From February 3: A Clarity of Voice and Purpose from Tahrir

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tahrir square egypt.jpgThe statement below was sent to me today. It was released on February 3rd, a few days ago, but is powerful and very much worth reading.
A Statement from the protesters at Cairo’s Tahrir Square to the Egyptian people
The President’s promises and the bloody events of Wednesday February 2
We the protesters who are currently on sit-in at Tahrir (liberation) Square in Cairo since January 25, 2011 strongly condemn the brutal attack carried out by the governing National Democratic Party’s (NDP) mercenaries at our location on Wednesday February 2, under the guise of “rally” in support of President Mubarak.
This attack continues on Thursday February 3. We regret that some young people have joined these thugs and criminals, whom the NDP is accustomed to hire during elections, to march them off after spreading several falsehoods circulated by the regime media about us and our goals. These goals that aim at changing the political system to a one that guarantees freedom, dignity and social justice to all citizens are also the goals of the youth. Therefore we want to clarify the following.
Firstly, we are a group of Muslim and Christian Egyptians; the overwhelming majority of us does not belong to political parties and have no previous political activism. Our movement involves elderly and children, peasants, workers, professionals, students and pensioners. Our movement cannot be classified as “paid for” or “directed by” a limited few because it attracted millions who responded to its emblem of removing the regime. People joined us last Tuesday in Cairo and other governments in a scene that witnessed no one case of violence, property assault or harassment to anyone.
Secondly, our movement is accused of being funded from abroad, supported by the United States, as being instigated by Hamas, as under the leadership of the president of the National Assembly for change (Mohamed El-Baradie) and last but not least, as directed by the Muslim Brotherhood. Many accusations like these prove to be false. Protesters are all Egyptians who have clear and specific national objectives. Protesters have no weapons or foreign equipment as claimed by instigators. The broad positive response by the people to our movement’s goals reveals that these are the goals of the Egyptian masses in general, not any internal or external faction or entity.
Thirdly, the regime and its paid media falsely blame us, demonstrators, for the tension and instability in the streets of Egypt in recent days and therefore for damaging our nation’s interests and security. Our answer to them is: It is not the peaceful protesters who released the criminal offenders from prison to the unguarded streets to practice looting and plundering. It is not the peaceful protesters who have imposed a curfew starting at 3 o’clock PM. It is not the peaceful protesters who have stopped the work in banks, bakeries and gas stations. When protesters organized its one-million demonstration it came up in the most magnificent and organized form and ended peacefully. It is not the protestors who killed 300 people some with live ammunition, and wounding more than 2,000 people in the last few days.
Fourthly, President Mubarak came out on Tuesday to announce that he will not be nominated in the upcoming presidential election and that he will modify two articles in the Constitution, and engage in dialogue with the opposition. However the State media has attacked us when we refused his “concession” and decided to go on with our movement. Our demand that Mubarak steps down immediately is not a personal matter, but we have clear reasons for it which include:

* His promise of not to run again is not new. He has promised when he came to power in 1981 that he will not run for more than two periods but he continued for more than 30 years.
* His speech did not put any collateral for not nominating his son “Gamal”, who remains until the moment a member of the ruling party, and can stand for election that will not be under judicial supervision since he ignored any referring to the amendment of article 88 of the Constitution.
* He also considered our movement a “plot directed by a force” that works against the interests of the nation as if responding to the demands of the public is a “shame” or “humiliation”.
* As regards to his promise of conducting a dialogue with the opposition, we know how many times over the past years the regime claimed this and ended up with enforcing the narrow interests of the Mubarak State and the few people who control it.

And the events of Wednesday proved our stand is vindicated. While the President was giving his promises, the leaders of his regime were organizing (along with paid thugs and wanted criminals equipped with swords, knives and Molotov bombs) a brutal attack plot against us in Tahrir Square. Those thugs and criminals were accompanied by the NDP members who fired machine guns on unarmed protesters who were trapped on the square ground, killing at least 7 and wounding hundreds of us critically. This was done in order to end our peaceful national popular movement and preserve the status quo.
Our movement is Egyptian – Our movement is legitimate- Our movement is continuing
— The youth of Tahrir Square sit-in, February 3, 2011 at 11:30 am

Comments

34 comments on “From February 3: A Clarity of Voice and Purpose from Tahrir

  1. Ajaz Haque says:

    MUBARAK’S STAY WILL ONLY PUSH EGYPT INTO BROTHERHOOD’S LAP
    The Egyptian demonstrations have been led by common folks wanting a corrupt and a dictatorial leader out of power and out of their country. The Muslim Brotherhood is a late comer to the game. In fact the first few days of uprising they stood on the sidelines probably fearing that crowds could turn on them. Watching things heat up, they have gradually come into the fold. By now it is a well known fact that the uprising has nothing to do with the Brotherhood, but, if there is no quick resolution and uncertainty continues, they stand to reap rewards far greater than they deserve.
    The Obama Administration’s backtracking on Hosni Mubarak’s departure may have inflicted a minor blow to the uprising. But Hosni Mubarak’s plan to stay till September and oversee election of his cronies will not be palatable to the Egyptian public. They have had enough of him in thirty years and they want to see the back of him sooner rather than later. The self appointed pundits like Farid Zakaria saying that army will outlast the crowds will probably be proven wrong, as usual.
    Egyptian economy has already suffered $3 billion damage and the longer Mubarak remains as Head of State (with or without full powers), the demonstrations will continue and the losses will multiply. Hosni Mubarak has no credibility to bring a meaningful change to Egyptian constitution or arrange an orderly transition. At this time, he is a catalyst for more violence and upheaval. He should leave Egypt NOW before he suffers a Mussolini like fate.
    The immediate need is to pacify Egyptian public by replacing Mubarak with an interim non-political Authority with a mandate to come up with a constitutional reform package and oversee a fair and transparent election. The interim authority should ideally be headed by a superior court judge and not by the Vice President or the Speaker (both Mubarak’s party men). Once Mubarak is out and the Authority is in place, the public will most likely go back to their daily lives.
    Only then can the new political parties be formed and electioneering begin in earnest. If this path is followed, chances are Egyptian public will reject the Brotherhood, who will be lucky to get 2 to 3% of the vote. However, a prolonged agitation will only strengthen their hands and they would gain significantly by playing on people’s fears.
    It is time for President Obama and Hillary Clinton to act as visionary leaders, with behind the scenes diplomacy and not many public statements. Also, they should not pay attention to those advisors who are for Mubarak’s stay or continued involvement till September. Lest the Iranain revolution repeats itself in Egypt.

    Reply

  2. Don Bacon says:

    nadine,
    Perhaps you have some basis for these charges?
    * Obama is running around
    * showing EVERYBODY in the Middle East that his word is worthless
    * his support is worth less than nothing
    * bashing every ally we have
    like,
    * where has Obama run?
    * what word is worthless?
    * what support is worth less than nothing?
    * what allies have been bashed?
    to help you out,
    * if you mean that Obama has verbally wandered, then say so — but that’s politics
    * if you believe that Obama has abrogated some treaty, then say so
    * if you mean that Obama has withdrawn material support, then what is it?
    * the US has many allied governments — how many of them have been bashed?
    and,
    * what does any of this have to do with defending Israel?
    * do you really think that Israel is comparable to Saudi Arabia? I thought Israel was special.
    * Again, do you really think that Egypt would attack Israel? Why? How?
    finally,
    * His Royal Highness the Saudi king, a staunch Israel supporter, is now in Morocco for physical therapy after his surgery in the US, and plans to threaten Iran again upon his return. I wish him well. (just kidding — I hope he gets Mubarakized))

    Reply

  3. JohnH says:

    Per Nadine, El Baradei, that “spokesman for the MB!” is proven to be anti-Semitic because he said that Israel must make peace with the Egyptian people.”
    Yep, being realistic is a sure sign of anti-Semitism, sworn to Amalek!

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  4. Don Bacon says:

    Last time I checked, the U.S had guaranteed Israel’s survival, including a promise to help defend it.

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  5. Don Bacon says:

    So you think that Egypt would attack Israel with US and German arms? Why? How?

    Reply

  6. Don Bacon says:

    Part of the problem is that U.S. “friends,” that is those governments which best promote U.S. policies, are not friends to their own citizens, thus leading to revolutionary fervor and an unprecedented U.S outreach to the citizens involved. The U.S, SecState has called it a “perfect storm” enveloping the Middle East if leaders do not implement political and social reforms to meet the demands of their people.
    Should we call the galvanized citizens of these countries “adversaries?” No.
    When citizens have more say in their government should we refer to it as a “vacuum?” No.
    Is there anything inherently wrong with citizens of another country ignoring Washington’s wishes? No.

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  7. JohnH says:

    As Nadine says, “Obama has lowered the U.S. profile in the Middle East has not only frightened friends and galvanized adversaries; it has created a vacuum in which every actor, friend and foe, feels free to ignore Washington

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  8. rc says:

    “But the followers of the Muslim Brotherhood can and do say that that they should rip up the peace treaty and go to war.”(nadine, Feb 07 2011, 12:39PM)
    Where is the evidence of this? And since when are the ‘followers’ of any such group of any consequence.
    Some followers of GWBush or Palin probably want something equally controversial. Maybe even some ‘followers’ of Obama?
    It is what the current leaders say as their policy that counts today.
    Nice try.

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  9. WigWag says:

    Jane Harmon to leave Congress and replace (the clueless) Lee Hamilton as President of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/02/07/jane-harman-resigning-fro_n_819536.html
    http://www.wilsoncenter.org/index.cfm

    Reply

  10. Paul Norheim says:

    A comment to what Carroll said above (12:46PM) about
    the wealth of Mubarak’s cronies, his son Gamal included:
    While this is true, these circumstances can also be
    manipulated by the military. They were/are hostile to
    Gamal’s push for a liberalization of the economy (giving
    plenty to his friends in the process), because this could
    take away their own privileges. So they may enforce this
    tendency of making certain cronies scapegoats, in an
    attempt to secure their own interests.
    I just stumbled upon this on BBC online (haven’t yet read
    Zakaria’s piece):
    “Fareed Zakaria says in the Washington Post that it is a big
    mistake to see Egypt’s future lying in an Islamist or even
    Turkish style direction. Instead he suggests you watch the
    army:
    “Since the officers’ coup of 1952, Egypt has been a
    dictatorship, by and for the military… Right now, the
    military is consolidating power… The businessmen have
    been turned into scapegoats, sacrificed so the generals
    can continue to rule. The three people running Egypt – the
    vice president, prime minister and defence chief – come
    from the army….the danger is that Egypt will become a
    sham democracy with real power held in back rooms by
    generals.””

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  11. Dan Kervick says:

    Well at least we agree that people in high positions of authority shouldn’t go around saying various things *must* happen unless they are prepared to back up their demands with actions to make those things happen.
    It was perfectly reasonable and appropriate for Obama to demand a complete settlement freeze from Netanyahu, since that just implements standing US policy. But once he made the demand, he should have taken steps to back it up when Netanyahu defied him.

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  12. nadine says:

    “Fair enough point by Smith, Nadine. So do we now have you on record as a member of the side that favors inflicting a price on Middle East allies who go against the White House?” (Dan Kervick)
    No, I’m on record agreeing with you that Obama should be careful about using “deontic modality” language (I admit, I had to look that one up) on allies, because ordering them about in an arrogant and stupid fashion leads to bad results like this.
    Like Lee Harris, I’m in favor of supporting allies and inflicting prices on enemies who go against the White House. That buys you more allies and fewer enemies down the line. Obama is pursuing the opposite policy.

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  13. WigWag says:

    Thanks for the reference to the Lee Smith article, Nadine. One of the real plusses of the Egyptian imbroglio, however it turns out, will be the wonderful opportunity it provides to castigate the Obama Administration for incompetence.
    Down here in South Florida, everyone is trying to figure out which of Obama’s likely Republican opponents to support for the Republican nomination. The number of Democrats and ex-Democrats who will be working for someone (anyone) other than Obama is unprecedented. The Obama Middle East policy is so unpopular down here and the Obama record is so horrendous, that it should prove easy and fun to bash the Administration for their malpractice in the Middle East.
    We never forget that Florida is a state that can tip a presidential election one way or the other and that as often as not, the candidate who wins Florida is decided by only a percentage point or two.
    No matter what happens in Egypt, the plan is to excoriate the Administration so severely for its Middle East failures that Obama loses thousands or even tens of thousands of crucial votes that he desperately needs.
    I can hardly wait for the election season to start again.

    Reply

  14. Dan Kervick says:

    “Mubarak knew he could get away with crossing Obama because no one in the region has paid a price for going against the White House?”
    Fair enough point by Smith, Nadine. So do we now have you on record as a member of the side that favors inflicting a price on Middle East allies who go against the White House?

    Reply

  15. nadine says:

    Lee Smith: “In one sense, what is happening on the streets of Egyptian cities has little, if anything, to do with Barack Obama. However, it

    Reply

  16. Carroll says:

    A preview for America?…
    A private estate called Egypt
    Only a thousand families count in a country that Mubarak and his cronies regard as their fiefdom
    Salwa Ismail
    guardian.co.uk, Sunday 6 February 2011 19.00 GMT
    There is a lot more behind Hosni Mubarak digging in his heels and setting his thugs on the peaceful protests in Cairo’s Tahrir Square than pure politics. This is also about money. Mubarak and the clique surrounding him have long treated Egypt as their fiefdom and its resources as spoils to be divided among them.
    Under sweeping privatisation policies, they appropriated profitable public enterprises and vast areas of state-owned lands. A small group of businessmen seized public assets and acquired monopoly positions in strategic commodity markets such as iron and steel, cement and wood. While crony capitalism flourished, local industries that were once the backbone of the economy were left to decline. At the same time, private sector industries making environmentally hazardous products like ceramics, marble and fertilisers have expanded without effective regulation at a great cost to the health of the population.
    A tiny economic elite controlling consumption-geared production and imports has accumulated great wealth. This elite includes representatives of foreign companies with exclusive import rights in electronics, electric cables and automobiles. It also includes real estate developers who created a construction boom in gated communities and resorts for the super-rich. Much of this development is on public land acquired at very low prices, with no proper tendering or bidding.
    It is estimated that around a thousand families maintain control of vast areas of the economy.
    This business class sought to consolidate itself and protect its wealth through political office. The National Democratic party was their primary vehicle for doing so. This alliance of money and politics became flagrant in recent years when a number of businessmen became government ministers with portfolios that clearly overlapped with their private interests.
    Mubarak presided over a process in which the national wealth passed into a few private hands while the majority of the population was impoverished, with 40% living below the poverty line of less than $2 a day, rising rates of unemployment, and job opportunities for the young blocked.
    In the last few months of 2010, Egyptians protested for an increase of the minimum monthly wage to less than $240, but the now departed Nazif government decreed that less than $100 was sufficient as a basic income. This, at a time when the prices of food staples and utilities tariffs increased at very high rates. Indeed, as one local economist asserted, every single commodity and service cost significantly more under the Nazif government

    Reply

  17. samuelburke says:

    A Villa in the Jungle?
    by Uri Avnery, February 07, 2011
    Email This | Print This | Share This | Antiwar Forum
    We are in the middle of a geological event. An earthquake of
    epoch-making dimensions is changing the landscape of our
    region. Mountains turn into valleys, islands emerge from the sea,
    volcanoes cover the land with lava.
    Yet what every young Arab from Morocco to Oman saw daily was
    his leaders humiliating themselves, forsaking their Palestinian
    brothers in order to gain favor and money from America,
    collaborating with the Israeli occupation, cringing before the new
    colonizers. This was deeply humiliating for young people
    brought up on the achievements of Arab culture in times gone
    by and the glories of the early caliphs.
    Nowhere was this loss of honor more obvious than in Egypt,
    which openly collaborated with the Israeli leadership in imposing
    the shameful blockade on the Gaza Strip, condemning 1.5
    million Arabs to malnutrition and worse. It was never just an
    Israeli blockade, but an Israeli-Egyptian one, lubricated by 1.5
    billion U.S. dollars every year.
    I have reflected many times

    Reply

  18. samuelburke says:

    Why Is Israel So Blind?
    February 02, 2011 3:55 pm ET

    Reply

  19. nadine says:

    “We can’t dismiss the implications of the Egypt movement upon I/P. ” (Don Bacon)
    That much is true, Don. You have to understand that the masses in Egypt (like elsewhere in the Arab world) have been subject to Nazi-level (originally Nazi-inspired) propaganda against Israel for the last 50 years. In an Egyptian context, literally nobody can stand up and suggest that Egypt should normalize relations with Israel. But the followers of the Muslim Brotherhood can and do say that that they should rip up the peace treaty and go to war.
    However, this Egyptian upheaval should be another nail in the coffin of “linkage” – the idea that all the other moving parts in the Middle East are somehow dependent on the I/P peace process. “Linkage” sounded plausible in the Beltway to the same people who never uttered a warning that the current upheaval was even possible.

    Reply

  20. samuelburke says:

    POA i am glad you are here to blast the ziozombies.
    Wig, i suggest you start (continue) worrying about the turn in the
    american press with regards to the blemishes on your beloved.
    there is no other issue more important than this one to our
    foreign policy.
    the u.s needs friends in the muslim world.
    American revolution
    by PHILIP WEISS on FEBRUARY 7, 2011

    Reply

  21. nadine says:

    POA, can even you believe the nonsense you dish out? Wigwag and I are “on script” in agreeing with the “worldview of a huge segment of the American public”? What, are we sending out our telepathic mind control beams to mesmerize the public? You can’t even admit we are expressing our own opinions? Wigwag & I don’t even agree half the time!
    You certainly are no democrat; you display an utter contempt for the intelligence of your fellow citizens. I suppose we should all be ruled by a small coterie of the truly enlightened like yourself against our wills, right?
    This is what the hard-Left has become: wannabe autocrats. They elected a socialist for President, and controlled the 110th and 111th Congress as well, and the result was the American people said, “We don’t like this. This is not the change we voted for.” But the Left just can’t admit they lost the argument. They want to delegitimize the opposition and silence it by force.
    Free speech for me but not for thee.

    Reply

  22. Don Bacon says:

    I GET it — the harbinger bit. Steve is going to sell TWN to TimeWarner?

    Reply

  23. Dan Kervick says:

    Well, the new globally expanding, AOL-fueled Huffington Post is already bored with the Egyptian Revolution. They need yet more space for Arianna Huffington to promote herself. A harbinger of the global future, I guess.

    Reply

  24. Don Bacon says:

    We can’t dismiss the implications of the Egypt movement upon I/P.
    “While more democracy in the Middle East would bring a stronger expression of the dissatisfaction of the masses with American foreign policy, especially related to the Palestinian problem, American decision makers might be compelled to reconsider their approach and, in these circles, the voices of those who advocate the need to consider American global interests beyond its strategic alliance with Israel might be heard more loudly.” — G

    Reply

  25. Don Bacon says:

    I posted some comments by conservatives on a previous thread, which included their support for the events in Egypt. As Paul indicates many neocons who have promoted democracy are also on board.
    The Atlantic
    Monday, February 7, 2011
    Jeffrey Goldberg
    The Neocons Split with Israel Over Egypt
    “The neoconservatives, who have made democracy promotion in the Middle East an overarching goal, are scratching their heads at what they see as Israeli shortsightedness. I asked Elliott Abrams, formerly of the Bush Administration National Security Council, and now at the Council on Foreign Relations, what he makes of the Israeli longing for Mubarak. He was scathing in his response:
    ‘The Israelis first of all do not believe in the universality of democracy. They believe what many American “experts” did in, say, 1950–democracy was fine for us and Western Europe, but not for Latins (too much Catholic culture) and Asians (too much Confucianism). They believe Arab culture does not permit democracy.'”
    Liberals Had Better Get Organized
    By Francis Fukuyama
    “At present, the best-organized forces in Egypt are the military and the Muslim Brotherhood. Egyptians who want a free and democratic future had better get busy organizing themselves if those groups are not to inherit the future.”
    Stop presses — Fukuyama is saying that liberals had better get organized.

    Reply

  26. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Don, pay attention to Wiggie and Nadine. They are on script, and are feeding you the bullshit, insinuations, injected paranoia, and out and out lies that the RW public is being fed 24/7.
    Their kind of drool is what forms the worldview of a huge segment of the American public. If you do not understand that, you cannot counter it, or accurately predict policy. Marketing precedes policy.

    Reply

  27. erichwwk says:

    Along the line of my earlier comment by Bruce Gagnaon, I note that it is being reported that GWBush is canceling his trip to Switzerland.
    Bush Cancels Trip for Fear of Prosecution, Mass Protests
    A planned visit to Switzerland by former president George W. Bush to attend a fund-raising gala is not to be.
    The rights group World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT) this week called on Swiss authorities to open an investigation into Bush as former commander-in-chief of US forces if he sets foot on Swiss soil.
    The Geneva-based OMCT on Thursday released a letter it sent to Swiss President and Foreign Minister Micheline Calmy-Rey to underline Switzerland’s obligations under domestic law and the UN Convention Against Torture.
    http://www.alternet.org/module/printversion/149811
    Hmmm… while we signatory to the same treaty requiring torture allegations be investigating, and have long given up the facade of “rule of law”, there are still western countries where law matters.

    Reply

  28. Paul Norheim says:

    “This [token] US support of empire dissidents also has
    implications in other countries” (DonBacon)
    Yes, and in this context, i think the split among the neocons
    is significant. Many of the leading neocons now openly
    support the protestors in Egypt and Tunisia. Those pro-
    Israelis who openly support the autocracies may become
    politically isolated in the US. If this spreads to Syria, Algeria,
    but especially Jordan, this tension on the right will increase.
    And if the Israeli establishment continues to support the
    dictators in the regions, Netanyahu’s ability to influence the
    US congress may be diminished by this new development
    among the neocon Republicans.

    Reply

  29. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “That means that the dissidents are not officially and automatically classified as “terrorists” simply because they endanger the empire, and can legally be supported by Americans”
    Your reluctance to pay attention to the mainstream media creates huge holes in your understanding of events and our resultant policies. In many ways, this movement IS being presented as a “takeover” by radical Islamic elements. Such propaganda is used to lubricate our acceptence of developing policy.

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  30. DonS says:

    Speaking of empire, in his column, Chris Hedges is writing generally of suppression and annihilation of spirit and body. It could be about Egypt; but equally about us:
    “The language of beneficence is used to speak to those outside the centers of death and pillage, those who have not yet been totally broken, those who still must be seduced to hand over power to predators. The road traveled to total disempowerment, however, ends at the same place. It is the language used to get there that is different.”
    http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/recognizing_the_language_of_tyranny_20110206/

    Reply

  31. WigWag says:

    “Firstly, we are a group of Muslim and Christian Egyptians; the overwhelming majority of us does not belong to political parties and have no previous political activism.”
    Let’s just hope that none of those Muslim Egyptians participating in the demonstrations ever decides to convert to Christianity. After all, we know the penalty for that in Egypt and many other Muslim nations; the penalty is death. I wonder if the Egyptian Revolution is successful, whether those whose conscience requires them to abandon Islam in favor of another faith tradition will be more likely to be executed or less likely to be executed.
    I guess we will just have to wait to see.
    As for the Copts, I am sure that they are just so eager for the Muslim Brotherhood to assume a greater position of influence in Egyptian society. That should solve all their problems

    Reply

  32. Don Bacon says:

    “Our movement is Egyptian – Our movement is legitimate- Our movement is continuing”
    This non-violent movement by Egyptians is in the best tradition of the Indian independence and the US civil rights movements, and is all the more remarkable because it has no Gandhi nor MLK, Jr. to lead it. These incredibly brave grass-roots demonstrations were wide and deep. Hopefully that is a strength and not a weakness. We must be patient and see. Those other movements didn’t result in immediate change and neither will this one.
    One advantage the Egyptians dissidents have is that their movement, unlike others threatening the US/Israel empire, has received at least token support by the US government. That’s good! That means that the dissidents are not officially and automatically classified as “terrorists” simply because they endanger the empire, and can legally be supported by Americans. Let’s do it, however we can.
    This US support of empire dissidents also has implications in other countries, and might inspire more anti-empire movements and sustain existing ones. It blurs the classification of Hezbollah as terrorists, for one thing.

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  33. erichwwk says:

    Bruce Gagnon has an astute observation on why the Obama administration is dragging its feet and supporting the interim VP, rendition accomplice Suleiman –
    “I was watching CBS News and they were talking about how the Egyptian transfer of power is going to take some time and that the public needs to be patient. Then one of talking heads starting recalling how various Iranians had once been brought to Egypt for torture and that it was known the CIA was involved. I started thinking that Mubarak and his agents must have lots of files and records to destroy before he leaves town. This could be one key reason why all of this back and forth is going on now. They are stalling for time.”
    http://space4peace.blogspot.com/2011/02/inside-revolution-square.html
    Lots of documentation concerning illegal and corrupt involvement of the Western Nations to shred.

    Reply

  34. Paul Norheim says:

    “Firstly, we are a group of Muslim and Christian Egyptians;
    the overwhelming majority of us does not belong to political
    parties and have no previous political activism.”
    So the challenge is to convert all this political energy into
    more permanent organized forms, filling the huge political
    vacuum between the rulers and the Muslim Brotherhood.

    Reply

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