Bush Approval Level Falls to 29%: Let’s Not Forget That Rove May Drive It Lower

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Recently, I wrote that “if all things remained equal“, if Karl Rove was indicted in Patrick Fitzgerald’s investigation of the Valerie Plame Wilson outing case, Bush’s numbers would fall to 28%.
Well, things didn’t remain equal and the Bush administration has shot itself in the foot again with the disclosures that it strong-armed all of the nation’s leading telecom firms (except Qwest which valiantly held out) into providing entire data bases of ALL calls made domestically inside the United States.
No wonder why the Bush administration evaded the FISA Court and process. There is no way that this kind of surveillance and building of a data base would have been approved.
In the latest Harris interactive poll, Bush’s approval rating has fallen to 29%.
I am revising my figures on Bush and Rove.
If Rove is indicted in this environment, Bush’s favorability rating will fall to 24%.
Momentum is on the side of those in doubt of Bush as well as his administration’s integrity and competency.
— Steve Clemons

Comments

52 comments on “Bush Approval Level Falls to 29%: Let’s Not Forget That Rove May Drive It Lower

  1. hydrocodone says:

    Nice blog, best design. Thanks!

    Reply

  2. Kathleen says:

    Red Neck Repub,
    I love your nicknames. Dumbya’s a favorite. Do you mind if I borrow them once in a while?

    Reply

  3. sona says:

    It is quite probable that the telecommunications companies are in violation of Section 222 of the Communications Act “……to protect the confidentiality of customer proprietary information (“CPNI”), such as the telephone numbers called by customers and the length oftime of the calls. . . .”.
    They may also be acting against the provisions of 18 U.S.C. Section 2702 which requires a court order for the disclosure of such information.
    ACLU has filed a lawsuit againt the NSA for warrantless wiretapping.
    AP reports that two public interest lawyers have filed a $5 billion suit against Verizon in New Jersey for violating privacy laws by handing over phone records to NSA without customers’ prior assent.
    The issue is muddled unless we know more of the data being collected. Electronic surveillance, as defined by FISA under Section 180, requires a court order for intercepting communication that includes information on recipient and source as well as contents relating to “…… substance, purport, or meaning of that communication”. The requirement for judicial approval is upheld by the Patriot Act which lowered the threshold of evidence required to be submitted to the FISA court and granted the FBI the authority to seek administrative subpoenas through National Security Letters but the NSA was excluded by the Congress from seeking this resort.
    NSA is not collecting the data directly. The telecommunications carriers are. NSA might argue that it is receiving business data from private carriers.
    The Government has already claimed the right under Article II to act without regard to existing statutory provisions in the interests of national security and defence.
    Kate Martin, Director, Centre for National Security Studies, discusses many of the legal issues at:
    http://www.acsblog.org/bill-of-rights-2835-guest-blogger-nsa-again-violates-the-law.html

    Reply

  4. jack says:

    Bush on Monday will announce a major troop withdrawl from Iraq with the aim to juggle forces to put a guard presence on the border, but in reality the troop build-up at home is taking place for the civil unrest that is coming within a year.

    Reply

  5. Carroll says:

    Brillant observation civitas, but I do believe you missed my point.
    “Everyone isn’t going to love America no matter what we do or don’t do.
    Posted by civitas at May 13, 2006 03:09 PM”

    Reply

  6. Lara says:

    Thanks Kathleen.

    Reply

  7. anon says:

    Where are the Democrats?
    Answer……. they no different from the RETHUGS

    Reply

  8. Kathleen says:

    Lara, thank you, it does help.
    ski, I was thinking if Dopey’s numbers went low enough they’d do that PAVLOVIAN COLOR CODE THINGEE AGAIN. Now we’ll all know when to salivate and tremble in unison.

    Reply

  9. civitas says:

    Everyone isn’t going to love America no matter what we do or don’t do.

    Reply

  10. Carroll says:

    The thing is….does it matter what Bush’s ratings are?
    I don’t think so…
    He and even worse Cheney are still in the WH, setting the world on fire and making everyone love America cause we are rich and free.
    And even if Bush were to go before three years, we still have a congress just as corrupt as the WH.

    Reply

  11. Robert M. Gerrity says:

    Hey, group & host Steve–we’re in the middle of a Constitutional Crisis and no one seems to grasp that!
    G’s base is fractured and in slo-mo free-fall. So long as Cheney is there & falling asleep all the time now, G thinks his ass is covered. But I’ll take Dennis Hastert over those two at this point.
    And a unilateral strike against Iran will cause BOTH the regular generals and colonels of the Pentagon along with 3/4ths of the Congress to revolt. ’cause then watch what happens to gas prices.
    If G bombs Iran, he’s doomed the GOP as a major party for two generations. McCain will be the first GOPer to call for impeachment (ok maybe Lugar with the two Maine wafflers right behind).
    G goes to 22%, if not lower.
    Remember, even among the wingnuts, there are marginal wingers. Religion means a lot to them but so too does liberty & life. Things like using the National Guard at the borders is a PR stunt that the MSM will have to expose as a lot of those units are depleted from repeat Iraq service. And if the prez decided not to really use the Guard for Katrina but had to turn to the Regular Army to do that–Katrina being a REAL emergency–than to use the Guard for Border service is see-through gossamer hollow. And now that the MSM has been given its Colbert-shots, it won’t be able to resist the blood in the water.
    Doesn’t matter if Karl goes or stays. (But if indicted, its 19%.) Gas is up to stay, more US deaths in Iraq every day again, the NSA spying is starting to cut through into the average voter’s mind (“my phone?!”), there’s more bribe charges coming (the House Appropriations Chairman for chrissakes! Will they cuff him on the House floor?) and finally there’s now–
    Sex at the Watergate.
    Now that mental picture everyone can grasp. Broads & fueled by booze in exchange for votes.
    And when the FBI AND, I repeat AND, the CIA team-up, the knives are out and scores are about to settled.
    And we’ve got 2 1/2 years to go of this Un-administration.
    Its a CRISIS, I tell ya.
    Who will think on The Republic in the quiet of the night?

    Reply

  12. Marica says:

    There is a new Newsweek poll on the data bases that gives 53%-goes too far and 41%-necessary tool to combat terrorism.
    At least they got this out before next week. There is a significent difference with the Wash.P poll.

    Reply

  13. elementary teacher says:

    Is it possible that the companies who provided the data bases of “our” calls could be sued? Can a president be sued privately by the public? Can a class action suit be initiated against the malcreants for collusion, breach of privacy laws, anti-trust violations? Perhaps it is not only (hyperbole unintended) the 4th Ammendment at issue — it seems logical that other laws and/or state statutes might also be involved. A gargantuan amount of info is tranmitted across phone lines, fax paperwork, medical and other financial records, stock transactions, etc. I’m not a lawyer, but somebody has to be all over this.

    Reply

  14. reality-based educator says:

    Will Bush’s Monday announcement that he plans to send National Guard troops to guard the borders assuage some of the angrier parts of his base who are deserting him?
    If Rove/Bolten/Bush have made the decision to just wingnut everything from now on to get back to the core 34% range so that they can hold onto some semblance of power, they must know what it will take to get back the 5% of the base who have deserted them. It seems to me the immigration speech is a core part of the policy to regain some base support for the long fight ahaead when Rove goes down to indictment.

    Reply

  15. Pissed Off American says:

    The polls that count are tallied at the balloting booth. And the Bush criminals, in league with the likes of ESS and Diebold, are doing the counting there. If they do not think we will buy into another inexplicable Republican victory, than they will hand us some mewling asshole shill like Kerry, who will represent the same interests and advance the same agendas.
    Or, of course, there are PLENTY of juicy targets out there for ANOTHER staged terrorist action. Rove’s travails will get shoved to the background pretty damned quick if they fill the prime time TV slot with another round of images such as we saw on 9/11. If you think these bastards are beyond killing a few more thousand of us, then you haven’t been following Bush’s environmnental policies.
    Look, if your vote isn’t counted, it doesn’t matter WHAT the polls say.
    http://www.blackboxvoting.org

    Reply

  16. casual_observer says:

    At some point today the Rove indictment story should get traction, just in time for headlines in the Sunday papers and perhaps the sunday morning news shows.
    Nixonian lows in public opinion dead ahead.

    Reply

  17. ski says:

    Has anyone noticed that the terror alert level, which the media had stopped reporting, is now appearing again on the Fox and CNN news tickers?
    It’s “elevated” for what it’s worth — and that ain’t much. Is this supposed to help us ignore Bush spying on us and raise his approval rating?

    Reply

  18. twc says:

    What wkmaier said, at 3:23 p.m. — that quickie poll was just too quick. The story was just breaking that day (Thursday). Of the 500 people polled, I suspect that at least half had not heard anything about it yet. It only appeared in the papers on Friday morning.
    And, in addition to the Rove indictment that will probably come next week, there will be still more revelations from both the Jack Abramoff and Duke Cunningham investigations as spring moves into summer. And those numbers will continue to slide further…

    Reply

  19. Liesbeth says:

    The fix is in: Hillary Clinton will be the next president of the United States. Murdoch is a genius; already the tone on Fox is changing: from unquestioning endorsement of George Bush to posing questions by some of the lesser anchors who will soon be heralded as the true reporters in the US.
    Remember, in 1997 Blair could only win an election by seeking Murdoch’s backing as owner of the Sun.
    The fix is in.

    Reply

  20. Lara says:

    Thanks Citizen Spot for posting the news about Rove from Truthout.
    Now we know the REAL reason why Bush is doing a speech on Monday (to distract and FORCE the media to cover immigration) when the story will likely break wide open.
    Is it possible that Fitzgerald could have persuaded the Grand Jury to indict today and that Fitzgerald is just now working out the “press conference details” for Monday?

    Reply

  21. GQ says:

    I predict Bush will bottom out at 26%. The super hard-core will just follow the President’s footsteps and blame the polls and everything wrong with the president on the media–their tried and true automatic “get-out-of-jail-free” card.
    I’d like Steve and/or other Foreign Policy big-whigs (i.e. Wes Clark) to take advantage of Bush’s low numbers and strong arm the Administration into smart policy on Iran. I don’t trust these people. I’m not quite convinced that this administration would go to war to stop sagging poll numbers, but these people have proven over and over again to be just that cynical.

    Reply

  22. km4 says:

    The GOP cesspool run by a gang of criminals who have plundered the U.S. Treasury to give military industrial complex favors and tax breaks to their well-connected buddies is going down.

    Reply

  23. Lara says:

    Just thought I’d comment on the poll because I am a political scientist (ph.d.) and one of my majors was quantitative methods…
    OK, the margin of error of a poll is DIRECTLY related to the sample size (the number of people in the poll). Hence, when you have a sample of size of around 1200, you end up with a MOE of around +/- 3%. Similarly, if you have a sample size of 500, you end up with the MOE that they got (+/- 5%). It is somewhat “complicated” but short hand is that it is all related to the mathematical assumptions and probability theory surrounding the “normal curve.”
    Further, a poll with +/- 5% means that the pollsters are 95% confident that the interval between 68% and 58% will contain the “true mean.” The true mean (or average)is the mean that you would get if you asked EVERYONE in the entire population. Hence, 63% is the “sample mean” (the average that came up in the poll) and the margin of error tells you how “far away” it is possible for the true mean to be.
    In other words, there is NO difference statistically between 58% and 68% percent – in the sense that the “true mean” could fall anywhere in that interval and we don’t actually KNOW what it is. Even more perplexing is the fact that there is a 5% chance that the “true mean” could fall outside this interval (that is what it means to calculate the stats. to the 95% confidence interval).
    Lastly, on the internet polls – they are not valid samples because people “self-select” into them. They are not representative samples (you need randomness in order to claim this kind of validity). In other words, everyone who answered an internet poll likely cares about the topic already and that is why the polls are so lop-sided.
    That being said, I am certain that the ABC poll was taken TOO early to register a “good” reading on how the public feels about the issue. Most people haven’t even heard about it….but my guess is that by Monday (just when Bush is trying to distract the country with his immigration speech), more people will have had a chance to understand the issues. Should someone do a poll that covers Sun. – Mon. and then is reported out on Tuesday, the percent favorable would most likely change.
    Hope this helps.

    Reply

  24. Dusty says:

    Jason Leopold states Krazy Karl has already told the Shrub he will be indicted. Jason hasn’t been wrong so far..
    The Shrub’s numbers will hit the 24% mark..the general public just can’t be that stupid.

    Reply

  25. Tom Marshall says:

    C’mon Steve, have some faith. I know the bush can make it into the teens.

    Reply

  26. Talcott says:

    Orwell was right he just got the Date wrong.
    “If ye love wealth greater than liberty, the tranquillity of servitude greater than the animating contest for freedom, go home from us in peace. We seek not your counsel, nor your arms. Crouch down and lick the hand that feeds you; May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen.”
    –Samuel Adams

    Reply

  27. vaughan says:

    I think snookered has an excellent point.
    This is one of my big concerns. Why should we trust the Republican Party–the party repeatedly shown to act for the sake of The Party (like the Soviets) rather than the sake of the citizens of this country.
    Government contracts, political pay-back, black-mail…the potential for misuse is huge. How much more Orwellian can you get?

    Reply

  28. John Wilson says:

    Poll numbers ain’t votes.
    I fear there is too much unhatched chicken-counting.
    Rove is just getting started…

    Reply

  29. snookered says:

    I haven’t heard (read) a single peep about the nefarious uses BushCo and the TelCos might get up to with that data. How simple would it be for Bush to connect the dots on friend or foe? They could catch leakers very easily it seems? Maybe he mistrusts an aide or Rep insider, he could surviel his call and determine if he is calling the NYT or WaPo or heaven forbid….Democrats! I would like to hear in the greater public square talk of how bad people could profit politcaly or finacially from the illegal database.
    Any brainiacs out there have some examples of egregious uses???
    Tks.

    Reply

  30. wkmaier says:

    Columbia Slough,
    Your pull from the article about the poll is key. USA broke the story on Thursday, and yes, the various internets picked it up same day. But, my local papers only had the story TODAY (Friday). It all depends on how and where people were getting their news about the latest NSA spy scandal. Also, it may take some time for the full impact to sink in.
    I’m agreeing that 25% is a very doable number. Rove Indictment could send that number under 20%.

    Reply

  31. civitas says:

    “Rove is not going to be indicted”
    I agree, it doesn’t appear that he will be.
    “Bush will attack Iran after the mid-term elections no matter what his approval ratings are or who wins the elections.”
    I don’t think approval ratings will determine the outcome of the situation with Iran either. And I agree, it looks like it will come to a confrontation with Iran, unless Iran suddenly reverses course. Maybe not likely but could be possible.
    “There will be an address to the nation to inform us that the operation is underway; there will be no consultation of Congress”
    I think there will be consultation with Congress, at least that’s been Bush’s pattern.
    “If Dems capture the supeaona power then to flummox their plans start one hell of a war.”
    If the dems do take both houses of Congress, they’ll be looking at impeaching Bush while Bush might have an invasion of Iran underway.

    Reply

  32. red_neck_repub says:

    And General Elmer Fudd and Abu Gonzales cooked up the whole NSA spying thing themselves. Dumbya isn’t smart enough to have thought of it.

    Reply

  33. God of All Gods says:

    Condoleezza Rice at Boston College? I quit
    By Steve Almond | May 12, 2006
    DEAR Father Leahy,
    I am writing to resign my post as an adjunct professor of English at Boston College.
    I am doing so — after five years at BC, and with tremendous regret — as a direct result of your decision to invite Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to be the commencement speaker at this year’s graduation.
    Many members of the faculty and student body already have voiced their objection to the invitation, arguing that Rice’s actions as secretary of state are inconsistent with the broader humanistic values of the university and the Catholic and Jesuit traditions from which those values derive.
    But I am not writing this letter simply because of an objection to the war against Iraq. My concern is more fundamental. Simply put, Rice is a liar.
    She has lied to the American people knowingly, repeatedly, often extravagantly over the past five years, in an effort to justify a pathologically misguided foreign policy.
    The public record of her deceits is extensive. During the ramp-up to the Iraq war, she made 29 false or misleading public statements concerning Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction and links to Al Qaeda, according to a congressional investigation by the House Committee on Government Reform.
    To cite one example:
    In an effort to build the case for war, then-National Security Adviser Rice repeatedly asserted that Iraq was pursuing a nuclear weapon, and specifically seeking uranium in Africa.
    In July of 2003, after these claims were disproved, Rice said: ”Now if there were doubts about the underlying intelligence . . . those doubts were not communicated to the president, the vice president, or to me.”
    Rice’s own deputy, Stephen Hadley, later admitted that the CIA had sent her a memo eight months earlier warning against the use of this claim.
    In the three years since the war began, Rice has continued to misrepresent or simply ignore the truth about our deadly adventure in Iraq.
    Like the president whom she serves so faithfully, she refuses to recognize her errors or the tragic consequences of those errors to the young soldiers and civilians dying in Iraq. She is a diplomat whose central allegiance is not to the democratic cause of this nation, but absolute power.
    This is the woman to whom you will be bestowing an honorary degree, along with the privilege of addressing the graduating class of 2006.
    It is this last notion I find most reprehensible: that Boston College would entrust to Rice the role of moral exemplar.
    To be clear: I am not questioning her intellectual gifts or academic accomplishments. Nor her potentially inspiring role as a powerful woman of color.
    But these are not the factors by which a commencement speaker should be judged. It is the content of one’s character that matters here — the reverence for truth and knowledge that Boston College purports to champion.
    Rice does not personify these values; she repudiates them. Whatever inspiring rhetoric she might present to the graduating class, her actions as a citizen and politician tell a different story.
    Honestly, Father Leahy, what lessons do you expect her to impart to impressionable seniors?
    That hard work in the corporate sector might gain them a spot on the board of Chevron? That they, too, might someday have an oil tanker named after them? That it is acceptable to lie to the American people for political gain?
    Given the widespread objection to inviting Rice, I would like to think you will rescind the offer. But that is clearly not going to happen.
    Like the administration in Washington, you appear too proud to admit to your mistake. Instead, you will mouth a bunch of platitudes, all of which boil down to: You don’t want to lose face.
    In this sense, you leave me no choice.
    I cannot, in good conscience, exhort my students to pursue truth and knowledge, then collect a paycheck from an institution that displays such flagrant disregard for both.
    I would like to apologize to my students and prospective students. I would also urge them to investigate the words and actions of Rice, and to exercise their own First Amendment rights at her speech.

    Reply

  34. civitas says:

    Since Bush won’t be running again and it doesn’t look like Cheney will run either, what difference does even a 29% approval rating make?

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  35. Kathleen says:

    I’m so proud to be from CT. where Dubya’s poll numbers are the lowest, 24%!!! and that was BEFORE this latest NSA fiasco.
    Current poll numbers on the NSA warrantless wiretapping were taken last Dec. when Dubya was claiming only international calls being wiretapped.
    Worse than that, Wayne Madsen Reports has a piece on how Hayden labeled all of John Bolton’s NSA intercept requests as “training missions” so they could be erased without a trace, so if they are going after political enemies, like Plame, they can call them “training missions” and no one will be the wiser.
    Let’s all do the How Low Can You Go Limbo.
    Color ‘im peach, now.

    Reply

  36. sona says:

    joice – sorry to disappoint you but Rove will be indited. Fitzgerald will do this by June – this week’s end was never a dead line. Its likely to be on similar grounds as Libby’s indictment. If he was clear, this would have been communicated to Rove’s legal team by now and the latter has stopped spinning and gone somewhat silent rather than crowing.
    NSA is not necessarily ‘listening’ into all conversations but building a huge database for tracking by keywords. It does not necessarily translate into higher security given that some of the dead 9/11 hijackers were known by the FBI as being potential terrorists and nothing was done.
    A large database, however should cause concern. Corporations loved fascist Italy and Nazi Germany and continued investment in both countries throught the war. There were no computers then but they had IBM punch cards to store data on residents’ religious and political affiliations in administrative districts in Germany and German occupied territories and transport infrastructure. IBM had contracts with Nazi Germany for on site service delivery beyond 1942. The data was used to coordinate SS raids and organise transport to labour and concentration camps.
    My point is, when corporations get too close to legitimate government, the phenomenon compromises the democratic political process. This happened in both Italy and Germany and is indisputably occuring in the USA now. Also, the database on a huge number of people remains to be abused unless the database is destroyed or supervised out of Executive control.

    Reply

  37. linda says:

    joice, dahling:
    http://www.wave3.com/Global/story.asp?S=4893101
    face it, your boy’s going down. and not a moment too soon, if the constitutional authority of this government is to be saved.

    Reply

  38. KAOA says:

    Let’s hope that Rove doen’t think that going to war with Iran will be a hail Mary pass to save “W”.

    Reply

  39. joice says:

    The Republicans need to disown Bush publicly to do well in the mid-term elections.
    Linda, dahling, a US oil “executive” wasn’t killed in Nigeria, probably just a worker; there are many Americans working the rigs offshore Nigeria. The oil pipeline explosion is most likely from hordes of Nigerians gathering to steal oil from a compromised pipeline, as is typical there, and she blew, nothing terribly out of the ordinary, except for in blowing up this time.
    Rove is not going to be indicted; it was this week or never; this week being over, it’s never. Too bad.
    Bush will attack Iran after the mid-term elections no matter what his approval ratings are or who wins the elections. There will be an address to the nation to inform us that the operation is underway; there will be no consultation of Congress; Bush must complete his program, be true to his word, his gut, his destiny, his God; the poll numbers mean nothing to his plans especially if there is no hope to regain the nation’s support, in fact, poll numbers in the 20s are probably more of an incentive to attack Iran as there is nothing more to lose, in his mind history will bear out that he was right all along. If Dems capture the supeaona power then to flummox their plans start one hell of a war.

    Reply

  40. Columbia Slough says:

    The Washington Post article about the WAPO-ABC News poll ends with this paragraph:
    “A total of 502 randomly selected adults were interviewed Thursday night for this survey. Margin of sampling error is five percentage points for the overall results. The practical difficulties of doing a survey in a single night represents another potential source of error.”
    It would be great to have a credible pollster of stature quickly comment on this kind of “in the heat of the night” polling methodology and the magnitude of error it may carry. The “+/- 5 percentage points” comment probably refers to the sample size alone. There are other sources of error introduced here, but not discussed by the article. My guess is that this result is getting WAY more attention than it deserves given its small sample size, methodology, and timing.

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  41. steve duncan says:

    Mr. Clemons, the master of the oxymoronic phrase: Bush administration’s integrity and competency. Ha, ha, ha! A very good funny, Steve!

    Reply

  42. Punchy says:

    This ABC poll so widely discussed is also at phenomenal odds with every internet poll. Most internet polls have this 75/25 disapprove/approve, so what and how ABC got such a high number is inexplicable. Methinks 500 respondents is too small, but alas, I am not a statistician.
    These ABC-type numbers will drop as people realize the duplicity by which the Admin has been operating.

    Reply

  43. linda says:

    kim, i would suggest that is corporate media’s attempt to get out front and shape public perception. if you look at previous polling on national security/wiretap issues, the public was fairly evenly split — and this was under the assumption that the surveillance was restricted to the ‘terrorists and their sympathizers’ and inbound/outbound international calls — not domestic calls between me and my sister.
    the wapo/abc numbers are very suspect (501 respondents) and i would suggest a little push-pulling might be at play.
    http://www.pollingreport.com/terror.htm

    Reply

  44. kim says:

    Guys, the ABC-WP poll indicates that most of the public supports the NSA phone spying program, as stunning as that is. So, I don’t expect his numbers will fall at all.
    The next decline depends entirely on Rove.

    Reply

  45. Frank says:

    Yes Lars, the lower his numbers gets, the more apt he will go into Iran with bombs…Bush is a mad man, a dangerous messianic buffoon. He will claim he is saving us from the terrorists, as he claims he is doing after all his law breaking antics are revealed. Our glorious leader who thinks the constitution “is just a god damned piece of paper” will be emboldened to make a “hail Mary pass”. Going into Iran with bombs is it! He fears House subpena powers once the Dems take over the House. Too many secrets under the guise of national defense. Even if the congress wakes up and passes a resolution that Bush needs congressional approval before any hostile action in Iran is taken, he will interpret what is good for American citizens ala “signing statement” antics.. I fear he hopes that with a hotter war, his “gather round the flag boys” will negate that possibility. Yes, it gets scarier with each point drop in his poll ratings. Remember, the repubs are noted for their criminal “October surprises”

    Reply

  46. John says:

    If they can go to 29% they can go to 0.

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  47. linda says:

    watch out iran — the ships are steaming your way as i type this.
    oh yeah, there was a huge explosion of a nigerian pipeline this a.m., killing a couple hundred according to early reports. not to mention the assassination of a u.s. oil executive earlier this week.
    how about bets on how high a barrel of oil will be by this time next week.

    Reply

  48. susan says:

    still, how low is it going to have to go before CNN, the WaPo and the Beltway talking heads stop cheerleading for Maximum Leader?

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  49. Dude says:

    I think this poll was conducted before the USA Today story dropped. It is probably safe to say that polls will soften up another three points once the shock of the illegal spying hits Main Street.

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  50. notimetowaste says:

    I don’t think the 29% figure took into account the latest NSA fiasco, so it might be close to 24% even without a Rove indictment, in the teens if Rove goes down.

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  51. lars says:

    Once the market crashes, so will the 29%.
    Can a president have two wars with such low popular support? Yes.
    Can he have another one? Please, somebody, tell me no.
    Is there anything we know about Rove’s political repertoire that would allow us to sleep easy?

    Reply

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