Thinking About Terrorism

-

2808339285_46fe7997cf_m.jpgThe most recent terrorist attempt to attack New York on Saturday has got me thinking in the last few days, especially if it turns out to be true that the would-be-car bomber may have been acting in reaction to American drone strikes in Pakistan.
This just reinforces for me how serious our lack of strategic outlook is, and the fact that we need to seriously rethink our approach to terrorism, as it impacts not only our actions but also our interactions with countries around the world.
In that vein, I’d like to point you in the direction of a piece published today in The Atlantic by New America research associate (and sometime TWN blogger) Andrew Lebovich, on Morocco’s disruption of an “al Qaeda-linked” cell last week. Two key paragraphs:

Reports last week that Moroccan security forces arrested 24 members of an “al Qaeda-linked cell” and were looking for another in France, for example, have raised concerns in Western media of an expanded al Qaeda threat in North Africa. But what do we really know about the case? As with many such regimes, the opaque nature of Morocco’s government, especially concerning issues of terrorism, makes independent confirmation of official statements on the incident difficult. At the same time, the international and regional context of the arrests suggest the possibility that – whether or not the charges are true – Morocco’s government may be invested in using the threat of terrorism for political and economic gain.
…For everything that’s particular to Morocco, distinguishing the real threat of organized terrorism from the projections of interested governments is increasingly a global problem. Russia, for example, has used the language of the Global War on Terror to justify its brutal tactics in Chechnya, where Chechen terrorists are just one part of the complicated conflict. In more recent months, Yemen’s government tried to link Huthi rebels, which challenged the state’s hold in the North, alternately to al Qaeda and Iran. The challenge for us in the West is to be able to live with the threat of organized terrorism without assuming its involvement in any given act of anti-state violence – and without blindly accepting, when we look to other governments’ responses, that their fights are the same as ours.

— Steve Clemons

Comments

41 comments on “Thinking About Terrorism

  1. JohnH says:

    “Marcus is bat-shit-crazy! Why aren’t you guys simply saying that?”
    I think he represents the views of the “religious” nationalist regime in Israel quite well. They are all bat-shit-crazy. And we worry about non-existent Iranian nukes?

    Reply

  2. JohnH says:

    “We of course don’t wish to welcome acts of terrorism, particularly on our own soil.” But militarist elements in the US and Israel need such absurd acts to justify massive military operations in Iraq or AfPak or in the West Bank and Gaza…
    When the US or Israel decides to plop down in someone else’s living room, armed to the teeth, a pull back does not represent appeasement. Rather, it signifies that policy makers have finally come to their senses.

    Reply

  3. DavidT says:

    Steve,
    I was unsettled by this post when I read it a few days ago.
    That’s because you connect two different issues in a way that
    I find bothersome and wonder whether you really realize the
    logic you use. You argue that if the reason for a particular
    egregious act is a particular policy the that is evidence that
    this policy is incoherent or harmful. Our policy vis-a-vis
    Pakistan may be in our interests and may not be. I just don’t
    know enough about the situation or the area or how drone
    attacks affect groups that might be sympathetic to our
    approach or … But to say that the Times Square apparant
    attempt is evidence on one side or the other befuddles me.
    We of course don’t wish to welcome acts of terrorism,
    particularly on our own soil. But to suggest that those acts
    should push us in their direction is strange to me. Should, for
    example, the bludgeoning on the Senate floor of Senator
    Charles Sumner have been evidence that Northerners should
    have been more accepting of Southern slavery policies?
    Should the bombing of Abortion clinics tell us that we should
    reexamine whether to continue providing abortion options to
    pregnant women?

    Reply

  4. arthurdecco says:

    John H said: “arthurdecco may downplay the threat of radical Judaism, but it’s not a joking matter.”
    You mistook my truth-telling for sarcasm, John H.
    (The internet is such a limited means of expression for most of us, isn’t it?)

    Reply

  5. JohnH says:

    Marcus does credit to the “religious” nationalist mentality on display here every day. Nothing like, “Granted , there were one or two gratuitous firings of rubber – coated bullets,” to convince people of the inherent civility of his ilk…

    Reply

  6. marcus says:

    Anybody want to get to the truth….follow and watch POS’s video links about israeli brutality-HAHAHAHAHAHA LOL IS THAT ALL YOU GOT ?
    Rodney King anyone ? I’ve never seen ANYTHING even coming remotely close to the King beating coming from the IDF or israeli police.Even though it’s maybe one of the most videoed military-police in the world.
    Their’s worse beat downs by the police on occassion in every big city and plenty of police shootings every year.Plenty,all the time.
    My favorite is titeled “Israeli soliders torture, ,blind,terrified palestinian children….. and then shoot their mothers in the back” It’s a classic,we get to see a solider-policeman (they have to be both) grab a kid by the collar or wrist and detain him. No shit,, theres nothing much worse than that ..and some other guy got slapped across the face 3 or 4 times
    Granted , there were one or two gratuitous firings of rubber – coated bullets ……………………………………………………………………………… Hardly rises to the level of Nuremburg.
    BTW I have never seen or heard of a gazan being hungry !(I’ve got hungrier people living around me) so whats all this BS about the farms-BS that’s what it is

    Reply

  7. JohnH says:

    Marcus paraphrased-“because Jews have suffered greatly in the past, Israel can do anything it damn well pleases, ANYTHING.”
    With crazies like this, it’s no surprise there’s no peace in the ME. But do American taxpayer’s have to underwrite this lunacy?

    Reply

  8. PissedOffAmerican says:

    http://palsolidarity.org/2010/05/12264
    That April day Emad Fakha had taken three of his four children to help in the fields after school, something they enjoyed, a treat. The children had climbed into the

    Reply

  9. PissedOffAmerican says:

    http://ingaza.wordpress.com/
    The buffer zone renders inaccessible approximately 30 percent of Gaza

    Reply

  10. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Israeli military shoot dead a Gaza farmer
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSECq3kxT4I
    and attack fishermen
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAUzugKX1AE

    Reply

  11. marcus says:

    “chosen” to be the victims
    ” to endure
    ” to protect the world
    ” to prove that never again means never again.

    Reply

  12. jdledell says:

    “jd, this is the old “more die from traffic accidents” excuse…”
    Nadine – the number I gave you of 125,000 are not accidents – it is the number of murders committed in the US over the last 8 years. The FBI statistics show 15,000 to 17,000 murders annually in the US. The number of 200-250 annually for Israel are also deliberate murders – not accidents.

    Reply

  13. marcus says:

    JohnH; Your willful blindess to history and context is predictable.
    Until your ancestors have been through the same things as jews have been “chosen” to endure,you have no right to even comment on Israel.
    Jews have been “chosen”to be the victims of arab violence off and on for thousands of years,genocides you have never even heard of.
    Israelis have had a military advantage for forty years,but have not forgotten the previous forty centuries,have you ?
    BTW; I believe Israel should destroy ALL of its nukes…..when EVERY other country in the world has done the same , not before, because they are “chosen” ,chosen to protect the world against nuke proliferation ie; Iraq and Syria and probably Iran(I guess the west can thank Israel later) and “chosen” to prove that never again, means never again.

    Reply

  14. marcus says:

    ” who the hell are we,you arent one of us ”
    Who the hell are you ?
    stormfront ?
    Who are you carroll and who is “us”
    Are you a militia momma ?
    Are you al queda ?
    Is your “us” the group you belong to, in your head ?
    Just curious. hey wheres your gimp ?

    Reply

  15. marcus says:

    JohnH;
    you said that potentially nuclear armed settler violence could lead to WW3 – you then provided a link about some graffitti !!
    IS this a joke.

    Reply

  16. marcus says:

    Nadine, btw here in Canada we simply do not have the overt nazi types like carroll, NOWHERE NEAR the mainstream.
    Her types are the polar opposite of progressives here,in fact the only places you find YAHOOS like that are DEEP in the woods. We did have one guy,ernst zundel (probably a relative of carroll) but he was deported to germany to face trial and is in jail over there.
    Maybe its your legacy of slavery or the public education system
    We never had any KKK either.I guess were just better people.

    Reply

  17. nadine says:

    jd, this is the old “more die from traffic accidents” excuse. We don’t regard deliberate murder the same as accidents. Those who die from terrorism die by murder, and if the numbers aren’t much higher it isn’t for want of trying on the part of the terrorists. You must know that 9 out of 10 Palestinian suicide bombers have been stopped before they got a chance to go ka-boom in the middle of an Israeli shopping mall or restaurant.
    Incidentally, your count of the victims of Islamist terror omits the Muslim victims. Between Algeria, Iraq, and Af/Pak they make up over 95% of the total.

    Reply

  18. JohnH says:

    Popping the violent Arab myth: Nationmaster compiles murder rates from countries around the world. The highest ranked Arab country is Yemen, which ranks just below the United States in murders per capita. The second highest is Tunisia, which ranks below all large European countries and Canada.
    http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/cri_mur_percap-crime-murders-per-capita
    Violent Arabs? Just more hasbara.
    However, Arabs can become violent when they’re subjected to an occupation as in Iraq and Palestine.

    Reply

  19. JohnH says:

    “Mosque spray-painted with Hebrew graffiti in West Bank village; Palestinians point to settlers.”
    http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/news/mosque-spray-painted-with-hebrew-graffiti-in-west-bank-village-palestinians-point-to-settlers-1.284281
    Echoes of Germany in the 1930s?
    And what hallucinogen has marcus been drinking? “Israel can help show the muslims how to practice their religon in a modern way,to help them intergrate into the modern world, specifically how to deal with racism from nazis, without resorting to violence.”
    Seems to me that Israel first needs to show Zionist “religious” nationalists how to practice their religion in a modern, non-violent manner.

    Reply

  20. marcus says:

    Throughout recorded history the arabs contact with jews has given them the trappings of civilization . The jews have always been the literate,tech-commercial-industrial savvy,part of the population. Even the arab mathemeticians,poets,scientists were forced jewish converts or their decendants.
    This historical precedent is the anwser to the worlds problem with the fanatic islamic ishmaelites, ISRAEL is the example that must be exalted and emulated throughout the region.
    Israel is the bridge between the arabs and the western world.
    Israel can lift the regions economy as they are trying to do in the west bank today (for example the arabs there today have the highest literacy rate in the arab world and the lowest infant mortality rate.
    Israel as the first democracy in the region and is the envy of millions of freedom fighters in the arab world.
    Israels spy agency (except maybe englands)is the best in the world to help deal with the free worlds greatest threats.
    And since judaism is the foundational religon from which islam derives,Israel can help show the muslims how to practice their religon in a modern way,to help them intergrate into the modern world (specifically how to deal with racism from nazis,without resorting to violence- peolpe like CARROLL are the primary street-level causes of arab alienation and resentment.Its people like her that feeds the hate-constant drone of race-hatred-that pisses-off everyone.People like her who embrace race hatred never limit their hate to just one ethnic group-they have,they have ALWAYS had a heirarchy of hate jews,blacks,asians , you name it,its just a matter of degree . One Nazi hates jews more than blacks or vice versa,but they all have their lists. They are segregationists who attempt to divide the country by race instead of the issues.not very helpful,me thinks.
    The lions of Judah will show the arabs that they will never be enslaved by Islam,what will happen in europe and eventually America is not known,but for sure; Bowing to arab tyrants or trying to weaken Israel is counter-productive.

    Reply

  21. jdledell says:

    Nadine – Your fixation with Islamic terrorism(shared unfortunately by too many Americans) is totally out of proportion with it’s real impact.
    Since 9/11/2001 when terrorism killed 3,000 Americans those fearful Islamists have successfully killed another ZERO Americans. Meanwhile approximately 125,000 Americans have been murdered by fellow Americans. Are we spending trillions of dollars fighting this latter menace?
    Islamic terrorism is being used as a bogeyman to take attention away from the real problems the US and other countries, including Israel, are facing. Israel records roughly 200-250 murders/year, losses greater than by Palesinian terrorism. How much money, media and government attention is devoted toward domestic murders versus foreign murders.
    The excuse that is always broght up is that there is nothing that can be done to stop local murders – it’s part of human nature and culture. I am not advocating the people and countries should not defend themselves but we should keep our perspectives straight when designing strategies and allocating resources.

    Reply

  22. JohnH says:

    arthurdecco may downplay the threat of radical Judaism, but it’s not a joking matter. What if the government (and Israel’s nukes) fall to a settler government?
    And then there’s this: “The Mideast is on tenterhooks. Jordan is terrified that far rightwing Israeli foreign minister Avigdor Lieberman will attempt to ethnically cleanse the Palestinians and displace them to Jordan. They also fear that the Jordan river will be dried up by extensive Israeli siphoning. Lebanon is jittery about another attack on Beirut. Iran has pledged to defend Syria if the Israelis attack Damascus, over the alleged transfer to Lebanese Shiite party-militia Hizbullah of SCUD missiles.”
    http://www.juancole.com/2010/05/israeli-settler-terrorists-plan-more-mosque-burnings.html
    The ideology driven “religious” nationalists in charge of the Israeli government are very capable of setting off WWIII.

    Reply

  23. arthurdecco says:

    Dan Kervick said, “…these opportunistic attempts to raise fears of Shia phantoms might already have had the effect of making Americans take their eyes of the one small crowd in that region that has proven consistently to be a real, concrete threat to Americans: irregular groups of militant *Sunni* Salafist jihadists, and their confederates around the world.”
    Geez Dan, All this time I thought it was the Zionist Fascists of Israel “and their confederates around the world” who were the “real, concrete threat to Americans”.

    Reply

  24. Dan Kervick says:

    “Dan, from you this statement is a tautology, because you refuse to notice any region without an American army.”
    Bullshit Nadine. Stick to the subject, and don’t reduce your arguments to lazy cable TV parodies. The assertion you made about Middle East convulsions is an empirical assertion, and it should be looked at as such.
    The Middle East has been wracked by violence over the past century. There have been revolutions in Egypt and Iran, several assassinations, a major war between Iran and Iraq, a Suez crisis, a few wars in Lebanon, four military takeovers in Turkey, a civil war in Yemen, a civil war in Oman, civil wars and two invasions in Afghanistan, coups and assassinations in Pakistan, several wars between Israel and its neighbors, several wars in North Africa, etc. And I know I’m forgetting a lot.
    Some of these violent episodes have clearly been prompted or stimulated by western intervention; others clearly have not; and for others the degree to which western intervention played a causal role is debatable.
    Now it seems to me that, as a matter of fact, the Middle East is currently *relatively* peaceful and stable by the standards of recent history, except primarily for those countries in which the US is engaged militarily. The idea that the Muslim world is “convulsing” just doesn’t seem to be born out by facts on the ground. Most of its governments seem secure, and in no imminent danger of toppling. And certainly *most* of its people, by far, are not now engaged in hostilities, and do not face daily imminent threats of being ravaged by the effects of war.
    And with regard to those other places on the periphery of the region where there is conflict – Chechnya, Somalia, and Sudan – the conflict has nothing to do with any Shia-Sunni business, but involves either a conflict between Muslim and non-Muslim groups or between rival Sunni Muslim groups.
    Really violent intra-Muslim conflict, as it currently exists, seems to have much more to do with the struggle between militant Salafist Sunni groups and almost everyone else – including mainstream Sunni Muslim governing groups and non-militant Sunni Islamist groups – then with any Shia-Sunni conflict. It also has something to with some lingering effects of the pan-Arab nationalist movement in North Africa.
    Your claim that the region is being convulsed by Sunni-Shia strife has almost nothing to be said for it. The government of Yemen is dealing with a few rebel groups, and that’s about it. But the Sunni-Shia tall stories are a dangerous delusion to boot, since these opportunistic attempts to raise fears of Shia phantoms might already have had the effect of making Americans take their eyes of the one small crowd in that region that has proven consistently to be a real, concrete threat to Americans: irregular groups of militant *Sunni* Salafist jihadists, and their confederates around the world.

    Reply

  25. JohnH says:

    Nadine attributes everything bad that happens in the Arab world to “radical Islam,” a convenient framing for Zionists who wish to continue stealing land from the “unchosen,” Palestinians.
    In reality, every situation is different. There is no unified “radical Islamic movement.” What’s key here is that there are extremely repressive governments which do not allow their people to get legitimate grievances addressed. That’s when a population becomes increasingly radicalized, as in the Occupied Territories. And each situation concentrates on concrete local grievances, not ideology, or global terrorism. Nonetheless a common underlying theme is the presence of repressive governments closely allied with the US.
    Resistance is often framed in terms of Islam, in part because, like all religions, it stands for justice. And, in part, because people are denied freedom of assembly, except for religious purposes. As a result, Islam is also a common underlying theme.
    But to conflate Kyrgyz resistance with Palestinian resistance under the banner of “radical Islam” just shows how clueless you are.
    Sad that anything other than a simplistic answer will go over Nadine’s head.

    Reply

  26. Carroll says:

    Posted by nadine, May 05 2010, 8:58PM – Link
    “At least prepare your excuses for the next time we get hit — ”
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Who the hell is ‘we’?… you aren’t one of us.

    Reply

  27. nadine says:

    Many more Arab countries have engaged or are engaging in severe repression of Islamist movements in order to stay in power, such as Egypt’s repression of the Muslim Brotherhood, Saudi Arabia’s problems with al Qaeda, or Hafez al Assad’s mass murder in Hama in 1982. Then there is Hizbullah in Lebanon, and Hamas in Gaza. I also didn’t mention the about 2 million who died in the Iran-Iraq war, which we did not start (our part was to keep Iraq from losing too fast). That doesn’t even mention any of the Israel/Pal conflicts.
    Not exactly a peaceful region, with or without American troops. There are deep internal fissures in most of the Arab states, and lots of them fall on the nationalist/Islamist divide. This is just stuff you notice when you aren’t ideologically committed to the idea that only America can make wars in the world.

    Reply

  28. JohnH says:

    There are 22 countries in the Arab League. Nadine can name 3 countries that are experiencing turmoil or have in the past. Therefore, “the whole Muslim world is convulsing.” Right!
    The May 10 issue issue of The Nation talks about Kyrgyzstan: “if state repression of religion continues at this pace and there are not political channels for representing Muslim grievances, we are likely to witness radicalization.”
    And, “like other Central Asian despots, Bakiyev received lucrative American rewards for highlighting, or even exaggerating, the threat of terrorism. US Ambassador Tatian Gfoeller underscored this support in October, at the opening of a Kyrgyz special forces complex in Tokmok, where she said, “Brand-new, modern military equipment–trucks, tactical gear, ambulance, night sights, body armor and much more–are arriving in Kyrgyszstan daily and being distributed to Kyrgyzstan’s armed forces.”
    Another article goes on to describe widespread corruption, including sole source fuel contracts to Bagram and Manas air bases issued by DOD. Owners of the company holding the contract cannot be identified, but the ruling family profits enormously, probably along with unnamed American partners, most likely high officials in the Bush administration.
    Like I said earlier, “if there were a strategy to stop terrorism, it would be to discontinue policies that spawn terrorists.” But that would prevent insiders from realizing huge profits, so the government can’t possibly do that!

    Reply

  29. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Well, bottom line, if a foreign nation was to inundate the United States with troops, drone aircraft, military pollution, radioactive munitions dust, spooks, and dead kin, you could count me in to launch an attack on THEIR shores.
    But hey, that’d make me a patriot, not a terrorist. Funny how that works, eh?

    Reply

  30. Fany says:

    Dan, from you this statement is a tautology, because you refuse to notice any region without an American army. Hey, we’re not there, so it must be peaceful, right? Notice the “peace and quiet” of Algeria, Yemen or Lebanon in the last twenty years?

    Reply

  31. nadine says:

    Dan, from you this statement is a tautology, because you refuse to notice any region without an American army. Hey, we’re not there, so it must be peaceful, right? Notice the “peace and quiet” of Algeria, Yemen or Lebanon in the last twenty years?

    Reply

  32. Dan Kervick says:

    The Islamic world is not “convulsing”. Except for those places where destabilizing US armies have been inserted, the Islamic world is probably more peaceful on the whole than it has been in a century.

    Reply

  33. nadine says:

    DonS, the whole Muslim world is convulsing as the Islamists, both Sunni and Shia, fight the old nationalist regimes for control. And I have a news flash for you: NONE of them give a rat’s ass about American corporate corruption; their own regime corruption is ten times worse.
    You just have an ideological idee fixe that America is the root of all the problems on the globe and that we don’t have any ideological enemies. 9/11 made this pretense harder, but you retreat to pretending that al Qaeda is invented or 30 guys in a cave somewhere, no more.
    This is pure myopic BS. It leaves you pretending that every jihadist is some lone wolf (even if he says he’s Taliban) or wishing, a la Contessa Brewer, that he was some kind of right-wing militia white guy. And if it’s absolutely impossible to pretend, as in the case of Major “Soldier of Allah” Nissan Hadal, then you just wantto ignore the whole subject.
    Look. This is not about us. It’s about THEM and who gets to rule in Pakistan and Saudi Arabia and Iraq and Egypt, the current secular nationalist regimes or a revolutionary totalitarian Islamist regime. This fight goes one where we are involved – Saudi, Iraq, Afghanistan, Gaza – and where we are not – Algria, Egypt, Lebanon, Pakistan, Yemen. Iran is feeding the fires by supplying the Islamist side in lots of places.
    I know it’s hard for you to believe that anybody in the world can have a fight without it’s being America’s fault, but try. At least prepare your excuses for the next time we get hit — it’s a matter of time with clowns like Holder in charger. As far as I can see, he has taken us out of the business of collecting intelligence. Now we either kill people with predator drones or we Mirandize them. It’s crazy.

    Reply

  34. Dan Kervick says:

    “The most recent terrorist attempt to attack New York on Saturday has got me thinking in the last few days.”
    Me too. I thought, “They missed me again.”

    Reply

  35. JohnH says:

    Nadine is simply trying to deflect the blame from Israeli occupation and from America’s Afghan occupation to “radical Islam.” In turn she hopes to generate support for Israel and its brutalization of Arabs by conflating America’s battle with Israel’s.
    Frankly, if there were a strategy to stop terrorism, it would be to discontinue policies that spawn terrorists.
    I mean, exactly what is the US doing in Afghanistan anyway? Like the totally discredited Iraqi misadventure, I have yet to see any official rationales that could withstand scrutiny. We’re supposed to be there to fight the 100 remaining al Qaeda? To promote democracy through fraudulent elections?
    Give me a break!

    Reply

  36. DonS says:

    Nadine, you are so full of BS. You focus in on the micro picture of the micro problem, relative to the big picture outlined by Don Bacon. You can masquerade as madam clear eyed realist, but the fact is that obsession with Islamist terrorism feeds into the neocon right wing agenda. Hey, Joe Liberman’s instant fix for dealing with ‘terrorists’ . . . deprive them of Miranda warnings, even if they are American citizens . . . cagely defines only ‘terrorists’ associated with ‘foreign’ groups. Right wing militias would however be protected under law. And don’t try to call Liberman a ‘liberal’. We know exactly who he serves, and that aligns with the neocon cabal.
    Mico focusing on Islamist terrorists is a huge diversionary ploy, no matter how completely is is sucked up by the conventional wisdom of the system, the MSM, and of course the political reps. It’s much easier to cower before the bogey man . . . Islamists fill the niche that Communists did for the power elite for so many decades. An external enemy to grease skids of a fear based system, while the middle class of America sinks further into fear, ignorance, and penury.
    So while there may be no direct right wing zionist connection, there are neocon fingerprints all over your comment.

    Reply

  37. nadine says:

    We will continue to have a complete lack of “strategic outlook” until this administration can bring itself to utter the words “radical Islamism”. You can’t have strategy if you can’t even name the ideology that drives the enemy.

    Reply

  38. JohnH says:

    During the Cold War, anyone who took up arms to oppose an oppressive government was labeled a communist, except in Afghanistan, where they were called freedom fighters. Now they’re all called Al Qaeda, except in the Western Hemisphere where they’re called friends of Chavez.
    Earlier in the decade, Algeria’s police state had problems with “Al Qaeda.” When all was said and done, most of the fighters were found to be responding to local grievances.
    Don Bacon is right. Most of this fear mongering is done to advance careers in “security” services and to increase the profits of special interests, including the corporate media, where terrorism captures the attention of viewers.
    If the American revolution were being fought today, England would definitely have trumpeted the news that George Washington and Samuel Adams had links to Al Qaeda.

    Reply

  39. Don Bacon says:

    re: “the real threat of organized terrorism”
    The current government-directed obsession with terrorism, unique to America, is of course designed to (1) foster the financial health of various corporations and government agencies and (2) take American minds off of more serious matters, both life-threatening and otherwise, that Americans ought to be concerned with. These include education, health care, environment, racial & other inequalities, and employment.
    The fact is that the terrorism risk to the average American statistically ranks somewhere below bath-tub slips and lightning strikes, and nowhere near real risks such as auto accidents, cancer and heart attacks.
    Why can’t the humungous military budget be reduced? Terrorism. Why do we have intrusive checkpoint on US highways? Terrorism. Why have civil liberties been taken away? Terrorism. Why is the US fighting endless wars in Asia and Africa? Terrorism.
    It works for them– there’s so much money in it.

    Reply

  40. charlie says:

    What I would look at is why the pakistani military is running around trying to clean up every trace of this guy in Pakistan.
    His father, a air vice-marshall, is already in hiding. Where are the rest of his family and friends. Wife and children have disappeared.
    How much do you want to be we don’t have a complete staff directory of the ISI?

    Reply

Add your comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *