Little Tidbits from Denver

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The Liberal Lion Returns — Senator Kennedy, who turbo-charged Sen. Obama’s bid for the Democratic nomination with his endorsement in January, has been out of the public spotlight with a malignant brain tumor, is reportedly scheduled to speak on the opening night of the Democratic convention. For Massachusetts delegates and beyond, it might rank with Paul Pierce’s comeback in Game 1.
The Loquacious Lion’s Past — Democratic Vice Presidential Candidate Joe Biden not only overcame innumerable struggles over the course of his life, the man who is now known to be be quite verbose, leading to the occassional political gaffe, has come a long way since his youth. From the Irish Times:

Until his late teens, he suffered from a stutter so severe that he was excused from public speaking in school but, quoting Yeats and Emerson in front of the mirror for hours on end, he overcame it to become one of the most loquacious figures in American public life today.

His addition to the ticket might also help with American Jewish voters
Families Feud Again — The Obama and Clinton camps are warring again. Speaking assignments for Bill are part of the tension.
And McCain is proactively capitalizing on this wedge with ads like this one. It goes:

“I’m a proud Hillary Clinton Democrat,” says Debra Bartoshevich.
“Now in a first for me, I’m supporting a Republican,” she says, replacing the Clinton sign she’s holding with a McCain sign. “I respect his maverick and independent streak. He’s the one with the experience and judgment.”
“A lot of Democrats will vote McCain,” she concludes. “It’s OK, really.”

Democrats Lament Georgia’s Plight — Yesterday at a National Democratic Institute Reception for Global Leaders, DNC Chairman Howard Dean and Democratic Speaker Nancy Pelosi both addressed the reception of some 500 international audience and made particular gestures to the Georgian delegation expressing their sympathy and support for their democratic aspirations, but pledging no material support other than investigative delegations and hearings. I’m sure the Georgians thought their words hollow but it was still the right move.
— Sameer Lalwani

Comments

17 comments on “Little Tidbits from Denver

  1. Kathleen says:

    pauline…check out the last sentence…TidBits from the right…
    McCAIN TO PICK RONALD REAGAN AS VP
    By R J Shulman
    PHOENIX — Bucking all of the predictions regarding his choice of a running mate, Senator John McCain will choose Ronald Reagan to run as his Vice President, the Post Times Sun Dispatch learned today. “This is a brilliant move,” said Charles Schneider, a strategist for the Republican Party, “as it will bring all the conservatives and Reagan Democrats to the polls to vote for McCain.” “The choice of Reagan is also a positive for McCain because he will look young and vigorous compared to Reagan and he will look more attentive,” Schneider said. “I couldn’t have suggested a better choice,” said Dick Cheney, “except for me, of course.”
    Democratic political strategist James Carville said, “I can’t believe what those Republicans will dig up to win this election.” Barack Obama said he had no comment as he would like to keep the tone of the campaign above board and above ground.
    “There is nothing in the Constitution that says you have to be alive to be the Vice President,” said Alan Dershowitz, Harvard Law Professor, ” I guess our founding fathers didn’t think future generations would be so unscrupulous and so dumb.” “I don’t think it’s bad to choosicate a Vice President without a pulse,” President [sic] Bush said, “after all, I have a Vice President without a heart.”

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  2. Kathleen says:

    pauline…check out the last sentence…tidbits from the right…
    McCAIN TO PICK RONALD REAGAN AS VP
    By R J Shulman
    PHOENIX — Bucking all of the predictions regarding his choice of a running mate, Senator John McCain will choose Ronald Reagan to run as his Vice President, the Post Times Sun Dispatch learned today. “This is a brilliant move,” said Charles Schneider, a strategist for the Republican Party, “as it will bring all the conservatives and Reagan Democrats to the polls to vote for McCain.” “The choice of Reagan is also a positive for McCain because he will look young and vigorous compared to Reagan and he will look more attentive,” Schneider said. “I couldn’t have suggested a better choice,” said Dick Cheney, “except for me, of course.”
    Democratic political strategist James Carville said, “I can’t believe what those Republicans will dig up to win this election.” Barack Obama said he had no comment as he would like to keep the tone of the campaign above board and above ground.
    “There is nothing in the Constitution that says you have to be alive to be the Vice President,” said Alan Dershowitz, Harvard Law Professor, ” I guess our founding fathers didn’t think future generations would be so unscrupulous and so dumb.” “I don’t think it’s bad to choosicate a Vice President without a pulse,” President [sic] Bush said, “after all, I have a Vice President without a heart.”

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  3. Kathleen says:

    Mr.Murder… you were there…you got the picture…me too. POA.. I’ll say..
    WigWag..I don’t hiss at you… I disagree about the Palestine-Israel issue, but I don’t hiss at you….
    I think tommorrow is Steve’s birthday…HP,S.

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  4. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Well, considering that Gore lost to a monkey, I suppose anything is possible.

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  5. Paul Norheim says:

    And even Michelle Obama`s speech could be seen as a first step
    to advance her chances in a future presidential race. (And who
    knows, perhaps she`ll loose one day for a Korean-American man,
    etc….)

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  6. Mr.Murder says:

    The Daley dynasty takes over again. The same radicals who helped ratfuck the ’68 convention are now on think tanks and ngo boards with the future ‘president’ of the only first world nation with no universal health coverage.
    The convention has the momentum of a leaking tire.

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  7. Paul Norheim says:

    I watched the show at CNN. It was very weird. It looked like a very
    old monarchic ritual in a modern, American disguise, with the
    help of a democratic-carnevalesque scenography and costumes,
    and with four dynasties in different roles:
    The Bush dynasty on its way out in disgrace; the Clinton dynasty
    outmaneuvered – and on the main stage: the dying Kennedy
    dynasty handing over the throne to the coming Obama dynasty.
    The last chapter in this transfer of power between families is
    probably not written – one day the Clintons, perhaps even the
    Bush family may return.

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  8. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “And I appreciate the applause. When commenting at the Washington Note I get mostly hisses and cat calls, and that’s when people are feeling polite”
    Theres always some jerk in the crowd that somehow thinks the underdog isn’t the underdog for a reason.
    CNN, eh, Wigwag? Ya know, for someone that “doesn’t watch cable news”, you sure cite it alot.

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  9. WigWag says:

    First night of the Democratic Convention in a nut shell:
    Discussion about the future of America: None.
    Critique of the Bush Presidency: None.
    Like Obama himself, the night was short on substance and high on the personality cult stuff:
    Caroline Kennedy: Let’s celebrate Me! And My life story!
    Ted Kennedy: Let’s celebrate ME! And my life story!
    Michelle Obama: Lets celebrate ME! And my life story!
    It was hard to tell if it was a political convention or a freaking LifeTime TV special.
    But Jim Leech was good.

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  10. WigWag says:

    Well the first night of the Democratic Convention just ended and this is how CNN summed it up,
    “I simply cannot understand why the people who planned this convention let it go on for hour after hour with nothing substantive going on.”
    “I think they did a very poor job tonight.”
    David Gergen
    August 25, 2008
    Bush is the least popular president in modern history. He was hardly mentioned at all.
    There was virtually no mention of:
    1)Health care
    2)The economy
    3)Foreign policy
    4)Iraq
    5)The Middle East
    6)Europe
    7)Russia
    8)Tax policy
    9)The mortgage crisis
    10) Gas prices.
    Tuesday’s Hillary’s night. Wenesday’s Bill’s night. I am sure that they will compliment Obama alot and I am sure that they will be substantive.
    But shouldn’t something of consequence be said on the first night of a national convention.
    Sorry you Obama supporters. The grade for the first night of your convention (despite the great speech by Kennedy and the okay speech by Michelle Obama) is C-

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  11. rawdawgbuffalo says:

    well it should be interesting, i mean 2 nights of the Clinton klan and folk from MICH and FLA

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  12. WigWag says:

    just helping out; thanks for just helping out. And I appreciate the applause. When commenting at the Washington Note I get mostly hisses and cat calls, and that’s when people are feeling polite.

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  13. just helping out says:

    I would like to add for our esteemed commenter, the illustrious WigWag (applause), that Joe Biden’s wife’s name is Jill Tracy JACOBS! (ewwww, ooooo, aaaah)
    So WigWag’s honoured attempt at making the anti-Semites who comment here cringe, will, I hope, be turned into fits of apoplexy with the above revealing information.
    ! JACOBS !

    Reply

  14. questions says:

    Oh, and remember that when McCain challenges party lines, he’s a “maverick”, (not that he often does challenge), but when Obama challenges party lines, he “can’t be trusted”. What we get out of these people, and what we associate with them, comes from more than media and advertising repetition. The candidates themselves have to be able to support the characterization. Obama is too something or other to be a “Maverick”. And that something or other engenders distrust in a lot of people. We can’t TRUST McCain if he’s a MAVERICK, yet we trust his distrustfulness.
    McCain gets basic facts WRONG routinely. Obama pauses a lot when he talks, but aside from rare gaffes from fatigue (the confusion of “states” and “contests” in the primary), he gets facts right. Who is thought of as the ignorant candidate?
    Rapaille picks up on these underlying issues.

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  15. WigWag says:

    Thanks Mr. Lawlwani for the update and for the links which I enjoyed reading.
    I especially enjoyed reading your link to Haaretz and to seeing these remarks from Steve Grossman:
    “According to Grossman, American Jews “still don’t know him well. If every American Jew had a possibility to talk to Barak Obama, they would agree with him on most of the issues. That’s what Thursday night is for, that’s what elections are for,” he said, in a reference to Obama’s scheduled speech accepting the party’s nomination.
    I’ve been president of AIPAC for 4 years, and I devoted my life to those relations, and he has the ability to articulate those values to American people, to be able to say: ‘It’s important to strengthen the Israeli-American relationship.'”
    A number of prominent delegates said the choice of Senator Joe Biden would provide a strong boost to Obama support among American Jews. “For Jews he’s a mishpucheh,” Oregon Senator Ron Wyden said of Biden, using the Yiddish version of the Hebrew word for family.”
    Wow, it seems like just a few short months ago we were debating whether Senator Obama would bring a fresh perspective to the Middle East. Some astute Washington Note readers thought Senator Obama’s views would be more nuanced and more even handed. But I guess not.
    With Biden on board, I’m actually more and more convinced that Obama will tilt even more strongly towards Israel than either President Bush or John McCain.
    Who would have thunk it?

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  16. questions says:

    Carsick, read up on Clotaire Rapaille. He’s a marketer who has come up with an interesting characterization of what motivates us to buy things. I think the Times Sunday Mag. ran a piece on him a few years ago. His work may well explain the “usual bumper sticker” thing.

    Reply

  17. carsick says:

    In recently reported focus groups, some of the respondents claimed they want more than just rhetoric from Obama and want him to spell out some multi-point plans (guess they don’t have web access).
    And yet, when asked why they like McCain it is the usual bumper sticker “Maverick” or “Independent.”
    Goose/gander; pot/kettle…or just voters searching for reasons (however far fetched) to justify their low information proclivities.
    Sometimes, you expect people actually vote for the issues they feel strongly about, and sometimes you are discouraged to find they feel strongly about who they would like to have a beer with.

    Reply

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