrating anything. Lots of links. Lots of very grim news, much of it dating back to the earthquake, apparently. So all the “no damage til the tsunami” stuff was either deliberately cya or was unknowingly wrong. Either way, there’s much to be concerned about.
    http://bravenewclimate.com/2011/04/23/fukushima-open-thread-5/#comments

    Reply

  20. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Meanwhile, the unfolding nuclear nightmare in Japan, that has dire global imnplications, enjoys a near complete media blackout.
    Does anyone really think that the spectre of Japanese government and industry officials resigning, in tears, doesn’t send us a message about the scale of this catastrophe? Reactor 1 in a full meltdown, Reactor 4 leaning and in danger of collapse, huge amounts of radiation entering the sea, seaweed contaminated forty miles from the plant, groundwater contaminated at unprecedented levels, evacuations expanding and continuing, Reactor 1 in danger of exploding if cooling efforts are instituted.
    Think about it. They can’t cool this thing down. If rods are scattered around due to the past explosion, as many believe, you cannot EVER access the site. NEVER.
    Meanwhile, every industry favoring bit of BULLSHIT the NRC and the EPA has fed us about this catastrophe has been proven to be CRAP. The last major public announcement I paid attention to from the NRC stated that the situation at Daiichi “won’t get worse”. That was weeks ago. And, uh, guess what? It gets worse on a daily basis.
    One can only assume that our governments, science communities, and industry experts are at a complete and utter loss as to how to put an end to this unfolding calamity, hence the media silence is an effort to forestall widespread public outcry.
    It would not suprise me at all if mankind is about to be distracted away from its endless effort to bomb each other into oblivion, as we might finally find ourselves united globally in sharing a common threat. The question is, do we have the will, or the means, to achieve victory?
    We shall see.

    Reply

  21. brigid says:

    Steve, your observation may be right on target. Please flesh it out by describing in more detail how this new structural approach might work. And now it might be legitimized perhaps through a Palestinian/ Israeli referendum process.

    Reply

  22. Chumanist says:

    The international peace community cannot support the devil’s advocacy of hiring a private- proxy military force like Blackwater whose activities have been against all norms and standards that set the rules of international law.

    Reply

  23. Paul Norheim says:

    Well, when Washington doesn’t screw up in the Middle East, we can always rely on Blackwater (aka Reflex Responses)
    and Erik Prince:
    “Mr. Prince (…) was hired by the crown prince of Abu Dhabi to put together an 800-member battalion of foreign troops
    for the U.A.E., according to former employees on the project, American officials and corporate documents obtained by
    The New York Times.
    The force is intended to conduct special operations missions inside and outside the country, defend oil pipelines and
    skyscrapers from terrorist attacks and put down internal revolts, the documents show. Such troops could be deployed if
    the Emirates faced unrest or were challenged by pro-democracy demonstrations in its crowded labor camps or
    democracy protests like those sweeping the Arab world this year. (…)
    In outsourcing critical parts of their defense to mercenaries

    Reply

  24. PissedOffAmerican says:

    I listened to an NPR interview with Michael Oren last week.
    Seems the thrust of the topic was the dynamics between our relationship with Israel, and, as usual, all the great lengths Israel is going to in an attempt to bring those nasty heathen Palestinians to heel long enough for peace to spring forth due to the gracious hearts of the saintly God-fearing Israelis.
    The word “settlement” did not appear during the course of the interview.
    Nor did the interviewer see fit to ask Oren when Israel planned to stop shooting American citizens in the head when they attend peaceful protests.
    There were inexplicable pauses in the interview. It occurred to me that that might be the time it took for Oren to hand the mic down to the interviewer, who was undoubtedly pleasantly distracted with a task other than that of conducting the unexciting interview.

    Reply

  25. JohnH says:

    Ziyad Clot merely confirms what we already knew–peace processing is a sham. The two state solution is dead. Now it’s time to grant Palestinians full economic and civil rights…just as Hillary demands that Iran do for its citizens.
    Steve’s “stakeholders” refer presumably to those who actually rule Israel–military officers and cabinet members, 12-18 uber-wealthy capitalists, some orthodox rabbis, and some senior bureaucrats.
    http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3452359,00.html
    Or maybe Steve includes the likes of Sheldon Adelson, Haim Saban, and Abe Foxman, rabid Zionists all.
    In any case, it’s hard to see that there’s much to work with on the Israeli side.
    As for the “international community,” those phony champions of freedom, democracy and human rights, they have shown themselves to be less than worthless as a constructive force in the Middle East.

    Reply

  26. Warren Metzler says:

    I object to Steve’s analysis. A stakeholder is a person who is personally involved in a situation. And therefore the only stakeholders in Israel / Palestine are the Israelis and Palestinians. The US is not now, never was, and never will be a stakeholder in this, except in the imaginations of Foggy Bottom residents who mistakenly believe they are rulers of the universe, and the civilians who support those State Department types.
    There is only one valid view of a country. Which is a geographic location in which ALL the inhabitants have all the rights that God assigned each human enshrined in law and provided; rights like free speech, free movement, free (and honest) elections, no discrimination, and so forth.
    Any country, such as Israel or any of the Arab dictatorships, who act in opposition to this natural law have a finite life expectancy. Which since the Arab Spring appears to be sooner than latter. What will produce change is a multitude of Palestinian and their Arab brothers and sisters, coupled with enlightened Israelis compatriots, repeatedly Tahririzing the Israeli government. And in time, as with the IRA and the Northern Ireland English fans, all will realize peace in an multicultural environment is the only viable option.
    It has been a serious error for US officials to believe they could midwife this, and they should have kept to the sidelines, allowing the average Palestinian, Israeli, and Arab to grow up and get this. Of course the US government could have done its share by not being a money and power drug dealer for Israel, but that might be too much for the typical Washington government and big business type.

    Reply

  27. DonS says:

    Af/Pak
    Richard Holbroke reflections, per his widow, Kati Marton,
    “There are structural similarities between Afghanistan and Vietnam,

    Reply

  28. questions says:

    Sand, sorry, didn’t get the reference at first. My mistake! Two meanings of “questions”. Oh well.

    Reply

  29. questions says:

    Structural issues in US politics, as noted above, refers to the fact that the party and individual members of the party have interests in common and tensions.
    The Republican Party is a brand name. Ron Paul, or Sarah Palin or whoever, uses that brand name to position for election or fame. In the process of using the brand name, each actor helps define the brand. If the brand doesn’t thrive, then the individual actors also don’t thrive, but if the individual actors don’t attempt to shape the brand, they end up sacrificing themselves in various ways.
    There is, then, a mutual dependence that the brand name or group has with regard to the individuals who carry on the brand name. They need each other, each wants to tell the other what to do, and yet each depends on the other. There is no “Republican Party” without individual Republicans, and there are no individual Republicans without the party apparatus.
    The same kind of dynamic happens in any organization, and so I would include Hamas and Fatah and the political parties in Israel.
    The parties need the individuals and try to bend them, the individuals need the party and try to bend the party in turn.
    There’s only so much bending that the organizations can deal with, and equally, there’s only so much bending that individuals will put up with.
    These group/individual structures are difficult to negotiate, and they can make it pretty difficult to settle disputes or command loyalty or demand a laundry list of beliefs. They also can make space for extreme rhetoric that then becomes very hard to back down from. Indeed, we often get trapped by our need to intensify language well beyond what makes for good policy. The Republicans, as individuals, may very well need the intensity, and the Party as a whole may very well suffer from precisely the inability to control the individual members’ more extreme rhetoric. It might help win some elections, but on the whole, it can make policy development much more difficult.
    The Republicans are confronting the irrationality that has become their brand, and I would guess that similar things are happening, at least in the margins, in Hamas, and in the Israeli right.
    Hope that’s clearer.

    Reply

  30. Sand says:

    Serious questions: and who might those “structure of stakeholders” be? And what would there “agenda” be?

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  31. questions says:

    The “shove” is an interesting image!
    It seems to me that there is a great deal of similarity with the Tea Party politics in Congress and in the next pres election.
    We have now Gingrich (who is shockingly running, who knew?) saying Obama is the “food stamp president”:
    “the Republican former House speaker presented himself in sharp contrast to President Obama, whom he derided as a

    Reply

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