Misreading Michael Hayden’s Role in the Intelligence Bureaucracy Wars: Negroponte Wants Hayden to Battle with — Not Help — Rumsfeld

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hayden.jpg
(President George W. Bush and Lt. General Michael Hayden)
The crack team that puts out the American Progress Action Fund’s “Progress Report” has its Mike Hayden review out, and its predictably critical.
But they get the Michael Hayden picture half-wrong. Hayden — and now the super spy Steve Kappes who was fired by Goss and who will be the new CIA Deputy — may become the best hope of knocking back Don Rumsfeld’s imperialism over the national intelligence capacity of the country.
They write:

INTELLIGENCE — General Discontent With Hayden
On Friday, Porter Goss unexpectedly resigned as head of the CIA, leaving behind an “utterly irresponsible” 18-month tenure at the agency and unanswered questions about his hurried departure. Today, the White House nominated deputy director of national intelligence Lt. Gen. Michael Hayden as Goss’s successor. “Bottom line, I believe he’s the wrong person, the wrong place, at the wrong time. We should not have a military person leading a civilian agency at this time,” said House Intelligence Committee Chairman Peter Hoekstra (R-MI) yesterday on Fox News Sunday, voicing the bipartisan concerns of lawmakers. Hayden has demonstrated a fundamental misunderstanding of the Constitution and has misled Congress under oath. His close ties to Vice Presidency Cheney, Director of National Intelligence John Negroponte, and the Department of Defense have led many members of Congress to conclude he is wrong man to gain the trust of the intelligence community and clean up the CIA after the “chaos” left by Goss.
‘UNDER THE SWAY’ OF RUMSFELD: Over the weekend, a bipartisan group of lawmakers spoke out opposing the nomination of a military officer to a civilian agency. If Hayden is confirmed, “military officers would run all the major spy agencies, from the ultra-secret National Security Agency to the Defense Intelligence Agency.” One former intelligence official said, “It seems to me the Pentagon grows even stronger now. . . . Every time there’s a change, it moves in that direction.” “I think…putting a general in charge is going to send the wrong signal through the agency here in Washington, but also to our agents in the field around the world,” said Hoekstra yesterday, who also added that there will “be the perception in the CIA” that Hayden would be under the sway of Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. One of Goss’s largest challenges at the CIA was gaining the trust of career officers, who resented that he brought in a group of his unqualified aides — called “the Gosslings” by CIA insiders — and appointed them to top positions. Even if Hayden retires from the military, he is unlikely to be trusted as the committed independent advocate that the CIA needs. “Now, just resigning commission and moving on, putting on a striped suit, a pinstriped suit versus an air force uniform, I don’t think makes much difference,” said Sen. Saxby Chambliss (R-GA). Senate Intelligence Committee Pat Roberts (R-KS), who in 2005 called Hayden “outstanding,” yesterday refused to offer his endorsement of the administration’s nominee: “I’m not in a position to say that I am for General Hayden and will vote for him.”

But I have a different take on Hayden than what the majority of pundits are floating.
The “Progress Report” on the left as well as many on the right are gut-slugging Hayden for his role in overseeing and defending the warrantless wire tap program. I think that this criticism is wholly deserved, and if anything, those Republican and Democratic Congressman should be ashamed of themselves for not adding riders, amendments, and pushing bills and holding hearings to make it clear to the president that the Congressional authorization that the administration sites as its legal source of power for the warrantless wiretaps did not include domestic, unsupervised and extra-judicial wiretapping and electronic eavesdropping authority.
Congress has done virtually nothing on this. So, Hayden deserves the criticism, but Congress deserves more.
But set aside the wiretap issue for the moment.
What is interesting is that nearly all the pundits or politicos who have a problem with Hayden, an Air Force General, are asserting that his appointment would consolidate Rumsfeld’s efforts to establish comprehensive military dominance over the nation’s national security intelligence bureaucracy.
This is probably wrong in my view.
Hayden going to head CIA is John Negroponte’s effort to wrest some of the ground back from Rumsfeld in the intelligence wars underway. Hayden directed the National Security Agency before joining Negroponte as his Deputy. Hayden will still report to Negroponte — and Hayden’s familiary and expertise with the military dimensions of intelligence will help Negroponte set Rumsfeld back a few squares.
Poter Goss — whether he was knocked out of the position for potentially embarrassing issues (HookerGate) involving his staff (or himself) or for legitimate reasons of managerial differences with Negroponte — was never up to the bureaucratic battles with the Pentagon that he needed to fight to fend of Rumsfeld’s national intelligence control ambitions.
Most intelligence insiders know that Negroponte has been losing power and leverage to Rumsfeld. Some even think that Negroponte has accepted this fate and acquiesced to Rumsfeldian dominance of his operation.
But this move of Hayden says that the game is not over. Negroponte is not putting at the CIA a Rumsfeld-henchman. He’s putting in someone who — despite the duplicity about the warrantless wiretaps — many military officials respect and trust, and someone who understands the intel world in ways that Goss will never be able to.
Michael Hayden represents a next round of internal battles between Negroponte and Rumsfeld.
And given the incredible damage that Rumsfeld is doing to this nation’s national security — I’ll keep my own powder dry on Negroponte and Hayden. I think that what they may be doing now is important and potentially constructive in constraining the Rumsfeld/Cheney cabal.
— Steve Clemons
UPDATE: This hotline just out from ABC News:

Turmoil continues at the CIA: No. 3 official Dusty Foggo expected to resign, according to Brian Ross and ABC’s Investigative Team.

Look like the sex scandal called HookerGate is taking its toll.
Update TWO: The Porter Goss-fired Super Spy Steve Kappes is Returning as Hayden’s Deputy at CIA
Negroponte and Hayden are serious.
They are attempting to restore order and morale at a beleaguered CIA and knock back Rumsfeld’s intel imperialism that has been a thorn in Hayden’s and Negroponte’s side this last year.
Hayden plans to bring back Steve Kappes, who was an early casualty of Porter Goss’s tenure.
— Steve Clemons

Comments

46 comments on “Misreading Michael Hayden’s Role in the Intelligence Bureaucracy Wars: Negroponte Wants Hayden to Battle with — Not Help — Rumsfeld

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  3. unionsbuerger says:

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    Reply

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  6. Nightprowlkitty says:

    Steve, even if what you say is true, that does not mean Hayden is a good man to take this spot. He has nothing but contempt for the Fourth Amendment (that is, the little he knows of it). In this case the enemy of my enemy can still be my enemy.

    Reply

  7. rb637 says:

    ==Narus ST-6400 and NarusInsight by Narus Ltd.==
    Under Gen. Michael V. Hayden the NSA has forced tecom companies to implement massive domestic spying hardware. Even though Gen. Hayden has said at the National Press Club that “As the director, I was the one responsible to ensure that this program was limited in its scope and disciplined in its application.” The NarusInsight is one type of domestic spying hardware. Capable of monitoring 10 billion bits of data per second in real-time. This means the NarusInsight can monitor an OC-192 in realtime. For reference 10 billion bits is 10 million Kbts, divide that by the average DSL user witch is 256 Kbts (10000000/256) you get monitoring of 39062.5 DSL lines in realtime for every piece of hardware. After data capture Narus softeware can replay data. What does this mean well acrodding too Narus website “Capabilities include playback of streaming media (for example, VoIP), rendering of Web pages, examination of e-mails and the ability to analyze the payload/attachments of e-mail or file transfer protocols.” Think of it as Tivo for the internet able to replay 39000 US DSL users activity in realtime for every piece of hardware. They Talk about limits but this hardware is anything but.
    References:
    Narus Ltd http://narus.com,
    NATIONAL PRESS CLUB Transcript: http://www.globalsecurity.org/intell/library/news/2006/intell-060123-dni01.htm http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1564046/posts
    Hoover’s company factsheet: http://www.hoovers.com/narus/–ID__60701–/free-co-factsheet.xhtml
    Report by bewert: http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2006/4/8/14724/28476
    EFF case against AT&T http://www.eff.org/legal/cases/att/att_complaint_amended.pdf
    All websits have been saved to preserve history.

    Reply

  8. derrick says:

    The economy is gonna go kaaaaa-pluwee; the wealthy will have been well shored up in their finances; the lower classes will seek revenge; our whole intelligence apparatus is being overhauled to defend the Republicans and their contributors in the economic tumult that’s about to come. All the key positions have nearly been filled to take care of the internal sore losers of the darwinian capitalist game, the terrorists within.

    Reply

  9. Cross Eyed Mary says:

    “In the shuffling madness of the locomotive breath go the all time losers headlong to their death”. – Ian Anderson. Jethro Tull. . . Bootsy

    Reply

  10. Betsy L. Angert says:

    Dear Steven Clemons . . .
    I thank you for this great piece. Yesterday, I was diligently working on a treatise taking a similar stance. Today, I shared it and a reader referred me to yours. I added a link in my post to yours. It is refreshing to discover others think the same might be true.
    I invite you to read my missive and share your thoughts. GENERAL HAYDEN NOMINATED. HOPE REIGNS FOR RUMSFELD RESIGNATION? �
    It is only the giving that makes us what [who] we are. – Ian Anderson. Jethro Tull. . . Betsy

    Reply

  11. leveymg says:

    Steve –
    As is normally the case with matters involving covert operations that become embarassingly public, there are at least three layers to the NSA and CIA spy scandals, all of which prominently feature General Michael Hayden in various roles.
    These cover stories are meant to mask the offensive odor of political espionage being conducted by GOP-allied contractors who have been privatizing NSA and CIA operations during the past six years,which coincides with Gen. Hayden’s watch at NSA and the tenure of the Bush Administration.
    The outer layer of the onion is the lie repeated by Administration spokesmen to the public — essentially a denial that the NSA is spying on anyone other than al-Qaeda’s international communications. The second cover story is the one which is available through open sources to better-informed consumers, such as intelligence beat journalists, bloggers, and middle-level intelligence community personnel — that acknowledges the obvious fact that, as the Robb-Silberman Commission termed it, a “gross failure” of intelligence system occurred related to pre-Iraq war intelligence, and that certain, limited number of private contractors and officials (MZM and the Army’s National Ground Information Center)were the source of massive and pervasive “errors”.
    The middle cover story has some sex appeal, a scandal involving hookers and Congressmen and a corrupt defense-intel contractor, and the sudden resignation of the CIA’s Nos. 1 and 3. The gist of that middle cover story is best captured by an old inside pages story with a bland headline in The Washington Post, in this case by Walter Pincus, “Intelligence Center, Contractor MZM on Cozy Terms”; Sunday, July 17, 2005; Page A07; http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/07/16/AR2005071601018.html?nav=rss_nation, which portrays Gen. Hayden leading an emergency inter-agency investigation and repair effort. Finally, we come to the heart of the matter.
    The inescapable fact — and this is the “inner-secret” — is that Hayden has been in charge of the transformation of NSA from a government spy agency tasked with monitoring threats from foreign states that uses technology provided by the private sector into a publicly-funded, privately operated domestic spy conglomerate whose primary mission is to suck up every byte of electronic data produced by every U.S. citizen so that it can analyzed by private corporations using highly classified proprietary algorithms that nobody except their owners, who are virtually uniformly GOP supporters, understand and utilize. After all that has happened to NSA on his watch since 2000, we are now supposed to just simply trust him to be neutral and objective as he takes over and transforms the human intelligence side at CIA.
    No.
    There’s more. Please see, http://www.dailykos.com/story/2006/5/7/93933/90072
    – Mark

    Reply

  12. joe says:

    Steve — What is your take on H.R. 5020 (Intelligence & Intelligence-related Activities Authorization) which has language to EXPAND the powers of the security forces at CIA and NSA to make WARRANTLESS arrests? The CIA security force is answerable to the Dir. CIA and the NSA security force is answerable to Dir. NSA.
    The WARRANTLESS theme appears again. First WARRANTLESS spying on American citizen followed by WARRANTLESS arrest.
    The context of these powers for WARRANTLESS arrests is that the $1.2B TRAILBLAZER system to modernize NSA’s analysis to uncover key nuggets to protect the nation in the “war on terror”, is (after 6 years) NOT up an running. All this under Hayden’s watch and leadership. Bottom line, intelligence analysts at NSA have 1960’s technology to combat this “war on terror”.
    6 YEARS!!! and zilch. nothing but tons of papers and reports from Trailblazer. You gotta wonder how capable is this guy about doing right for American intelligence service.
    What is your take on this man’s management decision-making abilities? What does this say about his exercise of sound judgment?
    —- let me offer an analogy, bring this closer to home: This washington note blog contributes significantly to the level of discourse on a whole range of policy issues. Consider this “blog” a technology capability. Suppose or imagine a point in time that the New America Foundation did NOT have the appropriate technology for blogging. HOWEVER, NAF leadership starts a program to bring blog capability to NAF. CONSIDER…. after 6 years and $1.2B later, NAF still does NOT have blog.
    So…. for 6 years, Clemons ideas, insights, questioning etc circulates only to a small group. The American, for that matter, the world public remains ignorant of the issues, dynamics, insights, etc. that u put on the table for other to ponder, respond, etc.

    Reply

  13. Pissed Off American says:

    Oh my, Steve. Yes, this is just a brilliant countermove by an ex Iran/Contra player and our keyhole peepin’ General. Knights in shining armor, they are now moving to slay that mean old Pentagon dragon. Of course, while traveling afield, they are busy perusing our personal communications, ever vigilant for the Ohio housewife in possession of a suitcase nuke.

    Reply

  14. steambomb says:

    So why is the CIA so Beleagered? Because Bush and Company ignored them and are now using them as an excuse to get out of the failures caused by ignoring them. So they have to say it was broken otherwise people would ask “Well why didn’t you listen to them”.

    Reply

  15. quaid says:

    I think you posters forget that Negroponte is an American hero for having been responsible for killing so many damned commies on our doorstep that you all should be damned proud of a true blue American commie killer like that. We need killers like that on our side to defend the country; we don’t need a soft man for the job he’s to perform. He knows who the enemy is and sets out kill them. What more can you ask from our leaders in a time of War. Get your priorities straight, and hope when Negroponte’s through we won’t have anymore need for heroes like need ’cause evil will have been thoroughly defeated just like them commie bastards, yeah!

    Reply

  16. C-130s says:

    billjpa is on the right track. the disaffected in this country are about to be disappeared. they know where you live. those who escape will be driven underground or find their way to exile. say you want a revolution, they’re going to give you one, a once and for all final solution for leftists; has to be done.

    Reply

  17. Brendan Hynes says:

    The thing that puzzles me is the confirmation. Will Hayden get through it? I don’t think he will. But will the confirmation process actually happen? I think it goes without saying that NSA should and will be brought up in the hearings. And I don’t see how that could be good for the President.
    So, why nominate someone who would be forced to go through the very public process of explaining the NSA stuff? That’s the part I don’t quite understand.
    Hayden seems set up to fail, or embarass the President. Either through a confrontation in public over NSA, or being forced to withdraw him before the hearings even begin (ala Harriet Miers).
    So who suggested Hayden?

    Reply

  18. LJ says:

    Steve,
    For all that I have read and heard including your theory, is that there a real serious fight going on. And it will take a lot of sleuthing to find out where the fault lines lie and who is carrying water for whom. I think you have more work to do.

    Reply

  19. Ted Cormaney says:

    Steve: If all Hayden is going to do
    is play turf games with Rummy, he’ll lose. Who referees the turf games? Cheney!
    The best reason to oppose Hayden is that his
    experience is in electronic intell, “national means,” which is of very little use in Iraq or Afghanistan or any place where the US is likely to be on the ground.
    Rummy has been building up HumInt, which supports the guys on the line. Hayden can’t
    take that away because DoD does HumInt with
    Special Ops and they are in uniform and
    under discpline.
    Negroponte, then, is just aquiring what’s left
    of the CIA and getting control of their budget.
    Ted.

    Reply

  20. TSop says:

    Right On billjpa! Negroponte is Dracula and one of the sneakiest bastards that ever put on shoe leather.

    Reply

  21. billjpa says:

    It is Eye openning time Mr C! If you are serious with your posted position that the mad killer Negroponte is going to try and control rummy then you have lost me as a supporter and reader. Yup Mr C- that is how seriously wrong you are regarding negroponte. Here is a man (nah- he doesnt deserve that title)– nah, just a evil monstor- that has left a trail of death, murder, kidnapping and dissappearance throughtout Central America. He followed that achievement by the spending enough time in Iraq to establish and encourage the use of the same type of killing structure that proved so successful in CA!
    And now, lets put together this beast with the lying bastard that if the creator of the non-warrantless wiretaps of US Citizens!
    So lets see- hayden gathers the names and negroponte assigns the names to the secret killer squads— AND YOU SUPPORT THIS INSANITY?
    What a bloody shame!
    billjpa@aol.com

    Reply

  22. SW says:

    Negroponte, as a White Knight, for anyone who was conscious during the 80’s, is a sick joke.
    Those who have fallen for his line of shit this time around can only blame the crudity of the surrounding cast of characters.

    Reply

  23. vachon says:

    “But set aside the wiretap issue for the moment.”
    No.

    Reply

  24. MNPundit says:

    Exactly Dom M., he must resign before any serious consideration of him can begin but I doubt I can ever support him because of the constitionally-violating wire taps. I don’t know the whole story but if Hayden authorized wiretapping of American citizens making calls on American soil to other American citizens on American soil in violation on the law of the land, then he has betrayed the republic and must be broken for the good of the nation.

    Reply

  25. Dom M. says:

    I generally agree with you that Hayden has the experience to lead the CIA. My only concern is that Hayden is still an active duty 4-star general, so he not fall subject to the whims of Rumsfeld jurisdictions at the DoD?
    If Hayden is to be appointed, then he should resign his commission in the military, then head the CIA as a civilian official.

    Reply

  26. PoliticalCritic says:

    I think I liked the Harriet Miers choice better. This is more proof that Bush is worse than Nixon. Let’s nominate a man who destroys the Fourth Amendment and illegally spys on Americans.

    Reply

  27. Carroll says:

    P.S.
    I don’t know if Steve has seen this..just posted at 2:30pm over at TPM..it was via Laura Rozen via the NY Sun and I know nothing about how accurate the Sun may be….but if true it doesn’t sound good to me…could it be good in any way?….maybe he will update us on this..
    “The pending appointment of General Michael Hayden as director of the Central Intelligence Agency will pave the way for the agency’s emasculation and for the Pentagon to assume full authority over paramilitary operations.
    A senior intelligence community official yesterday said the director of national intelligence, John Negroponte, has indicated “he is willing to give up covert operations to the Pentagon.”
    The source also pointed out that the Pentagon has requested increased budget authority to prepare for the acquisition of the CIA’s targeted military operations. The intelligence overhaul of 2004 envisioned that they would remain under the purview of the CIA.’

    Reply

  28. David Gold says:

    Steve,
    If your thesis holds, than is the explanation for why the Republicans began criticizing the Hayden appointment ever the weekend is that they are Rumsfeld’s moles?
    Perhaps the looming “Hookergate” scandal is an important issue here. The Bush-Rove team may feel that they would rather have a CIA Director who does not know the 4th Amendment than one who is too close to people who visited the Watergate suite to play poker, etc. Republicans are increasingly fearing a Dem surge in November, especially in the House where Dem control of the Judiciary Committee is a major step on the road to impeachment. Mobilizing their base will be harder with a sex/money scandal within the Administration than with Goss in the rear view mirror.

    Reply

  29. Carroll says:

    Steve has an intriguing take on this.
    But I need someone to explain to me why Bush would want to lessen Rummy’s control in this manner. Bush has had no trouble in replacing other people so if Rummy didn’t suit his own agenda he would have replaced him long ago…
    ..Except…he thinks it would be admitting Iraq failure..and Negroponte and Hyden are a way of getting Rummy on the right track..or off the wrong track. Would Negroponte and Hyden have a different ideology..or is it just that they would be more competent in carrying out the same agenda? Beats me.
    I haven’t seen any signs that Bush has the grey matter to be a master plotter so this has to be the manuvering of some other powers behind the throne.
    Is Hyden in the mold of the more war averse military figure Powell, or is he another blood and guts type? I don’t know anything about Hyden.

    Reply

  30. Marica says:

    To Steve Clemons:
    Given Hayden’s and Negroponte’s past record of “service” it is difficult to understand the credence you grant them.
    Who is supporting Negroponte if he is pitted against Cheney-Rumsfeld? Is Bush even running on the track?
    Is it just the lesser of two evils or two hands in one glove?
    When will the gong of bankruptcy slow them down?

    Reply

  31. my too sense says:

    I dunno, now not being in your position of expertise in terms of knowledge of the main players here and purely from an naive outsider’s point of view, Negroponte in a power struggle with Rummy? ….that’s the choice the American public has here? The lesser of two horrible evils. I dunno, I have a serious problem with that…that’s like a choice between beelzebub and Satan. Plus I’m sorry I can’t just put aside the warrantless illegal spying angle here.
    Unrelated topic do you think the McCarthy firing had anything to do with Goss’ firin…errr resignation? Just wonderin…?

    Reply

  32. Marc says:

    More to support Steve’s thesis.
    A daunting task ahead for next CIA chief
    By Ehsan Ahrari
    Don’t expect that Porter Goss’s resignation on Friday as the head of the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) will bring about qualitative changes in the collection of intelligence or the resolution of another chronic problem, lack of coordination among various intelligence agencies. Personnel changes at that high level make for splashy news, but they seldom lead to substantive changes. Problems related to US intelligence agencies are about their long-term survival in an unsettled national-security environment.
    No official explanation for Goss’s resignation was issued, but there are several reasons for it. Some of them are related to bureaucratic infighting for which Washington is legendary. Another may have something to do with his personal style of running the agency. And there is even a whiff of scandal involving one of his subordinates, who is being investigated in a federal bribery case.
    The foremost reason for the departure of Goss is related to the confusing nature of the CIA’s current role and mission. The intelligence community in the United States has grown to 16 separate intelligence agencies, with 100,000 employees. The job of intelligence has become so huge, so complex, so massive and so interminable that not even this conglomeration of agencies ensures its continued success. Indeed, it can be argued that the involvement of so many agencies enhances the chances of failure.
    Goss was chosen to re-energize and, in the process, depoliticize the agency. However, he made more than his fair share of mistakes. A former congressman who had worked as a CIA spy in the 1960s, Goss did not have any experience managing large organizations. He brought with him many of his legislative assistants, and they did everything to alienate the intelligence professionals. Soon they started to leave the agency in large numbers.
    But Goss’s chief problem was that he became an obstacle in the way of the efforts of the director of national intelligence (DNI), John Negroponte, to make his office the center of power, not for personal reasons, but because that was a requirement of the post-September 11 era. His was a new position created as part of a number of recommendations made by a special committee investigating the September 11 attacks and the intelligence failure behind them.
    Negroponte, then US ambassador to Iraq, was chosen to be the first DNI, and as such he had the full support of the president and Congress. Goss did not know how to deal with those developments. He reportedly soon started butting heads with Negroponte on turf matters. Thus he became a marked man, whose departure was only a matter of time.
    Then there was that element of scandal in the making, which involved Kyle “Dusty” Foggo, whom Goss appointed as the CIA’s executive director and top budget chief, the agency’s third-ranking officer. Foggo is being investigated in relation to a major federal bribery case. Even though this issue is far from settled, the fact that Foggo was the personal selection of Goss also doomed his tenure at the helm of the CIA to be short.
    Goss was not a distinguished head of the CIA. As such, his tenure will soon be remembered only by the historians of that agency. It is important to note, however, that his departure dramatizes the fact that there remain serious problems related to America’s intelligence gathering, especially interagency squabbles. Such wrangling is not only debilitating, it also tends to create inertias that are harmful to America’s security.
    There is little doubt that with the departure of Goss, Negroponte has emerged at the center of power; however, his chief fight in the coming days is going to be with another bureaucratic infighter, who is even more seasoned than Goss could have ever imagined becoming. That is Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld.
    Since September 11, Rumsfeld has insisted that as the chief consumer of operational and tactical intelligence in its “global war on terrorism”, the Department of Defense should be proactively involved in gathering intelligence, instead of relying on other intelligence agencies to provide it.
    For the most part, Rumsfeld has won that turf fight. He even won the authority to keep US ambassadors out of the loop while sending clandestine teams aimed at collecting intelligence or undertaking operations in his assigned country. Considering the fact that the ambassador to any country is the personal representative of the president, the power of getting him out of the loop on such crucial operations was a major victory for Rumsfeld.
    As long as Rumsfeld stays in his job, Negroponte is not expected to make much headway in his attempt to win turf battles over intelligence gathering. When he leaves the office, the chances are that his successor will insist on using the same template of fighting and winning the turf wars. Such are the requirements of the post-September 11 era.
    Goss’s successor is likely to be General Michael Hayden, former director of the National Security Agency, and current deputy for Negroponte. However, because of the NSA’s highly controversial program of listening in on international telephone conversations of US citizens without a warrant, he may face confirmation difficulties in Congress.
    The Democrats would not only want to question him about it during his confirmation hearing, but would also attempt to draw the administration into offering more information on the controversial program than it already had provided before confirming him.
    Taking a strategic view of America’s intelligence-related problems, and getting away from personalities of incoming and outgoing major officials, there remain a number of problems that are not likely to be resolved with the departure of Porter Goss.
    First, restructuring has not solved the problems related to the continued presence of a number of intelligence agencies in the past, and it is not likely to do so now. Agencies, to ensure their continued existence, are resolute about protecting their turfs and refuse to give up what they regard as functions that are critical to their survival.
    Second, the problem of coordination is not likely to be resolved now or even in the near future, despite the appointment of a national intelligence “czar”. Third, increased organizational complexity is the chief enemy of unfettered coordination. That problem has only increased regarding intelligence-related organizations since September 11.
    Finally, the Defense Department’s demand for controlling its share of intelligence gathering is not likely to taken away even by the president. Requirements for fighting a “global war on terrorism” have placed the department in the front seat of all operational and tactical intelligence gathering for at least the remainder of this decade, if not longer. Any attempt to take away that authority is likely to have severe political repercussions in the event of another terrorist attack on the United States.
    Ehsan Ahrari is the CEO of Strategic Paradigms, an Alexandria, Virginia-based defense consultancy. He can be reached at eahrari@cox.net or stratparadigms@yahoo.com. His columns appear regularly in Asia Times Online. His website: http://www.ehsanahrari.com

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  33. TSop says:

    http://www.nysun.com/article/32294?access=746351
    According to this story by Eli Lake, the Pentagon to get covert operations and thusly…”The proposed change would give the Pentagon unfettered authority to plan and conduct these operations without consulting an intelligence bureaucracy (i.e. mattress mice) its civilian leaders (i.e. Rummy) have deemed hostile to the president’s war policy.”

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  34. skip says:

    A very high NSA source told me, “Hayden wanted another star and knew how to get it.” The idea is that MH will blow with the prevailing winds—and right now, Rumsfeld is in the doldrums.

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  35. CrashingThrough says:

    Steve Clemons, this is why I read this blog every day. You just get it even when I disagree with you.
    I havent seen any other MSM or blogiacs come at these issues the way you do. It’s one thing to write the news and another thing to translate and interpret the nuances for your readers and for the country.
    TWN is just a damned useful blog. Thanks for hammering away on this stuff.

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  36. Crass Westerner says:

    Interesting picture of Delirious Caesar George Bush and Herr Generalissmo Hayden. “We won’t back down…never have and never will!” Hmmm, okie-dokie. Damn straight. With the proper spin, lies, corrupt cronyism, a spineless Congress, and the U.S. can fight any damn proxy war on the planet. Granted, the American people must be spied on first however, what’s a little spying among patriotic Americans. If the U.S. nukes the ayatollahs in Iran, are the Brazilians next up for preemption. Brazil is in and there are nukes in the hemisphere that Bush hadn’t counted on.

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  37. daCascadian says:

    pt >”…isn’t it better than analysis and collection are separated and do not prejudice each other.”
    Your lack of inteligence is showing
    Analysis is best when as untainted as possible by politics (of any kind) & therefore as far away from political appointees as feasible
    The military can collect very well but they are not very good at low bias analysis
    The (Iraq) problem wasn`t analysis, it was the manufacturing of intelligence & corrupt analysis by Bush Handlers, Inc. to fit their already decided policy
    The professionals did their job correctly & now must be punished for that
    Ever hear of nested eggs ?
    Agendas w/in plots w/in larger agendas
    Welcome to the house of mirrors and smoke
    “Stop quoting the laws to us. We carry swords.” – Pompey

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  38. WilliamR says:

    If Bush chose Hayden at Negroponte’s request and Negroponte chose Hayden to try to control Rumsfeld, why can’t Negroponte go straight to the horse’s mouth (or elsewhere — so to speak) and ask Bush to control (or fire) Rumsfeld?

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  39. Kathleen says:

    My problem with Hayden is not so much that he is “military” but that he conceived of an illegal program and seems to think it is quite okay to break the law. This is mighty dangerous to a free society. Hayden also says that if his illegal program was in effect before 9/11 it would have been prevented. Hog wash.
    Former FBI Agent, Colleen Rowley was on the trail of one of the 9/11 highjackers in August of 2001 but one of her superiors in Wahington altered her sworn affidavit in such a way that her request for as subpoena was denied. As has been reported, including by John Dean in his book Worse Than Watergate, Bush, just after he mouthed his oath of office, sent a memo to the head of the FBI, ordering them to lighten up on Bin Laden, which explains to me why Rowley’s affidavit was changed.
    I think Hayden is being nominated for quite another reason, perhaps to insure that “intelligence” fits the policy. There was no failure of intelligence from the CIA. The only falure in intelligence is between Bush’s ears.

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  40. pt says:

    Steve,
    Thank you. This is exactly right. I am despairing at the moment at the inaccuracy and ignorance of responses to the nomination. Hayden is a fine officer, not at all a Rumsfeld (or Bush) groupie, and will help implement Negroponte’s reforms. The result will be less OSD influence, not more. One thing that has not been picked up on too much is that what Negroponte and Hayden want to do to the cia– strip it of analysis and make it into a premier intel collection agency– is the right step. After all, isn’t it better than analysis and collection are separated and do not prejudice each other.

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  41. claus says:

    Vhy do der retired Air Force general still strut around inn his Air Force uniform vhen he ist retired?

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  42. hogen mogen says:

    Confirming Hayden would be tacit approval of NSA spying on Americans. That’s the game being played by White House. Rejecting Hayden makes Dems soft on terror since Americans for the most part don’t think this spying thing is all that bad.
    Also, Air Force general heading CIA, maybe akin to Christian Fundy AF officers taking over CIA.
    Air Force = Fundies

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  43. cletus says:

    Steve:
    You’re looking kindly on Hayden becoming head of the CIA “despite the duplicity about the warrantless wiretaps.” What do you know that counterbalances such a menacing piece of baggage?
    Everything gets turned inside out when you’re talking about intelligence, but if the CIA is to be useful as anything more than a plainclothes arm of military intelligence, maybe somebody more independent of the military should be in charge.
    The fact is, he will be confirmed or rejected without us ever knowing what he has been doing or how well he has been doing it. Where does your confidence come from? What else do you know?

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  44. theblogplace says:

    There are some interesting stories circulating about the poker games that Goss played in at the Watergate.
    —————–
    theblogplace.net: http://www.theblogplace.net
    bloggerclub.org: http://www.bloggerclub.org
    —————–

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  45. TSop says:

    “…potentially constructive in constraining the Rumsfeld/Cheney cabal.”
    I would like to go along with this wishful thinking, Steve, but Negroponte and Hayden are part of the Rumsfeld/Cheney cabal. This is about Hayden bringing the Agency under wraps and further under DoD influence. Thereby keeping the “mattress mice” – as Rummy calls prying minds and eyes – out of it.

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