Ron Paul Working the Dems

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ron paul 2008.jpg
Here are two interesting emails I received this morning about Ron Paul’s efforts at soliciting the support of Democrats.
The first is from Iowa resident, Keith Porter, who is the “Guide to US Foreign Policy” on About.com. The second is from a regular poster in TWN comments, well known as “POA” (aka Pissed Off American).


From Keith Porter:

Steve,
Lounging here in my Muscatine, Iowa home, I just received an automated call from the Ron Paul campaign.
And this is interesting for four reasons: The phone list, the message, the robo-twist, and the
1. Because of my past participation in the Iowa Democratic Caucuses, I am flooded with automatic calls, mailings, and front door visits from all the Democratic campaigns. But until today, I had not received a single GOP contact. Is the Ron Paul campaign dialing at random? Or are they buying Democratic phone lists? Considering the message. . .maybe.
2. The call said, paraphrasing, “Democrats sent the new Congress to end the war in Iraq, but they have failed. And none of the leading Democratic candidates have a plan to immediately end the war. . .only Ron Paul has made a promise to end the war immediately.” Looks to me like the Paul campaign really is targetting Democrats.
3. The speaker on the call was clearly a recording, but after the first few lines he said, again paraphrasing, “If you want to speak to a Ron Paul volunteer, press one.” I have heard hundreds of robo-calls over the last several weeks (and last 20 years in Iowa), but never this twist. Seems the Paul campaign is spending some serious money in Iowa and is not afraid to try something new. (BTW, the caller ID for the message merely said “Philadelphia, PA.”)
4. What does it mean? The Iowa Caucuses (for both parties) are relatively open. Anyone can show up and register as a voter and party member at the caucus site. And any registered voter can switch party affiliation on site.
So Democrats fed up with the war could go to the GOP caucus and vote for Ron Paul. The Republicans even use a secret ballot (unlike the public declaration required at the Democratic caucus) so your neighbors would be left guessing about your intentions. The message was clearly aimed at people fed up with the war. And I know many Democrats who fit that bill. But I don’t know of any who are likely to be swayed toward the Ron Paul revolution.
Best, Keith

And then an email from commenter POA:

Steve,
I recieved the same kind of call from the Paul campaign about three or four weeks ago. And it was before I subscribed to his newsletters or had contacted his California campaign manager.
I too was perplexed as to how I was targeted for the call, particularly being in California. I punched in to speak to a rep to ask specifically, but was working at the time, and was unable to hold long enough to be connected to someone. It impressed me, however, because I have NEVER before in my life been targeted, or randomly selected, for such a call, and I marveled at this relatively unknown candidate’s apparent reach.
Unfortunately, and of course, I don’t think Kucinich or Ron Paul fit the bill, but this country is crying out for charismatic leadership, and a candidate possessing JFK’s charisma would take the presidency by a landslide.
NONE of the candidates possess the kind of charisma one would expect from presidential candidates. It is not only troubling from the standpoint of a voter that is woefully unimpressed, but it is troubling that the world community is undoubtedly equally unimpressed.
A sad state of affairs.
Best, POA

Ron Paul’s efforts to woo anti-war Republicans and Democrats have been impressive, but this ad has perhaps thrown his efforts back a few yards.
— Steve Clemons

Comments

20 comments on “Ron Paul Working the Dems

  1. arthurdecco says:

    Maybe the other 260,000,000 Americans who aren’t Libertarians could temper the effects of a Paul Presidency, carsick? …Or have you capitulated to the Rethuglican myth that the President is Gawd?!?

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  2. carsick says:

    In high school, I had a government teacher who once said, “I’m 90% with the Libertarians. It’s just that that other 10% scares the Hell out of me.”
    All these decades later I still remember that quote and agree with it.

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  3. hayduke says:

    He is an interesting candidate in many respects to me, a left of center Dem. But his lack of support for a woman’s right to choose, and his recent comments in regard to intelligent design, scare me off. His answer for Iraq I totally concur with in spirit, but I wonder about the practical reality of leaving tomorrow at 5:00. His lack of flexibility here is somewhat strident. I hope that Clinton or Obama or Edwards would not use the campaign to make such statements as they tend to come back and bite one. Sure makes it tough to vote when that is the case.

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  4. Kathleen says:

    Ungood German,,, right on…. the Gipper was a blowhard with shine-ola.

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  5. Ungood German says:

    POA says: “Well, I have yet to see a “blowhard” emanate anything resembling charisma. ”
    Ungood German says “Ronald Reagan. Game, set, match.”

    Reply

  6. Carroll says:

    Here’s an idea, let’s just go ahead an institute the “flat fair tax” or “sales tax” plan while we are having our little housing crash. That would knock out a lot of building for first time home buyers. This would certainly help reduce the market for homes among the young and also reduce retail consumer purchases related to home ownership. I don’t know how it would affect the rental market since renters would be paying a flat tax on their rental cost, I guess they are considering those who rent to be buying a “Service” provided by the landlord or “buying” a “rental contract”. But since buying “securities” is exempt under the flat tax plan I am missing the logic here. Does that mean there is also no tax on the “services” of WS? And that you don’t pay the tax when you buy those securities or stock or collect the tax on them when you resell them? So actually they aren’t flat taxing “everything” are they? Wonder why? LOL.
    http://www.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa-272.html
    Homes
    The NST should be applied to housing as it is to any consumer item. The general used property credit rules described above apply to primary residences.
    However, in the case of a primary residence, special rules may be established that allow the purchaser of a primary residence to elect to pay the tax over 30 years with interest. In the event this choice is made, the responsibility for remitting the tax rests with the buyer. If the primary residence is subsequently sold, then the entire tax is due (but any used property credit due would be allowed as well).
    Let us take the example of a couple buying their first home. Assume they purchase the home for $100,000 plus sales tax of $17,647 for a total price of $117,647. They may borrow from their bank to pay this amount or they may elect to pay the tax over 30 years. The tax would then be $588.24 per year or $49 per month. Under H.R. 3039, interest would be charged on the tax balance unpaid. Interest charges on this tax would be a little over $100 per month, declining to about $50 per month in the 15th year. The couple would be billed this amount by the tax-collecting authority. [53]
    An existing homeowner would be entitled to a credit against his next house on any sales tax actually paid.
    In addition, existing homeowners would receive a credit equal to the sales tax rate times equity payments (both downpayments plus mortgage principal payments) made under the income tax. A homeowner who purchased a house for $100,000 before enactment of the sales tax, made a $15,000 downpayment, and has made $10,000 in principal payments before enactment of the sales tax would, when he sold the home, be entitled to a credit of $3,750 ($25,000 times 15 percent) toward any tax due on the purchase of his next home. If he did not purchase a subsequent home, he would be refunded the $3,750.
    Homeowners are, in effect, paying a tax on their equity or principal payments toward a house at a 15 percent rate. Homeowners today must make their principal payments from after-income-tax dollars at rates typically in excess of 15 percent. Thus, under a sales tax most homeowners will fare better. Moreover, interest rates should drop considerably and most homeowners will be able to refinance their mort-gages at lower interest rates. The monthly housing payments for most homeowners, even new homeowners, will decline.
    Let us examine the case of a homeowner who sells a home and purchases a more expensive home. Assume he sold a home for $117,647 (of which $17,647 is tax).
    The seller would then be entitled to a credit of $17,647.
    If he then purchased another home for $176,471 (of which $26,471 would be tax), he would owe a net tax of $8,824 (the $26,471 of tax less the $17,647 credit from the sale of the previous home).
    Moreover, under the special rule for primary residences, the $8,824 could, at the taxpayer’s election, be paid over 30 years (i.e., $294 per year or $25 per month plus interest). If, however, he had purchased a less expensive home and saved the difference, he would be entitled to a net refund. Of course, if he later took the savings and then spent it on, say, a new car, he would pay tax at that time on the car.
    And this really works…your hair dresser, maid, lawyer, doctor, landlord, yardman, cakebaker, car repairer, taxi driver, wedding planner, painter, carpet shampooer, girl scout cookie seller, car washer, vet, cat clipper, dog walker, horse shoer, handyman, alteration lady, plumber, home remodelers, your Vegas gambling tables, ad nausum would have to collect the tax on their “services” and pass it on to the gov. And I guess old folks on lesser incomes who use a lot of drugs could just put the extra tax on their credit card or do without till they get their “rebate”.
    Calculating the Tax Base
    Perhaps the most difficult issue with respect to the national sales tax is deciding what tax rate to impose. To establish the proper rate, we need to first define the proper tax base. What is to be taxed? An ideal NST should have a wide tax base with few, if any, exemptions. Exempting certain goods and services–such as food and medicine–is problematic for two reasons: First, the more exemptions that are carved out, the higher the rate will be on everything else. Second, exemptions inject distortions into the tax system and eliminate the neutral tax treatment of goods and industries.
    Thus, the NST should be imposed on gross payments for the use, consumption, or enjoyment in the United States of any taxable property or service. Taxable property and services include any tangible property (including rents and leaseholds on tangible property) and services.
    Securities, contract rights, copyrights, patents, and the like are not taxable.
    Housing, financial intermediation services, government goods and services that are sold to the public–such as bus rides, postage stamps, and publications of the Government Printing Office–gaming services, and the unrelated business activities of not-for-profit organizations are also included in the tax base.
    Property (or services) produced or rendered outside of the United States (imports) would be taxed at the point of sale. Thus, virtually any consumer good (ranging from food to video games to cars) would be taxed. Apartment and house rents and home purchases also would be subject to tax. Goods purchased abroad by consumers would be taxed upon entry into the United States. [28] Services to individuals and households (including, for example, services provided by barbers, plumbers, therapists, accountants, lawyers, doctors, and the like) would also be taxed.

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  7. bob says:

    ?Naturally the common people don’t want war; neither in Russia, nor in England, nor in America, nor in Germany. That is understood. But after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is to tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country.? Hermann Goering

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  8. bob says:

    ?Naturally the common people don’t want war; neither in Russia, nor in England, nor in America, nor in Germany. That is understood. But after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is to tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country.? Hermann Goering

    Reply

  9. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Ron Paul Is Right About Pakistan
    by David T. Beito and Scott Horton
    The conventional wisdom among presidential candidates is that the assassination of former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto has proved the importance of continued American meddling in that land. Both Republicans and Democrats are rushing to mumble incoherent platitudes before the cameras, while several have even proclaimed their next big idea for how Pakistan ought to be run.
    Democratic candidate Bill Richardson made his first headline in months by proclaiming that President Bush ought to give former general – now just “president” – Pervez Musharraf his pink slip. Most of the rest simply say we should “support democracy” there.
    This “wisdom” of interference is so conventional that CNN’s Wolf Blitzer expressed shock when Republican candidate Rep. Ron Paul of Texas said that the tragedy proved his case for nonintervention in the affairs of other nations. We should not, Paul said, either subsidize or work to undermine other governments because such policies invariably only empower our enemies.
    continues at……
    tp://www.antiwar.com/orig/beitohor.php?articleid=12139

    Reply

  10. Carroll says:

    Posted by Joe at December 31, 2007 07:55 AM
    >>>>>>>>>>
    Well you should post those details here.
    And maybe he should quit referring to his plan as the “flat tax” so those of us who know what the “flat tax’ plan actually is won’t think his is the same.

    Reply

  11. Joe says:

    Carroll,
    Ron Paul is most definitely not pushing a flat tax. Instead, he is pushing for NO individual federal income tax, supported by a massive change in our foreign policy. And he does go into detail about his positions, he’s even written a book about it, “A Foreign Policy of Freedom”.

    Reply

  12. Robert Morrow says:

    POA,
    Maybe the reason you don’t see those Ron Paul signs and bumper stickers out where you live is because YOU have not been putting them up or passing out bumper stickers. Just a suggestion. Why don’t you get involved with your local Ron Paul Meet-Up group. They will put you to good use.
    “WHO ARE THESE KOOKS?”
    Chuck Baldwin
    December 19, 2007
    According to the Associated Press, “Republican presidential hopeful Ron Paul’s supporters raised over $6 million Sunday to boost the 10-term congressman’s campaign for the White House.”
    The AP report also said, “The [Paul] campaign’s previous fundraiser brought in $4.2 million.”
    According to the Paul campaign website, “In a 24-hour period on December 16, the campaign raised $6.026 million dollars, surpassing the one-day record of $5.7 million held by John Kerry.
    “During the day, over 58,000 people contributed to Dr. Paul’s campaign, including 24,940 first-time donors. Over 118,000 Americans have donated to the campaign in the fourth quarter.
    “The $6 million one-day total means the campaign has raised over $18 million this quarter, far exceeding its goal of $12 million.”
    Now, if one listens to most of the political pundits in the major media, Ron Paul is some kind of “kook,” and his supporters are also a bunch of “kooks.” So, the question must be asked, Just who are these kooks that are supporting him, and why are they giving Ron Paul all this money?
    First, let’s take a look at this “kook” who is receiving all this money. Ron Paul was born the third son of Howard and Margaret Paul, and was brought up with a work ethic in which one worked six days a week and went to church on Sunday. His first job was at age 5 helping his uncle wash bottles. He worked all the way through his youth mowing lawns, delivering newspapers, working in a drug store, delivering furniture and laundry, etc.
    In high school, Ron was a track star, winning state as a junior in the 220-yard dash and running 2nd in the 440. His time in the 100-yard dash was 9.8. That’s pretty good. I was never able to break 10-flat in the 100. Although, I bet I could have beaten him in the 50-yard dash. He also wrestled in high school. Coincidentally, so did I. But here Ron leaves me: he was president of the student council and an honor student. I never accomplished that. I was just glad to get promoted to the next grade. Even as a senior statesman, Ron Paul keeps himself in terrific shape. Have you seen him lately? He still maintains a rigorous exercise regimen.
    Ron’s two brothers are both ministers, and he became a medical doctor. He graduated from Duke University School of Medicine. When the Cuban Missile Crisis arose, Ron became a flight surgeon in the U.S. Air Force. He also served in the Air National Guard.
    As an OB/GYN physician, Dr. Paul has delivered more than 4,000 babies, and he and his wife, Carol, have been married for more than 50 years. They have 5 children, 18 grandchildren and 1 great-grandchild. Ron Paul is currently in his 10th term as a congressman from Texas.
    As a congressman, Ron Paul has never taken a government-paid junket. He is not accepting a government pension. He returns a portion of his office budget every year to the taxpayers. As a member of Congress, he has never voted a raise for himself. Do you know any other member of Congress that can make such a claim? Of course you don’t, because Ron Paul is truly one-of-a-kind.
    Former President Ronald Reagan said this about Ron Paul, “Ron Paul is one of the outstanding leaders fighting for a stronger national defense. As a former Air Force officer, he knows well the needs of our armed forces, and he always puts them first. We need to keep him fighting for our country.”
    Perhaps this helps explain why many of the “kooks” supporting Ron Paul are active-duty military personnel. In fact, Ron Paul has received more campaign contributions from active-duty military personnel than any other Presidential candidate from either party.
    But who are the other “kooks” supporting Ron Paul? What kind of people give more than $18 million in a quarter-year to a Presidential candidate that is almost universally ignored by the mainstream press? What kind of people give record contributions to a Presidential candidate that is lampooned by his fellow Republican Presidential contenders?
    For example, Mike Huckabee recently said he could support any of the other Republican Presidential contenders (including Rudy Giuliani), except Ron Paul. That means, Mike Huckabee would rather support a pro-abortion, pro-gay marriage, pro-gun control liberal such as Giuliani than support the pro-life, pro-traditional marriage, pro-Second Amendment candidacy of Ron Paul. Why is that?
    Furthermore, why are the entire major media and establishment Republican machine either ignoring or lampooning a distinguished Air Force veteran, medical doctor, and ten-term Congressman? What is it about Ron Paul that the elite are so afraid of?
    Here is something else: while Ron Paul’s contributions have exploded, Mike Huckabee is all but broke! How can that be? How can a political “front-runner” be out of money, while a man who “doesn’t have a chance” is breaking fundraising records?
    So, who are these “kooks” who are sending Ron Paul so much money? And just why are they sending him so much money? I will tell you who they are, because I am one of them. They are rank-and-file, tax-paying citizens who are sick and tired of out-of-control federal spending and deficits. They have had it with an arrogant federal government that runs roughshod over both the Constitution and the liberties of the American people. They are people who have had enough of the IRS, the BATFE, and a thousand other federal agencies that have “erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our people, and eat out their substance.” (Declaration of Independence)
    They are people who see through the phony, disingenuous federal politicians who only want to fleece the American citizenry for the purpose of building their own personal fortunes. They have had it with the Military-Industrial complex that desires to build international empires at the expense of the blood and sacrifice of the American people. They have had it with David Rockefeller and his Council on Foreign Relations. They have had it with the arrogance of George W. Bush and Nancy Pelosi.
    They are sick and tired of paying outlandish taxes for a public education system that produces high school graduates who cannot read and write. They are sick and tired of working for 30 years to pay off a mortgage, only then to be forced to pay extortion money ( a.k.a. property taxes) for the rest of their lives to the feudal state. They are sick and tired of the government telling them what they can and cannot do with their own property. They are sick and tired of watching people with food stamps buy T-bone steaks and expensive Nike tennis shoes while they are forced to buy fatty hamburger and cheap sneakers.
    They are sick and tired of watching their manufacturing jobs go to China and India. They have had it with money-hungry businessmen who hire illegal Mexicans at slave labor wages. They have had it with labor unions promoting politicians who support NAFTA, CAFTA, and the FTAA. They are sick and tired of being bled dry at the gas pump.
    They have had it with this phony “war on terrorism” that sends trillions of dollars to nations throughout the Middle East, but refuses to close our own borders to illegal immigration. They have had it with the “war on drugs” and the “war on terror” being used as excuses to trample people’s freedoms. They have it with Vicente Fox and Felipe Calderon. They have had it with Bush’s North American Union. They have had it with Joel Osteen and Rick Warren. In short, they have just had it!
    They also know that a vote for any other Presidential candidate is a vote for more of the same. Democrat or Republican: it is more of the same. Ron Paul, and Ron Paul alone, will bring a revolution of freedom and independence to America. Believe me, the Ron Paul revolution is bigger than Ron Paul. This is the beginning of a movement.
    No matter what ultimately happens to Ron Paul’s candidacy, the fight to return America to its roots of freedom and independence has started. The fire is lit. There is no putting it out. There will be other Ron Pauls, other campaigns, other spokesmen, other fundraising. The people supporting Ron Paul will not be silenced; they will not be ignored; they will not be intimidated. In truth, Ron Paul’s campaign may just be the beginning of the end of the elitist, globalist, stranglehold over America.
    As one who is also fed up with the globalist goons that dominate the two major parties, I join the Ron Paul revolution and vow to fight for the rest of my life for the freedom and independence of these United States. This means I will never again support a business-as-usual, millionaires-club, globalist toady from either party ever again! I will only support candidates who are fully committed to restoring constitutional government. If that makes me a kook, so be it.
    Chuck Baldwin is Founder-Pastor of Crossroads Baptist Church in Pensacola, Florida. In 1985, the church was recognized by President Ronald Reagan for its unusual growth and influence.

    Reply

  13. Carroll says:

    I don’t know that I agree with Keith:
    ” The message was clearly aimed at people fed up with the war. And I know many Democrats who fit that bill. But I don’t know of any who are likely to be swayed toward the Ron Paul revolution.”
    I know Paul is popular with Southern democrats in my area, as well as “normal” repubs.
    For some reason people assume all dems are nanny staters, and socialist whiners and pacifist. That isn’t the case.
    If Paul ran as an independent I think he would steal a lot of votes from both parties…just because Everyone I know is so fed up with the usual crap that passes for representives of the people they are willing to chance cutting their nose off to spite their face just to get rid of the usual scumbags.
    But Paul also doesn’t go into details about his positions either…I was listening to him talk about the “flat tax” …and if the public really knew how the flat tax worked they would run for the hills. If Paul’s flat tax plan is the same that has been around for ages (and is over at the Cato site btw) he is nuts, if not he should explain how his is different. I saw a lot of young families at one of his gatherings and thought to myself if they knew the next house they bought would have a 27% flat tax added on to the purchase they would probably have a heart attack, even thought the plan calls for letting people “finance” tax cost like this one. Hummm…buy an average 400,000 house, finance the 108,000 flat tax on it with the mortage like a lot of average young people would have to do and enjoy paying a total of $233,000 to pay off your flat tax on your house. LOL…and the interest wouldn’t be deductable because the IRS would be no more and you never file income tax again. All those juicy deductions for IRA and college and 3.4 children and home mortages and investment property and so on,all gone. However those deducitons are’t gone for business and corps, just little people. Yep the masses will love never having to file taxes again. And the really brillant part is that although the IRS will be gone the gov will have to set up another entirely new agency to figure rebates according to income guidelines…so after you pay out the “flat tax” and the average person finances it as with a house or car you might get back some of the tax…but the interest?…and lost opportunity money cost of prepaying this flat tax…forget’bout it.
    Jesus….the things these think tanks think up.
    Anyway, as they say, the devil is in the details and none of these experienced, change agent, visionaries are giving out details.
    So we can assume when one finally does take the Exec office and roll their product out it will be as popular and useful to people as beach thongs for Eskimos.

    Reply

  14. susan says:

    http://www.thenation.com/doc/20071224/hayes
    Ron Paul’s Roots
    by CHRISTOPHER HAYES
    [from the December 24, 2007 issue]
    Although not a single vote has been cast, it’s safe to say that Ron Paul has run the most successful libertarian presidential campaign in American history. Sure, the Libertarian Party nominates a candidate every term, but said candidate struggles to garner money and media attention. Paul, however, has become a legitimate phenomenon, if not a particularly likely GOP nominee. With his full-throated rejection of the imperial project in Iraq and a radical vision of a stripped-down state (though, oddly, one that still forces pregnancy), he’s attracting large crowds at campaign events and polling at a healthy 8 percent in New Hampshire. In November he broke the single-day fundraising record with a $4.2 million haul.
    So you would think that the circle of DC-based libertarians centered around the Cato Institute would be ecstatic. Not quite. “He doesn’t strike me as the kind of person that’s tapping into those elements of American public opinion that might lead towards a sustainable move in the libertarian direction,” says Cato vice president for research Brink Lindsey.
    Self-identified libertarians may be a tiny portion of the electorate, but small numbers have never stood in the way of bitter intramural sectarian disputes. When Lindsey says that Paul “comes from a different part of the libertarian universe than I do,” he’s referring to the libertarian version of the Trotsky/Lenin split, which opened up in the early 1980s and continues to echo through libertarianism today.
    In 1981 American libertarianism’s founding father, Murray Rothbard, had a falling out with Cato leaders over their weak-kneed conception of libertarianism as “low tax liberalism.” After being kicked off the board of the organization he had helped found, Rothbard, a Jewish, Bronx-born economist who’d studied with Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises, helped found the Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama. The institute became the intellectual center for what Rothbard protégé Lew Rockwell termed “paleolibertarianism,” a worldview rooted squarely in the populist Old Right tradition. Paleolibertarians tend to be culturally conservative (attracting, on the edges, a fair share of Confederacy nostalgists and white supremacists), zealously against imperial foreign policy and the Federal Reserve. “Ron Paul has shown that the core of the state is the Pentagon and the Federal Reserve,” says Rockwell, who was Paul’s Congressional chief of staff from 1978 to 1982.
    The division between paleolibertarians, centered around the Mises Institute, and cosmopolitan libertarians, centered around Cato, is also a case of “culture clash,” according to Justin Raimondo, editorial director of Antiwar.com and prominent member of the Mises set. “There’s the populist wing of the libertarian movement, and then there’s the Washington crowd that’s still trying to sell libertarianism, or their version of it, to elites. These people want to go along and get along. As long as they can abort their babies and sodomize each other and take as many drugs as they want to, they are happy. They don’t care who is being killed in Iraq and how many Iraqis are dying. That’s their hierarchy of values.”
    As you can tell, there’s no love lost between the two camps. One DC-based libertarian–who asked not to be named because he “would like to avoid getting endless 2 am calls from nuts yelling at me for not agreeing with the gold standard”–told me he thinks Rockwell is “one of the most loathsome people ever to set foot on this continent.”
    But nothing breeds harmony like success, and the Paul bandwagon is now getting big enough for both the Hatfields and the McCoys to get on board. “Our readership is very enthusiastic,” says Nick Gillespie, editor of the DC-based magazine Reason. A few months ago Reason published an article titled “Is He Good for the Libertarians?” That no longer seems an open question. “On basic fundamental issues he speaks strongly for libertarians, regardless of the flavoring,” says Gillespie, who recently co-wrote a pro-Paul op-ed in the Washington Post.
    This gets to the paradox at the heart of the Paul campaign: he’s the candidate least likely to hedge or obfuscate, the most apt to spell out in sharp detail his underlying principles–and yet he’s also something of an ideological cipher, attracting the support of everyone from hipstertarian kids on Northeast college campuses to John Birchers in Texas. “You have this weird group of people,” says Lindsey. “You’ve got libertarians, you’ve got antiwar types and you’ve got nationalists and xenophobes. I’m not sure that is leading anywhere. I think he’s a sui generis type of guy who’s cobbling together some irreconcilable constituencies, many of which are backward-looking rather than forward-looking.”
    But even if the Paul campaign doesn’t point the way toward some lasting, powerful, paleo-cosmo libertarian coalition (and, really, let’s hope it doesn’t), he is at least providing libertarians with a long-awaited Kumbaya moment. “There are personal animosities that will probably never heal,” says Raimondo. “But, you know, maybe Ron Paul can unite us all.”

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  15. DreadPirate says:

    Ron Paul is swooing DEMs for an eventual Independent run after he looses the primaries. But RP is less an “Independent”, than he is the personification of an “Isolationist”.
    And Paul’s policy views, if ever enacted as administration policy, would present the other extreme of American foreign policy lunacy. They’ll leap our country into a cesspool of trouble; and yet, just watch their protectionist instincts defend our country with Uzi’s ‘made in China’.
    But just in case these wackos come to power, …let’s call them “NeoIsols”; and I mean it phonetically. ;/

    Reply

  16. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “Charisma as the deciding factor?”
    Whether you like it or not, it is charisma that provides the foundation for popular support.
    Kucinich is a good example of what happens to sound ideas that are advanced by uncharismatic personalities.
    Obama would be a good example of how far a little bit of charisma can go to advance an inexperienced and unqualified media sensation.

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  17. gorak says:

    Charisma as the deciding factor?
    Wow, people are dying over this election, I’m shocked there are people out their who wouldn’t mind the blood on their hands as long as they have a charismatic public speaker to watch on TV.

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  18. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Now this is intriguing. What exactly is Obama admitting to here? That he recognizes Ron Paul as a contender? That he recognizes Ron Paul is purposely being excluded from media attention and polling?
    Obama contrasts himself with Romney
    From NBC/NJ’s Aswini Anburajan
    KNOXVILLE, IA — Obama loves his Republicans. He makes an open pitch for GOP voters in his stump speeches, even as he calls them out in his stump speeches, saying he can beat Mitt and Rudy and Huckabee. At a town hall in Knoxville today, he threw in Ron Paul. “They don’t poll Ron Paul, but I can beat him too.”
    continues at…..
    http://firstread.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2007/12/30/539516.aspx

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  19. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “Personally, i can do without charismatic blowhards.”
    Really? Well, I have yet to see a “blowhard” emanate anything resembling charisma. But at any rate, you’re right about the blowhard part, we have plenty of them lined up to slime their way into the Oval Office.
    After emailing Steve, I was pondering the phone call I got from the Paul campaign, and recalled that my option to speak to a rep was presented by the recorded recitation of an 800 number, rather than a keypad option. After calling the number, I was unable to expend the time to wait to be taken off of hold. I spent about four or five minutes holding before I hung up.I wonder if the wait time was due to call volume, or inadequate staffing? Honestly, I wish I would have hung in there to see what the “rep” had to say.
    It will be interesting to see how Paul’s California campaign manager handles this state, given its “liberal” leanings. I live in a remarkably conservative part of California, Kern County, and a week of wearing a Ron Paul cap has only illicited a single response, which was a query from a friend of mine about “Who is this guy Ron Paul?”. However, he works in L.A. County, in the San Fernando Valley, Malibu, Santa Monica, Ventura, etc, and he says he sees Ron Paul yard signs and bumper stickers all over the place. I have seen NONE in the Tehachapi/Bakersfield/Central Valley area, a highly Conservative region. Kinda makes one wonder.

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  20. free ks says:

    Steve – sharing these first person accounts are most enlightening. Personally, i can do without charismatic blowhards. They’re hiding something. Congressman Ron Paul has for 30 yrs been standing on the same Jeffersonian bedrock our country was founded on. No fluff, just ideas. Enthusiastic Paulites are pumped about his ideas, not the man per se. He is hated by the welfare=warfare state, FOX mews and corrupt bag men and that in and of itself piques legions of new voters.

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