Scooter Libby Sentenced. . .

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cheney libby.jpg
And the word is 30 months in prison and a fine of $250,000.
Obstruction of federal investigations is serious. I do feel somewhat badly for Libby in this — as he’s clearly taking much of the heat for this to protect Cheney, who many think should be paying the fine and doing the time.
— Steve Clemons

Comments

59 comments on “Scooter Libby Sentenced. . .

  1. Sandy says:

    OMG, I feared that was true! War criminals!

    Reply

  2. Mr.Murder says:

    Paul Johnson and Todd Staheli were killed when Brewster was outed.

    Reply

  3. Mike Murphy says:

    Don’t give Scooter 30 months. Give him the Judith Miller treatment. Sentence him to prison “Until you tell us the complete who, what when, and where.”

    Reply

  4. Sandy says:

    I guess I’m not following you, David N. You agree about impeachment, then, right?
    About Libby, here’s a must read:
    LAST PLAMEGATE WORRY FOR BUSH-CHENEY
    by ROBERT PARRY
    June 6, 2007
    at consortiumnews.com

    Reply

  5. David N says:

    Sandy:
    Stop futzing around and tell us what you think!!!
    Anyway, here’s an idea that would be nice to get into the halls of Congress.
    There is a school of thought that says that the Democrats don’t want to impeach Bush/Cheney (it would have to be both) because they’ll do better in the election next year if B/C are still ruining the country.
    Aside from the moral poverty of such a stance, and even aside from whether they have the votes or not, there is the view that if they bring articles of impeachment, and show the country how B/C have violated the law, the Constitution, and their oaths of office so many times and so many ways (in a way, the sheer scope of their crimes protects them; who can keep them all straight!!), then they can show the culpibility of the entire Republican party in its illegal power grabs and voter fraud and userpation of the government.
    That would make an even better campaign slogan than just running against Bush, when the Republicans will be running against him — or trying to — too.
    Even the media shills will have a problem spinning that for their corporate masters.

    Reply

  6. Sandy says:

    If you aren’t enthusiastic about impeachment, why not?
    Are you just going to wait for Bush & Cheney to bomb Iran and send us all further down the drain?
    If you think that’s hysterical, how about wandering over to Counterpunch today and reading the first two articles.
    Here’s one:
    http://www.counterpunch.com/leupp06062007.html

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  7. Sandy says:

    I think it’s obvious that we can write off the rule of law and respect for the Constitution being taken seriously by the Bush Cheney Regime.
    What frustrates me is the short-sightedness, or fear, or self-servingness (i.e., better for 2008 to leave it alone?) of the Democrats who won’t listen to the American people about impeachment of both Bush and Cheney. Or, at the very least, Cheney, then, as Kucinich has proffered.
    Okay, okay, maybe there AREN’T enough votes! DO THEY NOT SEE that by putting before the public the multiple CHARGES against these criminals….that that ALONE would present a damning case against this administration? And, would take care of its “legacy” concerns? Why is the public….we, the people, being ignored?
    Over at AfterDowningStreet.org, a fellow today was quoting Dave Lindorff, for example: (please consider)
    “…author and journalist Dave Lindorff believes the impeachment process would bring to light enough abuses of presidential power to derail his second term.
    “Once his crimes are laid out on national television, he’ll be thrown overboard by his own party, or, like Nixon, he’ll strike a deal to leave office,” predicted Lindorff, Last year, the two-time Fulbright scholar co-authored The Case for Impeachment: The Legal Argument for Removing President George W. Bush from Office, produced by Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press.
    “The congressional leadership is moving very slow at this point,” he said. “But things tend to move fast in Congress once they do move, so I can’t say, no, it won’t happen.
    Eleven states are considering impeachment resolutions now, and a Newsweek poll last October showed that 53 percent of the American public favor impeachment.”
    With emphasis on: ONCE BUSH/CHENEY’S CRIMES ARE LAID OUT ON NATIONAL TELEVISION….
    Don’t YOU believe that would change dramatically the next GOP debate…at the very least?

    Reply

  8. David N says:

    Thanks for the responses — and corrections.
    As Gore pointed out in his latest book, it helps to know someone’s paying attention.
    Now, if only someone who works on Capitol Hill would pay attention to the truth, and the American people.
    Trouble is, the truth doesn’t pay as well as the corporations.

    Reply

  9. Sandy says:

    I agree with David N. and POA (and, thanks, POA for those CNN deleted comments–the nerve! Glad you caught ’em at it…again.) how refreshing it would be if this country could return to actually valuing the “rule of law”.
    Just LOOK at the incredible deterioration of “rule of law”….adhering to, and valuing, the Constitution…in the last six years! Quite astounding, really. Starting with the Supremes anointing Bush as President…acting with political bias and interfering…superceding/halting an American election… shockingly. All downhill from there on. Shamefacedly. Scalia going hunting with Cheney without recusing himself on a major case, etc. etc.
    My theory is that, unfortunately, the REASON it would be impossibly difficult to address, as David N. says “… the way that the entire legal system in the United States is broken….” is that old saw, “everybody does it”. That is to say, just about everyone HAS something on someone else. Call it blackmail if you wish…or leverage….in the way of ….if not information, then by means of accusation — brought to the heights of practice by the Republicans with Lee Atwater, Karl Rove, Swift-boating, various forms of smear campaigns. As everyone is fond of saying, “it may not be ethical, but hey, it works.” Honor among thieves.
    Everyone’s afraid their whole career will be jeopardized and/or they won’t be re-elected if they run into the buzz-saw of some of these villians. And, now, good grief, consider all the wire-tapping! Now they KNOW someone has the goods on them. Whether they do…or not.
    One of the best examples, to me, is Nancy Pelosi giving a speech at the AIPAC luncheon and being booed off the stage. She promptly went back to her office and found a means to curry favor back with them….by dropping the bill that would require Bush to get Congress’ approval before bombing Iran. Of course, that …having a billed passed with that language…. wouldn’t have stopped Bush/Cheney anyway….they’d just write another (what 2,000th by now?) “signing statement” saying ….Ha Ha, remember the (so-called) “Patriot” Act…I am KING. We’re at WAR! (that’s why I started it)…and I can bomb any damn body I wish….so neh neh neh neh neh neh….
    The point is….the slippery slope. Once the so-called Commander in Chief and so-called (unelected) President begins dissing the Constitution AND the “rule of law”…..well, then, it became a free-for-all. Look, everyone does it these days, take care of YOURself….don’t worry about it!
    So they do. Just take care of THEMSELVES and their careers.
    I truly cannot imagine anyone who has done more harm to this country and the de-valuation of our Constitution in so short a time than George W. Bush and Richard Cheney.
    IMPEACH!!!

    Reply

  10. Memekiller says:

    If Cheney is taking all this to protect Cheney, I don’t feel sorry for him. Where’s the nobility in sacrificing for Cheney?

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  11. pauline says:

    David N wrote:
    “reason that people who commit white-collar crimes that damage the likes of thousands of people — like the management of Enron — get off scott free, while people who acted out of despiration, and didn’t hurt anyone, get major jail time.”
    “They say that patriotism is the last refuge
    To which a scoundrel clings.
    Steal a little and they throw you in jail,
    Steal a lot and they make you king.”
    btw, the correct spelling is “scot-free “.

    Reply

  12. David N says:

    Thus, the letters from other criminals on Libby’s behalf that everyone is talking about on the newscasts are not just hypocritical; they are irrelevant.
    Judges should not be asked to “look into the soul” of the defendents they sentence. It’s a silly idea for a president, and it’s a fantasy in a court of law. People should be judged based on what they did, period.
    That would, like many other good ideas, be a profound and fundamental change in the way things are. It should still be something that reasonable people debate and work to institute.
    And that’s another impossible idea off my chest. Thanks for reading this far. Now what?

    Reply

  13. David N says:

    I’m going to try to bring up a completely new subject, and see if anyone reads this old thread, and has any interest in responding.
    One subject that the Libby pleas has reminded me of is the way that the entire legal system in the United States is broken, and nobody has any interest in discussing it. This is because the system is broken in a way that benefits the rich, powerful, and well-connected, such as Scooter.
    What I’m talking about is the idea that a court of law should — or can — judge someone based on who that person is, rather than what that person has done. Thus, a white, male, Ivy-league alum such as Libby should get off lightly for contributing to the deaths of thousands, while a young, male person of color from the inner city should be jailed for life for something like enjoying a joint in privacy.
    The assumption is that our legal system has any business judging the totality of a person’s life and work, rather than simply making a finding of fact — that the person broke the law — and setting the punishment according to that fact.
    This is the reason that the jails are disproportionately filled with minorities. This is the reason that people who commit white-collar crimes that damage the likes of thousands of people — like the management of Enron — get off scott free, while people who acted out of despiration, and didn’t hurt anyone, get major jail time.
    In his book, “The Mismeasure of Man,” Steven J. Gould talked about how in the nineteenth century courts would base their sentences on the physiognomy — or the phrenology! — of defendents. Today, they do the same thing, only it’s based on the cost of the defendent’s suits more than anything else!!

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  14. PissedOffAmerican says:

    In my humble opinion, Steve might benefit from some reflection about how in touch he is with mainstream americans, who are not Washington insiders, and are not being tittilated on a daily basis by rubbing elbows with those in power. The seductive influence that keeping such company manifests must be powerful indeed, and I really believe I have seen Steve’s comments increasingly telegraph his movement away from an empathetic understanding of mainstream american life. His comment about feeling sorry for Scooter is but one more small indicator of the insidious influence that power can can inflict upon any of us.
    There are many middle Americans, and Americans from our poverty sectors, that are languishing in prison, in the general population of prison, whose crimes are of far less import than the crime that Scooter committed. I doubt Scooter will ever see a day behind bars. And I doubt Valerie Plame and her husband will ever see justice done.
    Our President has expressed sympathy for the criminal, and animous towards the victims. There is the true story here. There is the true gauge of this Presidency, this administration, and the current nature of Washington politics.
    Steve, once this shit gets above your waders, you might as well run for office, because I doubt you’ll even recognize you’re swimming in the sewer with the rest of these bastards. And it appears you’re at least knee deep.

    Reply

  15. PissedOffAmerican says:

    http://whatreallyhappened.com/
    Who won the debate?
    Posted Jun 5, 2007 08:19 PM PST
    Category: POLITICS/CORRUPTION
    When I linked this page earlier in the evening, it went to a list of comments about the GOP debate tonight (Tuesday night). The comments were overwhelmingly in favor of Ron Paul. It thus comes as no surprise that CNN has removed the comments about Ron Paul and re-directed the link to comments about Monday Night’s debates.
    Shame on CNN for trying yet again to “pre-screen” the candidates before the elections.
    A copy of the comments about Ron Paul, presented in its entirety as they were before CNN pulled them, can be found HERE
    http://www.whatreallyhappened.com/missingcomments.php
    It is time for the American voters to send a clear message that the mainstream media will NOT choose the President of the United States. That choice belongs to WE THE PEOPLE.
    Shame on CNN for such underhanded chicanery!

    Reply

  16. Bill R. says:

    If a government official is going to be a “good” nazi soldier he has to pay the penalty. He helped sell the war of deception that has led to the deaths of hundreds of thousands. He betrayed his country by participating in a conspiracy to disclose an agent and a security network. How many agents in that network were exposed? How many may have died or been arrested? How many potential foreign agents have now been dissuaded because of Libby and Cheney and others to work with U.S. intelligence? Your sympathy is misplaced. The sentence wasn’t nearly enough, and he is protecting the one who should be in prison, Cheney.

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  17. J. says:

    Steve – not one to pile on, but holey crap, get a grip! In ten years, Libby will have written a book, earned millions in speaking fees, and have a very nice job in a think tank or on some board of directors. This is just a temporary set-back. The bastards take care of their own

    Reply

  18. Den Valdron says:

    Screw libby, he’s no better than any other common criminal. In many ways, he’s more reprehensible than a crack dealer, a pimp, a liquor store holdup artist or any number of petty thugs.
    He had every opportunity in the world, and he chose to commit his crimes anyway. He knew what the law was, he had all the advantages. And still, he wiped his ass with the truth.
    In the end, hundreds of thousands of people have died in part because of the games that Libby and his people played.

    Reply

  19. ... says:

    MS. PERINO: What I can tell you is how the President reacted today, which is to say that he does feel terrible for them( libbys family), he thinks they’re going through a lot right now, they’ve been through a lot. But given the fact that the judge has set up a process for appeal and given the way that the President has handled this for the past year or so, he’s not going to intervene.
    Q Does he feel sympathy for Scooter Libby?
    MS. PERION: Yes, he says he feels terrible for them; he’s sorry for the way that — for all that they’re going through and he can — <<
    nothing like the president feeling sorry for someone who has been convicted of a crime, while those folks in gitmo sit waiting for a trial, clearly guilty until proven innocent by this same stooge running the usa.

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  20. steambomb says:

    You think Cheney should get 30 months and a fine? Uh thats a pretty light sentence for treason.

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  21. easy e says:

    ?I do feel somewhat badly for Libby in this??.
    Huh???!???!!!
    More than 4 Million Iraqi?s Displaced
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19055852/
    not to mention the hundreds of thousands of lives that have been lost!
    And how about the ordeals of Plame/Wilson and the U.S. intelligence networks that were compromised?
    But, you somehow feel ?somewhat badly for Libby in this? for his protection of Cheney, ?who many think should be paying the fine and doing the time??!?! Does this mean henchmen should bear no responsibility?
    Steve, you?ve stated previously your agreement with Pelosi that impeachment should be off the table. We?re all interested in finding out how you really feel about the Libby indictment, verdict and sentence.
    P.S. James Carville certainly has revealed his true colors.

    Reply

  22. clio says:

    Libby deserves worse than he is getting.
    -Carroll
    Indeed.
    He willing chose to perjure himself not just once, but repeatedly.
    He successfully deflected an inquiry into treason at the highest levels of government.
    His jail sentence is too short and his fine far too small.
    He should spend the rest of his life in shame and penury.
    While I feel slightly sorry that Libby’s family must share his punishment I do not see that I must care more for his family than he does himself. He obviously was not thinking of or caring for his family when he repeatedly chose to betray his country for gain.

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  23. Red Planet says:

    Well of course you have to feel sorry for the Scoot. After all, he’s not the one who gave the order to off the Wilsons. He’s just the one who pulled the trigger.
    If he’d only grown up on a different side of the tracks, if only his family hadn’t had the money to send him to law school, he could be flipping hamburgers now instead of sweating it to see if GW will pardon him before or after he spends a day in prison.
    But there is light at the end of this long tunnel. After all, Elliot Abrams sets a shining example of how one’s fortunes can turn, from manipulative, powerful government insider, to convicted lawbreaker, to manipulative, powerful government insider again in the blink of an eye.
    So don’t feel too sorry for Scooter. Chances are, he will be back.

    Reply

  24. bakho says:

    Please. Libby will be handsomely rewarded for his silence and loyalty to power. Other notorious lawbreakers like Liddy and Ollie North were rewarded. Libby will be no different. The Mafia perfected the technique.

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  25. TonyForesta says:

    Do you feel bad for Sibel Edmonds, or Indira Singh? They are real patriots who have been silenced for daring to speak the truth. Why on earth would anyone show anything but contempt for Libby. He has as much blood on his hands, (and I mean blood, slaughtered lives, maimed lives, tortured lives, lives lost for illegal and illicit reasons in black prisons the world over, innocent lives snuffed out and blood shed as a direct result of Libby’s deceit, and perversion betrayal, and contempt for the rule of law, the laws of the land and the Constitution.
    Libby is receiving much less than he deserves, and we all know he will be pardonned in the end.
    Cheney is a fascist, a war criminal, a warmonger, a war profiteer, and a pathological liar with even more innocent blood on his claws whose just end will involve far worse a prison sentence.

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  26. della Rovere says:

    Yes Cheney deserves prison time. Butwhy the sympathy for an active willing deceitful henchman. He deseves a much longer sentence.

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  27. Dave says:

    Mr. Libby put his loyalty to the Vice President above his loyalty to the country. I hope he’ll reflect on that over the two years (hopefully) he’ll spend in prison.
    If he turned around and told the truth tomorrow, then I’d be happy to let him walk.

    Reply

  28. Kathleen says:

    One of the loving letters to the Judge in favor of Libby was co-signed by Mary Maitlin and James Carville. Cozy.

    Reply

  29. Dennis says:

    Dick Cheney doesn’t have the ethical character to do the time.
    You don’t have to be a blind conservative not to see it, just an ignorant one to deny it.

    Reply

  30. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Scooter Libby will not spend a single day behind bars.

    Reply

  31. Homer says:

    Libby = traitorous asshole
    He and all those who support him deserve to be renditioned to Iraq and dropped off in Falluja where they can live out the rest of their sorry lives running from those wishing to exact a pound of flesh for what they have done to Iraq and the USA.
    Good Riddance Traitor!
    Good Riddance War Profiteers!

    Reply

  32. Mrs. K8 says:

    Irving “Scooter” Libby (despite his nickname) is an ADULT. He is the one who chooses whether or not he will be a fall guy.
    At any time, Libby could have told the truth. He chose not to. Why not reserve tears and sympathy for people who are the genuine victims of this administration, rather than mafiosi who do time for the sake of their dons? After all, Cheney was protected so as to make sure the illicit war could go on undisturbed.

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  33. virginia cynic says:

    $5 million and all Scooter got in the end was a whining plea for mercy. Scooter is not a stand up guy since instead of taking the hit for the team he rounded up everyone he knew
    to beg for him. how demeaning and unkind to your friends.
    if you want to have the power guys like you and think you are a tough guy instead of the apparently nice guy that Libby can be in person ( read the letters)then you pay the price and have the grace not to involve your friends.
    An analysis by someone who knew Libby from prep school was that Libby was a nice guy but even from those days always wanted the guys in charge to like him and he still does. Sad but the price for this hero worship of bullies has cost real lives in the real world. too many dead Iraqis and dead american soldiers to feel sorry for scooter.

    Reply

  34. Carroll says:

    Posted by vachon at June 5, 2007 04:57 PM
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Yea, being a stand up guy is highly valued in the mafia and other assorted gangs…I am sure Libby can find a place with one of them after he gets out.

    Reply

  35. Carroll says:

    I am so NOT happy …to know that we taxpayers had a part in funding at least a portion of the neo’s Forward for Defense of Democracies meeting in the Bahamas last week.
    Jim Lobe:
    Incidentally, FDD was awarded $800,343 by the State Department’s Middle East Partnership Initiative (MEPI) for fiscal 2005 for a project that “supports a new generation of activists in the Middle East through training, technical assistance and mentoring.” MEPI was overseen at the time by Liz Cheney, then deputy assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern Affairs.

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  36. liz says:

    At least Scooter can get into court. Jane and John Q Public do not always get the opportunity. I have been waiting to close a matter unsuccessfully for six years now with the government…. I don’t matter as much as Scooter. Ya’ll can say it out loud. But what does America mean to you?

    Reply

  37. ... says:

    a lot of folks wondering and asking a direct question to steve on why he feels sorry for libby.. i wonder if steve will give anyone an answer on it..

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  38. Carroll says:

    Posted by Sandy at June 5, 2007 02:59 PM
    >>>>>>>>>>>>
    I had seen Moskowitz referred to before…basically as being a “gangster” type.
    Didn’t know how close he was to the neo’s but am not surprised. The whole little neomafia cabal needs to be wiped out.
    “It bears emphasizing that his financial patron (Wurmser’s) during the years he worked at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) alongside Richard Perle and Michael Ledeen was casino king, Irving Moskowitz, a profile of whom can be found here. Suffice to say that Moskowitz has also provided funding – quite generously – for the most radical elements of the Jewish settler movement. For more information about Moskowitz, readers could check out http://www.stopmoskowitz.org. That the mainstream media – which turned against Cheney (and “Scooter” Libby, who hired Wurmser) quite a long time ago — have ignored both Wurmser and his ties to Moskowitz and his settler beneficiaries is one of the more difficult-to-explain features of press performance over the past five years.”

    Reply

  39. pauline says:

    Don’t want any judges throwing out this dirty liar’s case. As you say, Steve, obstruction of federal investigations is serious. So, yea, let’s go after his boss while we’re after the truth.
    Judges at Guantanamo Throw Out 2 Cases
    By ANDREW O. SELSKY – The Associated Press – June 5, 2007; 4:16 AM
    GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba — With one word _ “unlawful” _ the only two war-crimes trials against Guantanamo detainees fell apart in a single day, marking a stunning setback to Washington’s attempts to try dozens of detainees in military court.
    Two military judges dismissed charges Monday against a Guantanamo detainee accused of chauffeuring Osama bin Laden and another who allegedly killed a U.S. soldier in Afghanistan.
    Salim Ahmed Hamdan of Yemen and Omar Khadr, a Canadian who was 15 when he was arrested on an Afghan battlefield, were the only two of the roughly 380 prisoners at Guantanamo charged with crimes under a reconstituted military trial system.
    Monday’s rulings stand to complicate efforts by the United States to try other suspected al-Qaida and Taliban figures in military courts.
    Defense attorneys and legal experts blamed the rush by Congress and President Bush last year to restore the war-crimes trials after the U.S. Supreme Court threw out the previous system, declaring it unconstitutional. In a remarkable coincidence, it was Hamdan’s lawsuit that wound up in the Supreme Court.
    In both of Monday’s cases, the judges ruled that the new legislation says only “unlawful enemy combatants” can be tried by the military trials, known as commissions. But Khadr and Hamdan previously had been identified by military panels here only as enemy combatants, lacking the critical “unlawful” designation.
    “The fundamental problem is that the law was not carefully written,” said Madeline Morris, a Duke University law professor. “It was rushed through in a flurry of political pressure from the White House … and it is quite riddled with internal contradictions and anomalies.”
    Prosecuting attorneys in both cases indicated they would appeal the dismissals. But the court designated to hear the appeals _ known as the court of military commissions review _ doesn’t even exist yet, said Marine Col. Dwight Sullivan, chief of military defense attorneys at Guantanamo Bay.
    Army Maj. Beth Kubala, spokeswoman for the Office of Military Commissions that organizes the trials, said “the public should make no assumption about the future of military commissions.”
    She said they will continue to operate openly and fairly and added that dismissals of the charges “reflect that the military judges operate independently.”
    She declined to comment on how the Office of Military Commissions planned to respond to the setbacks, saying she didn’t want to speculate.
    Military prosecutors declined to appear before reporters after their cases collapsed.
    The distinction between classifications of enemy combatants is important because if they were “lawful,” they would be entitled to prisoner of war status under the Geneva Conventions.
    A Pentagon spokesman said the issue was little more than semantics.
    Navy Cmdr. Jeffrey Gordon said the entire Guantanamo system deals with people who act as “unlawful enemy combatants,” operating outside any internationally recognized military, without uniforms or other things that make them party to the Geneva Conventions.
    “It is our belief that the concept was implicit that all the Guantanamo detainees who were designated as ‘enemy combatants’ … were in fact unlawful,” Gordon said.
    But Morris said the Military Commissions Act defines a lawful enemy combatant, in addition to a uniformed fighter belonging to a regular force _ as “a member of a militia, volunteer corps or organized resistance movement belonging to a state party engaged in such hostilities and who meets four additional criteria.”
    The dismissals of the cases do not spell freedom for Khadr or Hamdan.
    “It is very difficult when practical conditions for him don’t change,” said Joseph McMillan, one of Hamdan’s attorneys.
    Still, Hamdan’s military attorney, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Charles Swift, said his client “is relieved” by Allred’s ruling.
    “He hopes he gets a fair trial and, like the rest of us, is patiently waiting for it,” Swift told reporters.
    Sullivan, the chief of military defense attorneys at Guantanamo Bay, said the dismissal of Khadr’s case could spell the end of the war-crimes trial system. He said none of the detainees held at this isolated military base in southeast Cuba has been found to be an “unlawful” enemy combatant.
    “It is not just a technicality; it’s the latest demonstration that this newest system just does not work,” Sullivan told journalists. “It is a system of justice that does not comport with American values.”
    Sullivan said reclassifying detainees as “unlawful” would require a time-consuming overhaul of the Combatant Status Review Tribunals that first classified them as enemy combatants. But Gregory McNeal, a law professor at Pennsylvania State University, said nothing prevents the Defense Department from reconvening the hearings for detainees headed to trial and declaring them to be “unlawful” combatants.
    Carl Tobias, a law professor at the University of Richmond, said a retrial is possible because Brownback dismissed Khadr’s case without prejudice. Hamdan’s case also was dismissed without prejudice.
    U.S. Rep. Jerrold Nadler, a New York Democrat, said he plans to hold hearings on the Military Commissions Act, which he said is “riddled with problems and created a process that operates outside the rule of law _ it has crippled our ability to deal with the real criminals still being held at Guantanamo.”
    The only other detainee charged under the new system, Australian David Hicks, pleaded guilty in March to providing material support to al-Qaida and is serving a nine-month sentence in Australia. Sullivan said the dismissal of the Khadr case raised questions about the legitimacy of Hicks’ conviction.
    But Hicks’ lawyer, David McLeod, said Tuesday that his client was unlikely to challenge his conviction now that he had the certainty of a release date.
    “I don’t think it’s helpful to go down that path at the moment for David,” McLeod told Australian Broadcasting Corp. radio. “He has chose a route and he proposes to continue down that route.”
    Hicks’ father Terry Hicks agreed with the lawyer, adding that his son could he ordered to serve the suspended six years and three months balance of his sentence if he appealed and lost.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/05/AR2007060500135.html

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  40. vachon says:

    I’ll probably lose my membership in the The Ancient Order of the Shrill, but I have a grudging admiration for stand-up guys and gals. It doesn’t mean I want Scooter to walk or be pardoned. But he does get brownie points in my book the same way Poindexter did.

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  41. Dan says:

    Steve,
    Why do you feel bad for Libby? He broke the law. He threw sand in the eyes of investigators so the real culprit (Cheney) could get away with breaking the law. Why do you feel bad for Libby?
    You should feel bad for his family, to have such a disgrace as a relative.

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  42. GoRonGo says:

    Given that “Scooter”s lies led to at least one war against innocents, with another war on the horizion, give him the death penalty. Nuremberg trials anyone? Make sure and hang-em high…

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  43. ... says:

    he showed no remorse, and neither have bush or cheney.. it is a character trait of a neo con i guess.. they all figure they have done nothing wrong and still do… steve do you really think so too??

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  44. Gregariousred says:

    Who is to say that Cheney won’t be paying Libby’s fine? It’s the least he could do for a man who was willing to ruin his life for him.
    I don’t feel bad for Libby at all. Not one bit. I’m sick of white collar criminals getting slaps on the wrist. Cheney and Bush should be impeached, then sent to Iraq for a belated tour of duty.

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  45. Carroll says:

    Libby deserves worse than he is getting.
    20 years and 20 million sounds more like it… enough to make an impression on other would be Libbys.

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  46. Nate says:

    I don’t feel too bad for Libby.
    Libby & company played the risk/criminal behavior game which I’m sure is as prevalent in the corridors of power as it is on the street.
    As a DA, he knew exactly what he was doing. He just got caught this time & he took the blame for other associates.
    I just wonder what other criminal/treasonous acts him & company have gotten away with. Then again, that’s politics/life….
    But at least something came to light – where there’s a little smoke, there must be some fire.

    Reply

  47. Sandy says:

    And, for those feeling badly for Libby, remember, I. Lewis Libby is the neo-con, devoted to Cheney, who hired the infamous David Wurmser.
    Remember — speaking of nepotism — his Israeli-born wife, Meyrav Wurmser, who heads Middle East studies at the neo-con Hudson Institute….
    she was the main author of a 1996 report (Perle, et al) called “A Clean Break: A New Strategy for Securing the Realm”…for Binyamin Netanyahu.
    Our government has been hi-jacked by Libby, Cheney, the Wurmsers and the other neo-cons. Nothing less than hi-jacked.
    Read this:
    http://www.ips.org/blog/jimlobe/?p=24#more-24
    “The Wurmser Squirms
    Helene Cooper’s article in the New York Times and the International Herald Tribune Saturday could mark a decisive moment in the fight between the hawks and the realists within the administration.
    That Cheney, via David Wurmser, has been shopping attack scenarios on Iran without Bush’s approval could very well bring things to a head. If Rice/Gates/Burns want to go after the Vice President’s office, this gives them a very big opening.
    See Steve Clemons’ blog, thewashingtonnote.com, to which Cooper alludes.
    Having served under John Bolton in the State Department and Douglas Feith in the Pentagon before moving to Cheney’s office in September 2003, Wurmser has been perhaps the most extreme of the “Likudist” neo-cons in the administration. I have written about him here and here. It was he who drafted the 1996 “Clean Break” paper as part of a committee chaired by Perle….” …………..snip

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  48. DonS says:

    “I do feel bad for Libby in this”
    What’s to feel bad about? Libby egregiously violated the law, and the trust of the
    American people, and gave the legal system the middle finger.
    Hey, I’ve got an idea. How about going after the other culprit? Cheney. Then Libby’s punishment should seem light by comparison.

    Reply

  49. ethan says:

    Let the fuck rot in jail.
    If only we could hear the lamentations of his woman and children.
    And no, I’m not kidding.
    See here –>
    http://icasualties.org/oif/
    for more details.

    Reply

  50. John B. says:

    crocodile tears I’m sure

    Reply

  51. corinne says:

    Why on earth would you feel bad for Scooter Libby? (Not that that is a unique sentiment here.)
    He didn’t have to take the heat for Cheney. He could have sung like a bird and helped himself. I don’t see Cheney leaping to Libby’s defense.
    Don’t feel bad for him at all. He knew exactly what he was doing.

    Reply

  52. Sandy says:

    I need to calm down, I guess. Breathe, as a friend told me once.
    But one thing I also want to know is this. The SMEAR Cheney, et al used against the Wilsons was primarily an accusation of nepotism….that Valerie used her influence to get the CIA to send her husband to Niger.
    Republicans have turned themselves INSIDE OUT trying to ignore the CIA and Valerie who say it was her boss who decided to send him..not herself… Her boss who asked her simply to write up what she knew of her husband’s past professional experience and expertise in being right for the job (which of course was considerable!). Because she did that…..as her boss asked….THAT was what the WHIG (White House Iraq Group) started screaming about. Turned to the press/MSM buddies/co-conspirators to disseminate for them. (Nice, eh?) Remember one reporter saying she had received at least SIX calls from them with this? No, of course you don’t. It’s always buried by the corporate-owned MSM.
    BACK TO MY QUESTION — do you all not find the charge of nepotism pinned on Valerie ludicrious to begin with? HYPOCRITICAL????
    Is it….or is it not….true that Bush’s WHOLE ADMINISTRATION is feathered with all his cronies, friends, and relatives? Good grief, someone tally them up! Every damn body competent or not from TEXAS works somewhere….highly paid….do they not? (“Poor” Fredo….)
    Is it…or is it not…TRUE…that DICK CHENEY’S DAUGHTER ELIZABETH CHENEY has a manufactured job for some phony operation that operates as a slush fund at the State Department’s Middle East bureau, aka the $56,000,000 federally taxpayer funded “The Foundation for the Future” (whose “future” one might ask)? A foundation, btw, that has made NO GRANTS, and held only two board meetings since its creation a couple of years ago. WHAT IS IT DOING? WHAT ARE THEY DOING THERE?
    Riza works at their Washington office at the Henry L. Stimson Center, right? She’s the ONLY one, correct? DOES SHE HAVE ACCESS TO CLASSIFIED INFORMATION? If so, WHY? Their other office is in Beirut, btw, right? WHY? Foundation for the FUTURE? Whose future? Israel’s? NEO-CONS? Have YOU been neo-conned today?
    That DAUGHTER ELIZABETH CHENEY hired…Shaha RIZA….Paul Wolfowitz’ MISTRESS/sexual partner?…..because Wolfie wasn’t allowed to keep her at the World Bank?
    Is it….or is it not….TRUE….that as a FOREIGN NATIONAL, Shaha RIZA is illegally holding these jobs? As a foreign national, she is not…..supposed to have….hold….a HIGH LEVEL SECURITY CLEARANCE….as required by all who work at the State Department, right? WHY is that?
    Do we….we the American people….need our very own “White House Iraq Group” (WHIG) counterpart to
    ….start….spreading…the…news?
    What OTHER instances of nepotism and/or cronyism do YOU know of on the part of the Bush/Cheney Regime?

    Reply

  53. Txs Reader says:

    I WOULD feel sorry for Libby if he was a young, fresh out of school kid. But as National Security Advisor to the VP, as soon as people in the VP office started the “lets spin it as a junket his wife sent him on” crap he should have contacted CIA, ascertained she was undercover, and told everyone in the VP office and the White House to keep their mouths shut. He’s a grown man who not only did not protect a CIA agent, he then lied to investigators.
    Finally, as a grown man who was as aware of the character issues of the VP and the other hangers’ on as I am, a lowly citizen outside the beltway. Lie down with dogs, get up with fleas.

    Reply

  54. Marcia says:

    “as he’s clearly taking much of the heat for this to protect Cheney,”
    Libby chose to take this heat, it would seem his devotion to Cheney is the overiding principle in his life so he has no one to blame but himself.
    Moreover, I doubt he was the wide-eyed boy helping to blow out the candles with Uncle Dick. He chose to remain silent, but the fine and the time are far from enough to cover the magnitude of Cheney’s unqualifiable deeds.

    Reply

  55. Felonius says:

    Steve:
    Don’t feel bad for Scooter. He is a wealthy and successful crook who wanted to continue destroying people’s careers and reputations and weakening the United States through the end of Cheneybush’s second term.
    As for his sentence, let’s hope it’s the first of many. If Shooter was worse than Scooter, his punishment should reflect that.

    Reply

  56. Sandy says:

    And, I wonder, who is it who is feeling badly for Valerie Plame Wilson, her husband Joe, and their family, friends, and colleagues? Were any of her colleagues around the world KILLED as a result of these stupid little stunts? How much did it cost this country in terms of gathering, having, important intelligence info on WMD?
    The CNN spin was immediately at work saying how surprisingly “harsh” the sentence is (Jeff Toobin, Heidi Collins). Harsh? For TREASON??? Covering up TREASON???
    Going after….”fair game” per Turdblossom Rove….a woman whose career was to protect this country by concentrating on …gathering information on…Weapons of Mass Destruction…TO PROTECT THIS COUNTRY AND ALL OF US?
    BUSH/CHENEY/RICE et al HAD to stop her — she knew too much. Her intelligence would confirm that neither Iraq …..nor IRAN….had…or were close to having WMD to actually threaten the U.S. or Israel.
    Why does no one ask questions about THE WHITE HOUSE IRAQ GROUP???? All those who made it their “MISSION” to discredit the Wilsons and out a covert CIA agent, trying to divert attention from the LIES that were the basis for their pre-emptive war on a sovereign country that never attacked us? Doesn’t Irving Libby (Scooter…how “cutesy”) have some BLOOD on his hands….right along with Bush, Cheney, Rice, Rumsfeld, Wolfowitz, Perle, FEITH, and the rest? The Wilsons have served this country with great distinction. They are true American patriots. Their lives have been turned upside down by a bunch of neo-con THUGS.
    Why is there no OUTRAGE ….”feeling”….follow-up….about THAT??? Who ever covers THEIR side of this story? (Yes, FDL)
    Thirty months and $250,000 is far TOO LITTLE penalty! Isn’t it true that the Bush administration had harsher Federal sentences thrown out? How convenient.
    I just hope W’s pardon will cost him. He already has ZERO credibility despite the laughable Victoria Toensing’s and Fred Hiatt’s, et al valiant efforts at disinformation and jury tampering.
    Some of us at least are MAD AS HELL and refuse to take this anymore!
    Stand up and be counted, people!

    Reply

  57. Sandy says:

    My hope is the appeals process is a short one…and unsuccessful.
    Maybe he’ll be in jail by the time the aspens turn….

    Reply

  58. oofda says:

    Steve,
    I don’t feel sorry at all for Libby. As an attorney, he was an officer of the court, and knew what he was doing. He lied and did so repeatedly, and in so doing, impeded a serious investigation. We may never know the real story due to his lying. He also received 2 years supervised probation after release.

    Reply

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