Private Note to Bush from Hagel Calls For Direct, Unconditional, Comprehensive Talks with Iran

-

hagel clemons salon dinner 10.30.07.JPG
I have just secured a private letter — not yet publicly released — from Senator Chuck Hagel to President Bush and copied to Condoleezza Rice, Robert Gates, and Stephen Hadley. I should add that I did not receive this letter from Senator Hagel but from other sources.
The letter urges the President to pursue “direct, unconditional, and comprehensive talks with the Government of Iran.”
In the letter, both attached (Hagel letter pdf) and reprinted in full below, Hagel warns that “unless there is a strategic shift [from the current situation], I believe we will find ourselves in a dangerous and increasingly isolated position in the coming months.” Hagel continues, “I do not see how the collective actions that we are now taking will produce the results that we seek.”
Senator Hagel encourages President Bush to take the bold strategic step of offering a completely different course for US-Iran relations. He writes about direct unconditional talks:

An approach such as this would strengthen our ability across the board to deal with Iran. Our friends and allies would be more confident to stand with us if we seek to increase pressure, including tougher sanctions on Iran. It could create a historic new dynamic in US-Iran relations, in part forcing the Iranians to react to the possibility of better relations with the West. We should be prepared that any dialogue process with Iran will take time, and we should continue all efforts, as you have, to engage Iran from a position of strength.
We should not wait to consider the option of bilateral talks until all other diplomatic options are exhausted. At that point, it could well be too late.

This letter is a call for serious, level-headed rationality from one of the Senate’s most stalwart “classic conservatives.”
I have since learned that the letter somehow made its way to US Central Command Commander William Fallon, perhaps through Defense Secretary Gates or other avenues, and Fallon allegedly communicated with the Senator that serious articulations of American interests and consideration of the options Hagel recommends are much needed in this current political and policy environment.
I need to also report that while I am in complete agreement with the content of Senator Hagel’s letter and had the privilege of moderating a dinner discussion with him yesterday evening, the content of this letter came via other sources to me — and I trust the Senator and his staff will respect the fact that I felt it important to bring this letter to public attention and have not violated any trust with any person in his office.
Full Text of Letter from Senator Chuck Hagel to President George W. Bush on US-Iran Policy, 17 October 2007:

October 17, 2007
The President
The White House
Washington, DC 20500
Dear Mr. President:
I write to urge you to consider pursuing direct, unconditional and comprehensive talks with the Government of Iran.
In the last two years, the United States has worked closely with the permanent members of the UN Security Council, Germany, Japan, and other key states as well as the UN Secretary General and the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency to pursue a diplomatic strategy regarding Iran’s nuclear program. I have supported your efforts. Maintaining a cohesive and united international front remains one of our most effective levers on Iran.
In the last year, you have also authorized our Ambassador in Iraq, Ryan Crocker, to hold bilateral talks with Iranian officials regarding the situation in Iraq. I have also supported this effort. Although Iran has continued dangerous actions in Iraq, this channel for dialogue is important.
I am increasingly concerned, however, that this diplomatic strategy is stalling. There are growing differences with our international partners. Concerns remain that the United States’ actual objectives is regime change in Iran, not a change in Iran’s behavior. Prospects for further action in the UN Security Council have grown dim, and we appear increasingly reliant on a single-track effort to expand financial pressure on Iran outside of the UN Security Council. Iran’s actions, both on its nuclear program and in Iraq, are unchanged. Iran’s leaders appear increasingly confident in their positions vis-a-vis the United States.
Unless there is a strategic shift, I believe we will find ourselves in a dangerous and increasingly isolated position in the coming months. I do not see how the collective actions that we are now taking will produce the results that we seek. If this continues, our ability to sustain a united international front will weaken as countries grow uncertain over our motives and unwilling to risk open confrontation with Iran, and we are left with fewer and fewer policy options.
Now is the time for the United States to active consider when and how to offer direct, unconditional, and comprehensive talks with Iran. The offer should be made even as we continue to work with our allies on financial pressure, in the UN Security Council on a third sanctions resolution, and in the region to support those Middle East countries who share our concerns with Iran. The November report by IAEA Director General ElBaradei to the IAEA Board of Governors could provide an opportunity to advance the offer of bilateral talks.
An approach such as this would strengthen our ability across the board to deal with Iran. Our friends and allies would be more confident to stand with us if we seek to increase pressure, including tougher sanctions on Iran. It could create a historic new dynamic in US-Iran relations, in part forcing the Iranians to react to the possibility of better relations with the West. We should be prepared that any dialogue process with Iran will take time, and we should continue all efforts, as you have, to engage Iran from a position of strength.
We should not wait to consider the option of bilateral talks until all other diplomatic options are exhausted. At that point, it could well be too late.
I urge you to consider pursing direct, unconditional and comprehensive talks with the Government of Iran.
Thank you for considering my views.
Best wishes.
Sincerely,
Chuck H.
Chuck Hagel
United States Senator
cc: Condoleezza Rice
Robert M. Gates
Stephen J. Hadley

This is a letter benchmarking the views of one of the most grounded, foreign policy savvy, common sense thinkers about the eroding state of America’s military and national security portfolio. And he’s a Midwestern American Republican who served in the United States Military.
Senator Hagel will be speaking for the Center for Strategic and International Studies on Thursday, 8 November, at the Capital Hilton at 11 am on the subject of America’s Iran policy — and no doubt this letter that I have secured will be among the topics of discussion.
— Steve Clemons

Comments

85 comments on “Private Note to Bush from Hagel Calls For Direct, Unconditional, Comprehensive Talks with Iran

  1. jiandanai says:

    There are various types of strapless options for the top of a dress. The necklines can be straight across, such as a bandeau or tube top Trompeten Brautkleider, or can have curves such as those found in a sweetheart neckline. This type of neckline takes its name from the heart shape created by two soft curves rising along the bustline. Not all strapless ideales Trompetes Brautkleid are tight on top, but the bustline is generally fitted enough to keep the dress up.

    Reply

  2. iphone app development says:

    Nice post keeps on posting this type of interesting and informative articles.

    Reply

  3. Sesli Chat says:

    Oh, thank you for you good.

    Reply

  4. free movies - rapidshare downloads says:

    IT technology is really on its heightened popularity nowadays that almost all industries are using technology. However, technology like internet should have proper limitation so that kids won’t be exploited to unsuitable websites for their age. Parents would be interested in something like Kidzui.

    Reply

  5. Target Coupon Codes says:

    I think it through multi-million/billion dollar contracts paid for by high-interest loans from major banks to the US government, or by loans funneled through the World Bank and USAID via other nations, such as Iraq today, both the banks and these corporations feed on instability and war at every level – From building pipelines, to renting the pipelines; From serving whoppers to our soldiers, to rebuilding infrastructure destroyed by the bombs manufactured in every small town around this country.

    Reply

  6. fiesta online gold says:

    It is really what I want to find out, thanks.

    Reply

  7. latale online gold says:

    As a new player , you may need some game guides or information to enhance yourself.

    Reply

  8. rf online gold says:

    you can also borrow rf online gold from other players

    Reply

  9. rappelz rupees says:

    Have you heared about a game which you need use gold to play?

    Reply

  10. buy Darkfall Gold says:

    very good Post,thanks!

    Reply

  11. Oyun says:

    could care less what he has “said”. Saying ain’t doing

    Reply

  12. registry cleaners says:

    thanks for this awesome quote

    Reply

  13. Physical Condition says:

    Physical Condition

    Reply

  14. free mp3 ringtones says:

    ringtones,free ringtones,free mp3 ringtones,free ringtones nokia,free ringtones sony ericsson,free ringtones samsung

    Reply

  15. tower defense says:

    I could care less what he has “said”. Saying ain’t doing. His actions in regards to his investmemnt in ES&S, and his vote to continue to allow Gonzales unprecedented powers of “appointment” are all I need to know about Hagel. That, and the fact he has not advocated holding Bush accountable for illegal and impeachable offenses committed against our Constitution and our nation’s best interests.

    Reply

  16. zxzxzx says:

    شات الخليج
    شات الحب
    شات السعودية
    شات
    دردشه
    دردشة
    دردشة بنات
    دردشة السعودية
    دردشة عربية
    شات صوتي
    مكياج 2009
    أزياء سهرة 2009
    شات جده
    شات الاحساء
    شات الدمام
    شات الرياض
    دردشة صوتية
    دردشة الكويت
    دردشة الامارات
    دردشة عمان
    دردشة قطر
    دردشة البحرين
    دردشة العراق
    دردشة اليمن
    دردشة سعودية
    دردشة كتابية
    شات كتابي
    عروس 2009
    بنات
    ترافيان
    الرياض
    فيديو
    حواء
    الخليج
    افلام
    وزارة التربية والتعليم
    ماسنجر
    قصص
    ترجمة
    الود
    الشله
    video
    اليوتيوب
    راشد الماجد
    عكاظ
    بلياردو
    العربية
    توبيكات ملونه
    توبيكات 2009
    توبكات
    توبيكات 2009
    توبيكات للبنات
    توبيكات بنات
    توبيكات رمضان
    كورة
    الوطن
    قوقل
    جريدة الرياض
    اليوم
    اغاني
    سعودي
    شات سعودي
    سعودي
    خليجي
    عربي
    منتديات السعودية
    منتديات الكويت
    منتديات الامارات
    منتديات عمان
    منتديات قطر
    منتديات البحرين
    منتديات العراق
    منتديات اليمن
    منتدى بنات
    خدمات
    مسجات
    منتديات
    منتدى
    عالم حواء
    العاب بنات
    العاب فلاش
    العاب
    دليل
    موقع
    يوتيوب
    جوال
    الجامعات
    YouTube
    Business
    online
    Roro 44
    برامج
    حب
    قصات شعر 2009
    الحياة الزوجية
    ياسر القحطاني
    Mobile
    university
    Tourism
    Travel
    صور
    ستار اكاديمي 6
    online games
    Internet
    Directory
    Free Download
    Games

    Reply

  17. LXJ says:

    Britain’s wow goldDefense Ministry wow goldrefused to confirmwow power leveling the incidentworld of warcraft gold, it was againstwow gold the policy wow power levelingU-boat operationswow gold.However,a spokesmanwow gold for the fact that nuclearwow gold security was not breached.

    Reply

  18. taylormade r7 says:

    so cool ,like the everyone

    Reply

  19. cheap jordans says:

    let me bookmark your

    Reply

  20. wholesale jewelry says:

    Wholesale jewelry, supply vast kinds of styles handmade jewelry,mainly engage in wholesale handmade jewelry such as wholesale crystal ,wholesale pearl ,wholesale gemstone,wholesale costume jewelry,also wholesale fashion jewelry like wholesale swarovski crystal,wholesale beads,wholesale turquoise,wholesale coral,costume jewelry,shell jewelry and discount jewelry, jewelry wholesale, just on AYpearl jewelry store.Unlimited selection of jewelry at Great prices!

    Reply

  21. BENJIE says:

    [url=http://finduo.com/search]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/pqjvjj]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/YrYWV8]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/vzng38]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/g1WQd0]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/nDTu04]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/bjGNBj]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/usmPPY]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/3aLsXU]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/yhrLhY]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/R3naUh]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/jmAtgB]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/G973a2]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/0BJRM4]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/A2UdUM]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/DbgMPX]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/UsERM9]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/1yAAmv]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/N7XavE]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/phMd63]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/pDdRta]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/NvvSAs]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/81rGH2]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/U6Y63W]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://finduo.com]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/VQuUtv]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/8Xb2pS]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/vZuB52]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/sY69N0]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/dqsvhe]uo gold[/url]
    [url=http://cli.gs/r7SjBJ]uo gold[/url]

    Reply

  22. wow power leveling says:

    In World of Warcraft, every gamers are striving wow power leveling and make wow gold. However, not every gamers all OK been wow power leveling. Because they still much to do. Please visit our website http://www.toppowerlevel . net Let us for you saving time and money help you wow power leveling. We promised you buy our wow power leveling services, we will soon begin your orders and guarantee in wow power leveling in Account safety. in our here not only wow power leveling many services. example: AOC Power Leveling, Warhammer Online Power Leveling, MapleStory Mesos, EVE ISK, WOTLK power leveling, AOC Gold, LOTRO Gold. We need your support Thank!!!
    http://www.toppowerlevel.net/buy.php : wow gold
    LWB

    Reply

  23. wow power leveling says:

    In World of Warcraft, every gamers are striving wow power leveling and make wow gold. However, not every gamers all OK been wow power leveling. Because they still much to do. Please visit our website http://www.toppowerlevel . net Let us for you saving time and money help you wow power leveling. We promised you buy our wow power leveling services, we will soon begin your orders and guarantee in wow power leveling in Account safety. in our here not only wow power leveling many services. example: AOC Power Leveling, Warhammer Online Power Leveling, MapleStory Mesos, EVE ISK, WOTLK power leveling, AOC Gold, LOTRO Gold. We need your support Thank!!!
    http://www.toppowerlevel.net/buy.php : wow gold
    LWB

    Reply

  24. Someguy says:

    Ron Paul is right: We don’t need to continue to violate the soverignty of other nations. It’s a failed concept. Let’s reinstate the Constitution. However, you must believe in limited government and that we Americans have the native intelligence to invent uncompromised energy efficiency devices that will not only give us energy independence but can usher in an era of national and global prosperity never before seen.

    Reply

  25. Mahyad Tousi says:

    Someone here made an argument that oil doesn’t play a major factor because we get the vast majority of our oil is imported from Canada and Mexico; which is true.
    I think this raises two question? What is the significance of Oil in the Middle East and if we are not as a nation reliant on it why do we excerpt so much effort to control it?
    The answers to these questions point to an economic concept that has become gospel and central to understanding the conflicts that we have faced since the Great War culminating in the our current state of affairs. First let us examine the answers:
    First – Our government (and this includes many in capital hill) considers it’s primary function, not the interests of the American people, rather the protection of American corporate interests, including Oil, Military, auto, etc, who rely on controlling and monetizing natural resources of other countries. This is not a conspiracy, rather an economic policy.
    Second – instability plays a crucial role in maximizing profits for these massive industries who control multiple industries, such as Halliburton which one of it’s multiple subsidiaries is Kellogg’s, Brown and Root, and it’s interests include Big Pharma, food and beverage, engineering, private security contractors, among others.
    Be it through multi-million/billion dollar contracts paid for by high-interest loans from major banks to the US government, or by loans funneled through the World Bank and USAID via other nations, such as Iraq today, both the banks and these corporations feed on instability and war at every level – From building pipelines, to renting the pipelines; From serving whoppers to our soldiers, to rebuilding infrastructure destroyed by the bombs manufactured in every small town around this country.
    These two realities are rooted in the fundamental belief that ALL economic growth benefits humankind; and that the greater the profits/growth, the more widespread the benefits. This is the economic foundation to all of our policies and the source of all our misery. It’s also the missing context in our analysis.
    We are not a secular society, rather a state controlled by a nexus between a monopolized political system and economic dogmatism – a half baked capitalist bureaucracy geared towards creating and protecting monopolies, rather than protecting our rights, promoting equal opportunity, and paving the way for fair and unhindered competition.
    Mahyad Tousi

    Reply

  26. Mahyad Tousi says:

    Someone here made an argument that oil doesn’t play a major factor because we get the vast majority of our oil is imported from Canada and Mexico; which is true.
    I think this raises two question? What is the significance of Oil in the Middle East and if we are not as a nation reliant on it why do we excerpt so much effort to control it?
    The answers to these questions point to an economic concept that has become gospel and central to understanding the conflicts that we have faced since the Great War culminating in the our current state of affairs. First let us examine the answers:
    First – Our government (and this includes many in capital hill) considers it’s primary function, not the interests of the American people, rather the protection of American corporate interests, including Oil, Military, auto, etc, who rely on controlling and monetizing natural resources of other countries. This is not a conspiracy, rather an economic policy.
    Second – instability plays a crucial role in maximizing profits for these massive industries who control multiple industries, such as Halliburton which one of it’s multiple subsidiaries is Kellogg’s, Brown and Root, and it’s interests include Big Pharma, food and beverage, engineering, private security contractors, among others.
    Be it through multi-million/billion dollar contracts paid for by high-interest loans from major banks to the US government, or by loans funneled through the World Bank and USAID via other nations, such as Iraq today, both the banks and these corporations feed on instability and war at every level – From building pipelines, to renting the pipelines; From serving whoppers to our soldiers, to rebuilding infrastructure destroyed by the bombs manufactured in every small town around this country.
    These two realities are rooted in the fundamental belief that ALL economic growth benefits humankind; and that the greater the profits/growth, the more widespread the benefits. This is the economic foundation to all of our policies and the source of all our misery. It’s also the missing context in our analysis.
    We are not a secular society, rather a state controlled by a nexus between a monopolized political system and economic dogmatism – a half baked capitalist bureaucracy geared towards creating and protecting monopolies, rather than protecting our rights, promoting equal opportunity, and paving the way for fair and unhindered competition.
    Mahyad Tousi

    Reply

  27. VL says:

    That Hagel, what a kidder. He actually thinks Bush would READ and CONSIDER his letter? What a maroon.
    Either Hagel is stupid beyond belief, or he’s making a cynical ploy to establish his creds. This is his “I was against the war before I was for it” moment.

    Reply

  28. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “But I’m a realist. And that’s pretty much the strongest current driving my topics and comments on the blog — and Paul has to do much more than he has done to convince someone like me that his presidential ambitions are worth focusing on.”
    Yeah, ho hum, we wouldn’t wanna ignore all the things that Obama and Hillary have “done”, now would we?
    Such as…uh…well…lemme see now…uhm…
    About that “realist” bit, Steve……….

    Reply

  29. Steve Clemons says:

    POA — Ron Paul’s letter is fine. Glad he wrote it. But it doesn’t have the same weight as this letter in my view — and it did not trigger a response to my knowledge from William Fallon. Fallon’s comments on the Hagel letter indicate something about the internal debate.
    I appreciate your enthusiasm for Ron Paul, but I don’t believe that he’s someone I can justify a great deal of time focusing on right now. I’m thrilled that he spoke at the Arab American Institute — and I saw that he was hugely popular there.
    But I’m a realist. And that’s pretty much the strongest current driving my topics and comments on the blog — and Paul has to do much more than he has done to convince someone like me that his presidential ambitions are worth focusing on. I am glad that he is writing constructive letters and trying to get traction.
    On that front, I’ll see about some more Ron Paul related commentary.
    best to you,
    steve clemons

    Reply

  30. PissedOffAmerican says:

    I guess Steve chooses to ignore the fact that Ron Paul signed such a letter to the President over a year ago.
    No suprise there.
    Did you see Guilianni was caught hiring people to discredit Ron Paul?
    Remember Hillary, caught conversing with Obama about purposelly excluding candidates from the debates?
    The media hiding poll results showing Ron Paul a clear winner on some televised debates.
    What are the media, Washington, and the so called “insiders” like Steve afraid of? Having the Gravy Train derailed?

    Reply

  31. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “Dear PissedOffAmerican, if you google Chuck Hagel on youtube, you can see other things he has said prior to this letter…..”
    I could care less what he has “said”. Saying ain’t doing. His actions in regards to his investmemnt in ES&S, and his vote to continue to allow Gonzales unprecedented powers of “appointment” are all I need to know about Hagel. That, and the fact he has not advocated holding Bush accountable for illegal and impeachable offenses committed against our Constitution and our nation’s best interests.

    Reply

  32. erichwwk says:

    What is sad in this latest empire venture is the refusal to recognize that the US is the criminal here. Instead of kowtowing to the administration, we should be insisting on bringing the US criminals before a war crimes tribunal.
    Daily Kos comes much closer to getting it right:
    http://tinyurl.com/25ywzf
    For those unaware of the extent to which the US is in violation of the NPT, the UN resolutions on nuclear weapons, and the International Court of Justice 1996 opinions on the use, and threat of use, of nuclear weapons check out this 2006 Amy Goodman interview of Greg Mello from the Los Alamos study group. http://tinyurl.com/2xuzbc
    Why , after 50 years of UK abuse, and an additional 50 years of US attempt to colonialize Iran, are we still demonizing Iran, rather than accepting responsibility for what we have done, and are continuing to do? Some day the US will be held to account for its war crimes, the issue at play in the Mukasey hearing.

    Reply

  33. KA says:

    I could not agree with Sen. Hagel more.
    It is important to note that for the US government to appear, once again, as a rational body, it needs to pay more attention to this letter. Iranian government, unlike the past Iraqi government, make very calculated decisions. The very fact that they have keep repeating that they will “defend” an “invader” shows their fears of that day. So there is no need to worry about negotiating because of weakness.
    What the US government needs more than anything in the international arena (and especially in the Middle East) is partners. I think it would be a unwise and unproductive move on the part the US government to become politically isolated because of the government of Iran, whose moves (not the rhetoric) are very calculated and predictable. (unlike the west, rhetoric do not carry as much weight in Iran, which also show why the Iranian governments does not take Bush-Chaney language too seriously).
    The central objective of every Middle Eastern governments is survive. Therefore, none would initiate any moves that may question its survival under normal circumstances. The nightmare for the Middle East is when, just like Iraq, the government has nothing to loose.

    Reply

  34. arthurdecco says:

    What a steaming pile of doggy doo, jpowell!
    Islamofascists, indeed!
    And to think how long it must have taken you to copy all this hysterical gobbeley gook from the Nutters’ sites that crank it out non-stop.
    Even the Jews of Iran are refusing to leave their country despite of the generous financial incentives and the over-the-top emotional entreaties from the only REAL fascists in the Middle East – the Israeli government.
    Do you really think that there would be a ground swell of support for American interventions in Iran from the general populace? And if so, what mind bending drugs are you abusing these days?
    Do you remember what was supposed to happen in Iraq? Where American soldiers were supposed to be met with flowers after the fall of Saddam?
    How did that work out?

    Reply

  35. Jpowell says:

    There is no shortage of proposals regarding what to do about the present Iran conundrum. Some proposals are authored by experts such as Henry Kissinger, while others are put forward by a variety of lesser luminaries.
    I am one of the lesser luminaries. I have been observing and worrying about my country of birth, Iran, ever since a gang of murderous Mullahs and their functionaries assumed power. To my infinite regret and the regret of millions of Iranians, the situation in Iran under the fascist rule of Mullahs is rapidly deteriorating in every respect.
    The Iranians, historically among the most civilized and tolerant of mankind’s peoples, are now viewed as the base recruits of a primitive seventh century barbaric campaign of Islamofascism. Iran, under the stranglehold and machinations of the Mullahs, has been transformed, in less than three decades, to the lead perpetrator of all that is abhorrent to humanity.
    The ?Iran Problem? is now a world problem. The question is, what to do about Iran?
    Pivotal to the success of any solution is first the realization that Islam is a religion of death and misery. A few facts are presented below to support this assertion.
    * The Quran itself repeatedly glorifies death, killing and dying for Islam. It promises the faithful infinite rewards for his Jihad in Allah?s paradise.
    * Nearly all Islamic holy days, particularly those of the Shiite sect, are observances and re-enactments associated with death.
    * The Palestinian territory is festooned with huge portraits of the ?martyrs,? the suicide bombers that the rest of the world recognizes them for what they are.
    * Streets, parks and all manner of public places in the Islamic Republic of Iran are named after ?martyrs? of various sorts.
    * Sheikh Hasan Nasrullah, the leader of Hezbollah in Lebanon and the pawn of Iran?s Mullahs, assured the world of Hezbollah?s victory over Israel by proudly announcing: ?we will prevail, because the Israelis want to live, and we relish death.?
    The litany of Islamic death-based beliefs and actions is long indeed. It is, therefore, understandable that Iran?s Mullahs are obsessed agents of death. Islam, the Mullahs? and their fanatic follower?s system of belief, denigrates life and glorifies death. To these people, death is not death. It is martyrdom, a sure passage to the unimaginably magnificent eternal paradise promised in the Quran.
    Under the rule of these adherents of death, everything in Iran is deteriorating and dying. In spite of huge oil revenues, the per capita income of the Iranians is now about one third of what it was before the Islamic Revolution of 1979. Every form of misery has also skyrocketed. Drug addiction, prostitution and suicide have gone through the roof. The young and the educated continue deserting Iran and family, fleeing to the four corners of the earth in search of a decent life.
    To make matters worse, the agents of death, the Mullahs, divert the sorely needed funds at home to sponsor and support adventurous Islamic trouble-making abroad. They supply weapons, provide funds, and train any and all takers who share their wanton campaign of terrorism anywhere in the world.
    Dissatisfaction with the rule of the Mullahs is widespread. Students, traditionally the vanguard of political and social reform in Iran, continue their valiant struggle in the face of torture, imprisonment and death. Labor unions, although tightly controlled, are in a constant state of rebellion against the inhumane treatments by the state. Ethnic and religious minorities suffering under the ruthless Islamic injustice and Pogrom-like measures are ripe for mass eruption.
    The lifeblood of Iran?s economy is oil and natural gas. The criminal neglect and squandering of these vital and irreplaceable resources holds a future of even more severe hardship for the Iranian people. Impartial expert studies show that Iran?s oil production, at the present rate of exploitation and absence of maintenance, will decline by nearly ten percent per year and will hit zero by 2015.
    Corruption and mismanagement, combined with the huge allocation of resources to acquire nuclear weapons, are bound to burden the country?s badly ailing economy that will likely bury the Mullahs in the rubble of their own making and grant them their death wish. Regrettably, these purveyors of death aim to hurt and kill many innocent people along the way to their inevitable looming graves.
    Over the years, much of the world has been preoccupied with its own problems and shown little concern for the plight of the Iranian people until the Mullahs installed a firebrand Islamist, Ahmadinejad, as the President of the country. This man, called ?The Monkey,? by many Iranians is now alarming the world by being at the control of the Islamofascist train and throttling it full speed ahead for a cataclysmic collision. Ahamadinejad and his gang are loading their guns and doing all they can to obtain the bomb to bring about the biggest and most dreadful death that would usher in the ?Mahdi?, their savior-ruler of the world.
    What can the world do is the huge question. Some advocate military solutions of various types, ranging from surgical bombings of Iran?s nuclear facilities, to military occupation of its oil-producing regions along the Persian Gulf to a full occupation of the country. Each and every one of these trigger-happy solutions is doomed to failure, since they will play directly into the hands of the Mullahs. Any military action against Iran will encounter Iranians? fierce sense of national pride that would rally the people to the support of the regime. Military actions would compound the problem by creating a greater worldwide Islamic solidarity against the perceived ?Crusaders-Zionists? conspiracy.
    There are those who see the solution in negotiation with the Mullahs. These people are either naﶥ or dishonest. Mullahs? negotiation is Islamic to the core. They take all and you give all since you, according to the Islamic fiat, are not entitled to anything. One can see how Muslims negotiate even among themselves in places like Iraq, the Palestinian territory, Pakistan and every other Islamic land.
    The most promising solution is in the free world?s united support of the Iranian opposition groups to overthrow the rule of the Mullahs. The Iranian people themselves are fully capable and are determined to remove the cancer of Islamism from their country. The United States and Israel and other democracies have a huge stake in the success of the Iranian people to rid themselves of the Islamic tyranny.
    As I have briefly outlined above, the Mullahs are highly vulnerable. A comprehensive political, moral and economic measure by the United States and others offers the best chance of ending the Mullah’s reign of terror and diffusing the existential threat they pose to the world. The Bible says, ?From those who are much given, much is demanded.? Perhaps it is for this reason that the people of the United States of America, once again, are called upon to make huge sacrifices to defeat another tyranny. It is important that this great nation stays the course and, enlists its power in support of freedom-loving Iranians to topple the ruling Islamofascits who are bent on wreaking death and destruction of the world.
    It is also important to keep in mind Albert Einstein?s warning, ?The world is a dangerous place not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.?
    And when it comes to doing something the prudent way, it is good to follow the advice of the ancient Persians: ?The lion of the meadow of Mazandaran can be captured by no other than a Mazadarani warrior.? The best match for the ruthless Mullahs and their hired Islamic storm troopers are the Iranian warriors themselves. The people of Iran themselves are the best solution for the present Iranian conundrum. The valiant Iranians need a bit of help. And the last thing they need is appeasing negotiators to give the Mullahs a new lease on life, or invasion by the Marines, or a shower of bombs from the skies.

    Reply

  36. Connie P. says:

    Dear PissedOffAmerican, if you google Chuck Hagel on youtube, you can see other things he has said prior to this letter. Mainstream media does not cover voices of decent from Republicans or Democrats. I don’t want to criticize anyone who is willing to speak up. It’s never too late to speak up. Chuck Hagel said in front of the Senate, ‘America is not a Monarchy’. He even referenced IMPEACHMENT! Now, that takes courage, Republican neocons are cannibals, they eat their own! They just burp and move along! I would thank anyone right now willing to stand up for America. Thank you Chuck Hagel!

    Reply

  37. Niall Mac Allister MD says:

    Have we completly forgotten the moral priorities – the’Carpenters’ Son’ his message forgotten – are we on the path to WW 111 and maybe 4 – Armageddon at the hands of the ‘Yaley boy’s booze club Pres.,’ – the ‘majority American ‘voice’ ignored? Our presence in over 135 countries now – struggling to sew the seed of Americas’ murderous ‘hegemony’ – holocaust etc.,- already forgotten, Dresden, Nagasaki, Hiroshima, the Agent Orange genocide in Cambodia, etc., etc., to the ‘Indian Genocide’ and much much more – our close pals ‘the Saudi Princes’ and our ‘torture routines – better give time to the other ‘voice’ of ‘the richest country in the world’ – our social services and health care a ‘joke’ now # 38 or worse in the world. Americans listen to Chomsky and others – find your way back to the muted majority. Regards Niall Mac Allister Fdr and Pres., Friendships Without Borders’ conciliation and community Health among our priorities etc.,

    Reply

  38. Niall Mac Allister MD says:

    Have we completly forgotten the moral priorities – the’Carpenters’ Son’ his message forgotten – are we on the path to WW 111 and maybe 4 – Armageddon at the hands of the ‘Yaley boy’s booze club Pres.,’ – the ‘majority American ‘voice’ ignored? Our presence in over 135 countries now – struggling to sew the seed of Americas’ murderous ‘hegemony’ – holocaust etc.,- already forgotten, Dresden, Nagasaki, Hiroshima, the Agent Orange genocide in Cambodia, etc., etc., to the ‘Indian Genocide’ and much much more – our close pals ‘the Saudi Princes’ and our ‘torture routines – better give time to the other ‘voice’ of ‘the richest country in the world’ – our social services and health care a ‘joke’ now # 38 or worse in the world. Americans listen to Chomsky and others – find your way back to the muted majority. Regards Niall Mac Allister Fdr and Pres., Friendships Without Borders’ conciliation and community Health among our priorities etc.,

    Reply

  39. Niall Mac Allister MD says:

    Have we completly forgotten the moral priorities – the’Carpenters’ Son’ his message forgotten – are we on the path to WW 111 and maybe 4 – Armageddon at the hands of the ‘Yaley boy’s booze club Pres.,’ – the ‘majority American ‘voice’ ignored? Our presence in over 135 countries now – struggling to sew the seed of Americas’ murderous ‘hegemony’ – holocaust etc.,- already forgotten, Dresden, Nagasaki, Hiroshima, the Agent Orange genocide in Cambodia, etc., etc., to the ‘Indian Genocide’ and much much more – our close pals ‘the Saudi Princes’ and our ‘torture routines – better give time to the other ‘voice’ of ‘the richest country in the world’ – our social services and health care a ‘joke’ now # 38 or worse in the world. Americans listen to Chomsky and others – find your way back to the muted majority. Regards Niall Mac Allister Fdr and Pres., Friendships Without Borders’ conciliation and community Health among our priorities etc.,

    Reply

  40. PissedOffAmerican says:

    But anyway, Steve, thanks for the heads up on Hagel’s letter. Without you showing it to us, I never would have found out about the heroic bipartisan efforts that occurred over a year ago on our nation’s behalf.
    Hagel must of been busy with with making sure Gonzales retained his ability to fully politicize our Justice Department.
    Posturing is haaaaaard work.

    Reply

  41. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Shhhhh, hey Steve, don’t tell anybody, but guess what? Ron Paul was a signer of the letter sent to the President, SENT OVER A YEAR AGO. Golly, I don’t see Hagel’s name on the list.
    Shhhhhhh, its a secret.
    Other members who have signed the letter…..
    …..include…..
    Gil Gutknecht (R-Minnesota), Ron Paul (R-Texas), Vic Snyder (D-Arkansas), John R. “Randy” Kuhl Jr. (R-New York), Roscoe Bartlett (R-Maryland), Jim Kolbe (R-Arizona), Elijah Cummings (D-Maryland), Earl Blumenauer (D-Oregon), John J. Duncan Jr. (R-Tennessee), David Price (D-North Carolina), Jim Leach (R-Iowa), John Olver (D–Massachusetts), Walter Jones, (R-North Carolina), Peter DeFazio (D-Oregon), Joe Schwartz (R-Michigan), Maurice Hinchey (D-New York), Phil English (R-Pennsylvania), C.L. “Butch” Otter (D-Idaho).

    Reply

  42. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Gee, it appears Hagel might be a bit behind the eight ball on this one…..
    http://www.niacouncil.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=458&Itemid=2
    Bipartisan Letter Urging US-Iran Diplomacy Gains 19 Signatories
    Shervin Boloorian
    Oct 02, 2006
    Washington DC – On September 29th, 2006, a bipartisan group of 19 Members of Congress introduced a letter to President George W. Bush requesting that he affirm his recent pledge of support to the Iranian people (as quoted in a recent Washington Post interview) by approving direct talks with Iran. Referencing the current US-Iran nuclear situation, the letter asserts, “If we hope to convince the American people, our allies, and the international community that we are committed to resolving this matter diplomatically, the US must open up direct diplomatic channels with Tehran.”
    The letter, which is sponsored by Rep. Wayne Gilchrest (R-MD) and signed by conservatives, moderates, and progressives alike and members from both major political parties, is the first public bipartisan call for US participation in diplomacy with Iran.
    While it contains new provisions and a larger group of signatories, the letter resembles a similar correspondence drafted by 12 Republicans in early June also calling direct diplomatic contact between the US and Iran.
    It correctly points out that neither country has engaged in formal negotiations to discuss grievances with the other for 26 years and notes support for a diplomatic channel from such renowned international figures as Kofi Annan, Mohammad El-Baradei and Angela Merkel.
    While the letter implicitly acknowledges that Iran’s stance toward the US is adversarial, it suggests that US diplomats have historically scored significant victories through negotiation with other adversaries. “There are seldom occasions in history where a great country should fear dialogue with a potential adversary. On the contrary, dialogue is needed to explain clearly the compelling nature America’s objectives in the Middle East,” the letter asserts.
    Last week, a number of the letter’s signatories joined Rep. Gilchrest in voicing their opposition to the controversial HR 6198, otherwise known as the Iran Freedom Support Act (IFSA), bill during House floor debate. Those members include Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), James Leach (R-IA), Maurice Hinchey (D-NY), and Ron Paul (R-TX).
    For more information or to view a list of the signatories, visit Rep. Gilchrest’s webpage at: http://gilchrest.house.gov/news.asp?FormMode=Detail&ID=308 .

    Reply

  43. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Its interesting that Hagel has grabbed the limelight here, despite…..
    http://www.niacouncil.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=750&Itemid=2
    Congressmen Moran, Gilchrest and NIAC President call for diplomacy
    Shabnam Sahandy
    Apr 26, 2007
    Washington DC – “All of the options we are currently looking at, even dialogue, are grounded in a context of conflict and hostility,” NIAC President Trita Parsi said Monday at a George Mason University conference sponsored by the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution. Parsi noted that what is needed is not merely a policy but a paradigm shift. Even a shift towards dialogue would fail to avoid conflict if embedded in a larger program which aims to “weaken and push back Iran” through steps like funding ethnic separatist groups inside the country, he argued. Iran’s stance, Parsi added, is not unlike that of the US. “What the Iranians say is in the context of enmity as well.”
    Focusing on averting armed conflict with Iran, the round table discussion included Congressmen James Moran (D-VA) and Wayne Gilchrest (R-MD), as well as Jake Colvin of USA Engage and Joseph Montville, a retired US diplomat.
    Moderator Richard Rubenstein, professor of Conflict Resolution at GMU, lead off with a brief historical overview of US-Iran tensions. In his analysis, the roots of US-Iran enmity lie in the 1953 ouster of Iranian nationalist leader Mohammed Mosaddeq. “That coup, it seems to me, was very important to the people of Iran, more so than to their American counterparts, because it represented such a great betrayal.” Rubenstein noted that many Iranians at the time saw the US as a savior from the colonial interventions of Britain and Russia, so the coup came as a great shock, as did US support for the Shah’s authoritarian reign in the years that followed.
    One of the main problems, said Congressman Jim Moran, is that the current leaders on both sides represent “something of an aberration.” According to the Virginia lawmaker, both presidents have departed from the ordinary in terms of their foreign policy goals. “I don’t think this administration is inclined to reach any sort of constructive dialogue,” Moran said. In response, some audience members pointed to positive signs from the administration, including the selection of Defense Secretary Robert Gates, and recent attempts by Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to have five Iranian officials being held in Iraq released. Moran countered that these two figures are not in fact policy architects but rather policy implementers, and as such, can do little to bring about real change.
    Another roadblock identified by Colvin is the new push for more sanctions on Iran. Colvin said that the success of sanctions regimes in the past has been overstated. “There is often more going on behind the scenes with sanctions that we give credit for. South Africa involved both multinational pressure and dialogue, as did Libya.” Colvin said that sanctions have been in place in Iran for decades, and alone, have done little to affect the behavior of the government. Making small additions to the same program, he said, would not likely have any effect. “Sanctions didn’t stop Saddam from building palaces or Kim Jong-il from sponsoring a nuclear weapons program while his people were forced to eat grass.”
    Congressman Wayne Gilchrest, co-chair of the Congressional Dialogue Caucus, drew a parallel between America’s approach to Iran and Vietnam. In both cases, diplomatic relations didn’t exist. In Vietnam that led to war, but with Iran diplomacy is still possible, Gilchrest argued. He noted that Ho Chi Minh initially turned to the United States for help in casting off the yoke of colonialism before becoming one of the US’s greatest enemies. The Maryland lawmaker also pointed to the success of diplomacy in the case of the Nixon administration’s outreach to the Chinese, indicating that the same is possible with Iran.
    Many of the panelists emphasized the importance of “second track diplomacy” including Montville. Cultural exchanges and a transatlantic coordination of NGOs were described as possible gateways to higher level diplomacy. This view was affirmed by Congressman Gilchrest who said that “the collective ingenuity of individuals across this globe’ can ultimately succeed in repairing the broken relationship of Iran and the United States.”

    Reply

  44. Lee Mortimer says:

    I am very pleased that Sen. Hagel has taken this step in trying to head off the Cheney-Bush war plans. In an Oct. 20 interview with the Kansas City Star, Hagel raised the prospect of “an intentional misrepresentation” by “some in the administration who would like to find some excuse to take military action against Iran.” He clearly is aware of the danger we face.
    The misspellings and grammatical errors in Hagel’s letter are a little concerning. After all, this is a senior U.S. Senator writing to the President of the United States. It is said that Hagel writes his own communications, which included his 11-26-06 Washington Post op-ed, “Leaving Iraq, Honorably.” This is laudable, but he could use a good proofreader.

    Reply

  45. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Steve, you failed to mention to us that this letter was sent to Bush two weeks ago. Obviously, if any White House reaction was forthcoming, you would have recieved word by now. Like all dissention, albiet rare, that has been cast towards Bush policy, we can expect the White House to ignore Hagel’s belated efforts. After all, Hagel and his Washington compatriots have abetted Bush now for seven years, completely avoiding any substantive efforts to hold this Executive Administration accountable.
    Hagel has made clear that he is exiting the arena. This letter is his attempt to say to history, “Don’t blame me, I didn’t do it”. But the truth is, he, and everyone of these fucking cowards in Washington DID do it, by ignoring their oaths of office and standing idly by while this Administration committed a long line of impeachable offenses. There is not one single Senator or Congressman in Washington that has held our nation’s interests above their warped sense of partisan loyalty, with the exception of three or four whose efforts you have purposelly, willfully, and completely IGNORED.
    Should this out of control and unaccountable Administration further pursue the dangerous and destructive path they are currently traveling on Hagel and his fellow Senators and Congressman ALL share responsibility, no matter which side of the aisle they stand on.

    Reply

  46. mlaw230 says:

    It seems quite obvious now, that our mission in this region had different goals for different parts of the coalition that makes up this administration. Unfortunately, these had nothing to do with the public motivations.
    To many, the rise of China and India as oil markets, meant that if Iran, perhaps allied with Russia were to set up its own “oil bourse” the United States could for the first time be in the position that oil producers would not have to sell oil to the west. In the past, this was not so, whatever the political make up of the producing nation, the ruling elite had to sell to the west in order to maintain its economy.
    If a separate central Asian relationship were allowed to develop and then allowed to hide behind a nuclear shield, America would no longer be in the commanding strategic position it otherwise enjoys.The impact economically could be catastrophic, and the option of simply seizing the oil fields if push came to shove would be forever gone, even as a threat.
    To others, the fear of Islam, and Islamic terrorism which is essentially a racial/cultural idea rather than a state concept, threatened the very concepts of nationalism /statism. The timing, coming, just after and perhaps as a result of the end of the cold war had contributed to a decline in such institutions and alliances, posed the threat of anarchy and a substantive change in the game that we had, until that time been winning.
    A third, much smaller group seems enamored with the idea of a world wide cultural/religious war.
    Consequently, all roads then, and I am afraid now, lead to Tehran. Iraq is simply the Iwo Jima of the Central Asian war. We need it as a staging area, to get basing out of Saudi Arabia, and in order to project power deeper into Central Asia, and not incidentally to control a large part of the fresh water in the region.
    The Administration apparently believes this is a binary equation, we either win in Central Asia or we lose, and in this case they define losing as not controlling the region with certainty and slipping beyond our theoretical military control. Consequently, from their jaded, yet rational, perspective they really do not have a choice but to seek regime change in Tehran, by whatever means necessary.

    Reply

  47. kotzabasis says:

    The Bush administration being presumably aware of this fact, i.e., of the complete inadequacy of the old diplomacy, of which so many of its “encoreists”, such as Richard Holbrooke and Madeleine Albrightand now Chuck Hagel, are continuing to give it “standing ovations”, does seem to be willing–despite its tactical errors in Iraq that have given rise to a rampant insurgency making the war more difficult to win and as a result of this making some members of the Administration more circumspect to launch another attack, this time on Iran–to take leave of its circumspection and embrace a more hawkish diplomacy that would be much more successful than the effete and barren diplomacy of the past. Such robust diplomacy will not be draped in the smooth velvety apparels of “old” Europe or in the tattered garments of the United Nations, but will be draped in the bristling carapace of a porcupine. While there will not be a scarcity of carrots in the exercise of this armed diplomacy, the sticks will be deadly in their threatening application against those intransigent nations that continue overtly or covertly to sponsor terrorists and use them as proxies to achieve their geopolitical and millenarian goals. The axis of Iran, Syria, and Hezbollah will have the kiss of death planted on its forehead by this no “frills” American diplomacy. But the angel of death in this new diplomacy will be last in the queue…

    Reply

  48. Dirk says:

    Well it looks like our monthly bill for the war is going to be a tad bit higher. Japan has decided to stop refueling our ships for free in the Indian Ocean.
    From yahoo: TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan ordered its naval ships on Thursday to withdraw from a refueling mission in support of U.S.-led operations in Afghanistan as a political deadlock kept the government from meeting a deadline to extend the activities.
    http://tinyurl.com/2t6seq

    Reply

  49. Hiroshi Burnette says:

    There comes a point in negotiations when we finally realize that all options have failed. The real solution to US foreign policy problems is to abort Bush and Cheney. I believe the Roman senate did something similar to Julius Caesar. Who will play Brutus?

    Reply

  50. Zimbabalouie says:

    Quickly two comments on the above comments. First the note just above about the misspellings and omissions. Seems to this writer that the likelyhood that Mr. Bush will read or even be capable of noting any misspellings is slim.
    Secondly the comments pointing to the futilness of Mr. Hagels letter seem to forget that this letter is less a message to the administration and more a statement boldly declaring that the Israeli lobby should take notice that a different course of action regarding Irans perceived threat to the world is an overdo reality. By painting the the Iranian nation with the same old pallete that they used in Iraq, Vietnam, Korea, and countless other enemies of Israel this administration is stepping ever closer to the reality of impeachments.
    The question to ask Mr. Hagel and the few other sane political and military leaders is, what if anything are they prepared to do if the Zionist controlled administration and congress fail to acknowledge the urgent need to follow a true diplomatic course with Iran? Is there anyone in this country willing to stop the coming events with Iran?
    We who write opinions on blogs understansd that this nations government is not only going to attack Iran but they are also going to simultaneously complete the destruction of the American constitution. While they send troops to Iran this administration is going unleash their private armies of Blackwater, Dyncorp, and other contract soldiers on Americans to impose their facist takeover of this country.
    Laugh if you will, but history repeats itself and never more true when the second and third generations of the same players comeback for a second try using the same old playbook.
    Good luck Mr. Hagel. My children need you to succeed.

    Reply

  51. Zimbabalouie says:

    Quickly two comments on the above comments. First the note just above about the misspellings and omissions. Seems to this writer that the likelyhood that Mr. Bush will read or even be capable of noting any misspellings is slim.
    Secondly the comments pointing to the futilness of Mr. Hagels letter seem to forget that this letter is less a message to the administration and more a statement boldly declaring that the Israeli lobby should take notice that a different course of action regarding Irans perceived threat to the world is an overdo reality. By painting the the Iranian nation with same old pallete that they used in Iraq, Vietnam, Korea, and countless other enemies of Israel this administration is stepping ever closer to the reality of impeachments.
    The question to ask Mr. Hagel and the few other sane political and military leaders is, what if anything are they prepared to do if the Zionist controlled administration and congress fail to acknowledge the urgent need to follow a true diplomatic course with Iran? Is there anyone in this country willing to stop the coming events with Iran?
    We who write opinions on blogs understansd that this nations government is not only going to attack Iran but they are also going to simultaneously complete the destruction of the American constitution. While they send troops to Iran this administration is going unleash their private armies of Blackwater, Dyncorp, and other contract soldiers on Americans to impose their facist takeover of this country.
    Laugh if you will, but history repeats itself and never more true when the second and third generations of the same players comeback for a second try using the same old playbook.
    Good luck Mr. Hagel. My children need you to succeed.

    Reply

  52. Connie P. says:

    I want to thank Chuck Hagel for his effort. Chuck Hagel has spoken out on many occasions. After watching him on Real Time with Bill Maher, I thought it would make news. Unfortunately, mainstream media does not cover voices of decent. When I googled him on youtube, I found he made many speeches that were saying what I wanted to hear. I wish more people would speak �Truth to Power�.
    I would like to see Al Gore run in �08 and pick Chuck Hagel as his running mate. It�s time for change in America, away from the divisive party lines. I would like to see a Strong Voice representing Democrats and a Strong Voice representing Republicans. It�s time Americans are united and not divided along party lines. Neither party is uniting the country. Politicians are so busy positioning for themselves, we are all just casualties of party politics. I would like an �American Party� united to represent all Americans who are not happy with the current go-along to get-along politics.

    Reply

  53. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Gads, I just now noticed the misspellings and ommissions in the text of Hagel’s letter. I am no stickler for literary perfection, as anyone who has read my postings can attest. But jeez, this is a State’s Senator, writing to the President of the United States. Who proof read the damned thing? No one?

    Reply

  54. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Gee, after these clowns put the last nail in our proverbial coffin by attacking Iran, I wonder if these bright eyed and bushy tailed guardians of our interests, like Hagel, will regret sitting around with their thumbs up their asses for seven years.

    Reply

  55. Chris C says:

    Senator Hagel’s sentiments in this letter are a welcome change from the tenor of so much right wing drumbeating about the “existential” threat of a nuclear Iran. What to many people is a common sense approach to solving problems (conducting oneself in a diplomatic manner through negotiations) seems almost a shock to the system after so many years of demonizing Iran. Certainly Senator Hagel has ulterior motives for cautioning the president about using belligerence as national policy: running away from the Cheney neocon wing’s shotgun approach to national interest; sending signals to traditional conservatives that not everyone in Washington is willing to attack anything that moves in the world; and strongly hinting that a reformation of the Republican Party along more classically held conservative traditions and beliefs is overdue.
    I am not invested in Republican anything these days, but I welcome Hagel’s more moderated tone about how to establish national and international policy. However, it is one voice, not a chorus. I’ll wait for the choir before applauding…

    Reply

  56. RumRunner says:

    This may be an unfortunate move by Hagel.
    Petulant adolescent that Bush is, he obviously likes nothing more than saying no to (or ignoring) anybody who tries to make him change his mind.

    Reply

  57. Robert R Clough says:

    Regarding the above posts, “Perhaps”! I doubt if Hagel is under any illusions as to whether Bush will do more than read the letter. What is important, to my mind, is that Hagel wrote the letter and how he said what he said. I have not finished it or Mullen’s reaction yet – I wanted to write this.
    This is another Congressional step away from Bush and, perhaps, a step towards a Congressional resolution away from war with Iran. The Cheney and Podhoretz crowd do not have the assured control they once had. The Army cannot do the job, the Navy does not wish to, the Air Force, the flyboys, want to. Maybe, just maybe, those long range artillerymen and truckdrivers will have some sense knocked into them.
    Robert R. Clough – Thorncraft

    Reply

  58. JohnH says:

    Lurker–the US oil supply is of secondary concern, since it is relatively protected. Bush/Cheney and the neocons wanted to control the WORLD oil supply and dole it out to the nations of the world according to whether they were being good boys or not. Israel and Britain were part of the imperial project, so their future supplies were to be assured. Israel’s security and local hegemony was also supposed to be a collateral beneficiary of the project, although they have been more worried about Iran than Iraq for some time.
    If you look at the coalition of the willing, there was not a single major oil supplier apart from Britain, Norway and Azerbaijan. North Sea oil production is dropping precipitously, and Britain now imports oil. Azerbaijan needed protection from the big Russian bear. Kuwait hosted the US and also needed protection. But the other major oil suppliers understood the great game and wanted no part of it. Even Canada and Mexico opted out.

    Reply

  59. DonS says:

    . . . and BTW, just where does the “appeasement” analogy have even remote bearing with the disproportionate US/Iran military force/inevitable massive retaliation for any [questioanable future] nuclear threat ?
    Oh yeah, I forgot. Its all about perceived Israeli interests . . . and swagger.

    Reply

  60. MNPundit says:

    …and for all that, this letter will be ignored by Cheney and never read by Bush.
    Move along home.

    Reply

  61. DonS says:

    Re the oil, and the economy, disrupting the Iranian flow is a big mistake I am led to believe.
    So, maybe not to bomb Iraq oil interests . . .
    But, bombing their air defenses, military capabilities, nuke-associated things — just as a little sop to the neos. Maybe so.
    Many probably heard Podhoretz on New Hour the other night (BTW, what’s with PBS giving such a lunatic air time, just because junior does). He invoked Hitlarian comparisons, directly, for anyone not saavy enough to see that bombing Iraq is a no brainer. We’re all Chamberlains, at best.
    With the kind of pressure that’s coming from the neo/AIPAC brigade, abetted by the stenographic/entertainmentistic media, do we have a chance?

    Reply

  62. Lurker says:

    At the most we got 17% of our oil from the Middle East. The majority of our oil comes from Mexico and Canada.
    These wars are about Israel, and we’re all going to die because of the power of the pro-Israel lobbies and their enablers.
    May we all rest in peace because that’s the only peace we are going to get.

    Reply

  63. JohnH says:

    Steve and the rest of the foreign policy establishment refuse to talk about it much, but here is the definitive explanation for the Iraq invasion and the pending attack on Iran:
    http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/174856
    Iraq and Iran were the ultimate imperial power grab. Controlling their energy assets would have forced other nations to bow down before the almighty Bush/Cheney: “The goal of unfettered American access to sufficient Middle Eastern oil would, if achieved and sustained, deprive other countries of sufficient oil, or require them to satisfy U.S. demands in order to access it…these ambitions, and the actions taken to implement them, rested on a vision of an imperial America that should, could, and would play a uniquely dominant, problem-solving role in world affairs. All other countries would, of course, continue to be “vulnerable to economic crises” over which they would have “little control.” Only the United States had the essential right to threaten, or simply apply, overwhelming military power to the “problem” of energy; only it had the right to subdue any country that attempted to create — or exploit — an energy crisis, or that simply had the potential and animus to do so.”
    In fairness, Steve did once admit that oil was involved in Iraq. However, he has steadfastly refused to elaborate on the ambitions at stake, those mysterious “vital strategic interests.” Of course, with virtually the entire Washington establishment behind this project, it would have been hard to be a lone, straight talking voice.
    The only problem is, now that Br’er Bush is stuck to the Iraqi tar baby, how is he going to get the tar out of it? And has he decided to destroy the Iranian tar baby along with all its tar? It’s difficult to fathom how an attack will advance US interests or how it will lead to increased oil or gas production in the forseeable future. The only realistic outcome would appear to be revenge: if we can’t have it, then nobody can have it.

    Reply

  64. glenn says:

    I think that Bush is the least dangerous person in the Bush Administration.
    And, thinking that, I think that somewhere in his heart of hearts he is indeed worried about his legacy.
    And some kind of diplomatic contact with Iran similar to what Nixon did with China would go a long way to securing him at least one favorable footnote in the history books.
    And, realistically speaking, Hagel is right; we have more to gain by talking to Iran than we have by bombing them.
    Looking at it dispassionately, we would indeed accomplish far more by diplomacy in this instance at this time.

    Reply

  65. Ed Haley says:

    I would say to Sen. Hagel: OK,good solid letter sent to some of the principals (excluding the BOSS ,Cheney), thoughtful but not very special since thousands of us could have said the same things.We also have a pretty good idea that Bush/Cheney will do whatever they want -since their rationality really is to be questioned-and then what? The underlying truth that even Hagel seems to understand is that these people do not give a hoot in Hell about how we are viewed in the rest of the world nor do they care what price the American people have to pay. We really should stop acting as if we are confronted by reasonable people, simply misguided and in need of a little re-directing. These folks in charge are deranged and need to be treated as such. The Constitution is at risk and impeachment is required.

    Reply

  66. Ed Nashton says:

    A wonderful idea couched in a very poorly written letter.
    However, the problem is that we are too late. The cost benefit analysis favors Iran’s pursuit of a full nuclear fuel cycle — which will eventually result in the ability to produce a nuclear weapon. There is nothing that the US can offer at this point that will change that course.
    Had we adopted this sensible approach earlier in this process, we might have been able to secure Iranian cooperation. This is but one more error that history will punish this administration for.
    Now, we find ourselves on a collision course to complete a self-fulfilling neoconservative prophecy with the Islamic Republic. This is a very dangerous moment for our Republic indeed.

    Reply

  67. linda says:

    frankly, i think this is exactly the type of thing that will convince monkeyboy that bombing iran is the course to take. he must love someone like hagel groveling at his feet.
    and he’ll do it, just because he can.

    Reply

  68. Pete Runnette says:

    Excellent, but while the recommendation of one senator, able to be brushed off. Hagel needs to introduce as a resolution in the Senate, actively solicit public endorsement by as many foreign policy and military heavies – and presidential candidates – as possible, and even give Powell an opportunity to partially redeem himself, by stepping in front of what will otherwise be our third war during the term of this calamitous presidency.

    Reply

  69. jon says:

    Nice letter, but it really doesn’t have much meat to it.
    Why is it that Iran needs to negotiate productively with the US and modify its’ nuclear plans? US actions have so far brought great wealth to Iran, eliminated their primary enemy, and reinforced their most reactionary political elements while increasing national cohesion. Heckuva job.
    If the US wanted to negotiate they could try:
    Releasing the 5 diplomats seized in a raid on their Iraqi consulate and held for more than a year in violation of diplomatic norms;
    Rescinding the determination that the Revolutionary Guards are a terrorist organization;
    Reversing the additional financial pressures placed on their banks;
    Claiming that every IED explosion in Iraq and Afghanistan has an Iranian link;
    Publicly thanking Iran for the areas where they have worked together successfully on drugs and terrorism;
    Pulling back some of the more offensive military positions;
    Stop giving sanctuary to MEK and PJAK terrorists.
    Not that any of that is going to happen.
    To convince the rest of the world that there’s some substance behind our bark it’s going to take a lot more than a dog and pony show at the Security Council this time.
    Bush and Cheney are Hagel’s audience. Too bad they see their actions and strategy as the feature, not the bug.

    Reply

  70. JohnH says:

    “I believe we will find ourselves in a dangerous and increasingly isolated position in the coming months.”
    Is anyone working to make sure that the Bush administration will be isolated in the coming months?
    Repugs and the corporate media are surely not going to do anything. Democraps and the “realist” part of the foreign policy mob are too compromised. So it’s up to the saner elements of the armed forces along with like minded people around the world to confront these loonies.
    It’s time to REACH OUT and JOIN FORCES before Bush and Cheney take us all down with them.

    Reply

  71. MikeF says:

    “Thank you for considering my views.”
    He might as well have said “Thank you for pissing in my face”….what a joke….

    Reply

  72. ... says:

    >>Thank you for considering my views.<<
    this type of thinking gets one nowhere when dealing with warmongers. obviously hagel has some character and integrity.. he is making a mistake thinking the ones running us foreign policy have anything similar.

    Reply

  73. Peter Bourne says:

    Fine and responsible sentiments, but asking Bush to engage in diplomacy is like asking an elephant to play the violin-neither the inclination nor the competence.

    Reply

Leave a Reply to Mahyad Tousi Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *