Michael Bloomberg as McCain’s VP?

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bloomberg face twn.jpg
Looking at the electoral map, John McCain has to break into the northeast liberal establishment to become competitive in November against either Barack Obama or Hillary Clinton.
I believe that the Vice Presidential running mate that will most turn out evangelicals and conservatives on behalf of McCain is Mike Huckabee — as I have suggested previously.
Florida Governor Charlie Crist is still flirting with McCain for the spot — but he won’t get it. Joe Lieberman is hopeful too, but he no longer pulls in the Northeast the way “someone else” might.
But some folks near McCain and others near Michael Bloomberg are floating (already) the idea of the New York Mayor joining the McCain ticket. I have no idea how sound this would be — but at first glance, it’s an interesting pairing.


The thinking on McCain’s staff is that even if a lot of evangelicals are uninspired by McCain and threaten to stay home, the “change” ticket of either Obama or the “back again” ticket of Hillary Clinton will animate the conservative base enough that the South remains largely impenetrable to the Dems.
McCain began running to the left tonight in his acceptance speech — and he may run to the left in his VP slot. . .and the most intriguing, surprising choice in those circumstances would be Michael Bloomberg.
Bloomberg could give McCain some much needed sizzle on the GOP ticket. Of course, Bloomberg would have to rejoin the Republican Party.
These are mostly rumors in pretty serious political circles — but still, something to chew on.
— Steve Clemons

Comments

29 comments on “Michael Bloomberg as McCain’s VP?

  1. Doodle says:

    Rich,
    Unfortuntealty Arnold Schwarzenegger is ineligible as VP as much as he is ineligible to run for President based on the 12th Amendment.

    Reply

  2. Jennifer says:

    Bloomberg would be an inspired choice for McCain’s veep. I’m a female, Massachusetts Independent who’s been supporting Hillary Clinton. If she is not the Democratic nominee, I will not vote for Obama and I’ll vote for McCain if he has a running mate with financial credibility. Bloomberg is the ticket! By the way, I’ve been very liberal for years but Obama will not get my vote because he is devious, inexperienced, and not worthy of the presidency.

    Reply

  3. karenk says:

    I have to agree with most of the posters here. If the conservative Republicans think McCain is too liberal, they will not be thrilled with Mike “I’m not a Republican anymore” Bloomberg. Bloomberg and McCain don’t even have the same political ideology.

    Reply

  4. Robert J N says:

    A lot of people are hearing Thune as his Veep. It will also secure the Dakotas against Obama.
    Also if McCain loses in 2008. Bobby Jindal will be their nominee, in ’12 or ’16. He is their biggest star.

    Reply

  5. bob h says:

    Surely the Bible thumpers in the Party will put the kibosh on a secular Jew.

    Reply

  6. EA says:

    How much does the Independents calculus matter?
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/30/AR2007063000597.html
    If McCain chooses a bible thumper to hold his conservatives line, doesn’t he risk losing the independents line? Does that matter?

    Reply

  7. carsick says:

    Steve,
    I don’t see it. I think it’s a behind the scenes way to get some media attention (fawning)now that the primaries are over. Next week we’ll be hearing about Hagel on the ticket (who would actually be a better fit philosophically but would also piss off the base).
    I remember you’ve said nice things about Rob Portman before. Thoughts on him?
    He’s got a lower profile but his conservative cred is legit and the press in DC like the guy plus he’s worked primarily on bi-partisan government efficiency and economic issues. He’s also very likable though he does appear on camera a bit like Wes Clark, someone too old to still look like a Boy Scout.

    Reply

  8. jvarisco says:

    The northeast? Why? Did Bush win any of the Northeast? In order to lose, McCain has to fail to carry the south and a few swing states he’s strong in (e.g. Florida). McCain needs to make sure conservatives vote for him, and he will win. Without them, he won’t. (Bill) Clinton won because he split southern conservatives, as did Carter. There’s no way a Democrat can win without doing that, and right now neither Obama nor Hillary seems capable of doing so.
    McCain needs to pick a strong conservative, someone like Romney or Thompson.

    Reply

  9. JP says:

    Bloomberg doesn’t help McCain with the GOP base. McCain is already in a pretty good position with independents — he can probably expand his vote support further in the middle, but he can do that on his on. There are larger gains to be made though simply by shoring up support on his right flank — this is where his focus needs to be right now.
    Choosing someone like Bloomberg would reinforce every concern that socially conservative Republicans have about McCain. I think a lot of these voters would feel like they were being purposely snubbed and ignored by the choice. They would stay home in large numbers in November.
    McCain’s best choice is a young Republican with some “street cred” amongst social conservatives. George Allen. John Thune. Just a couple names.

    Reply

  10. gil says:

    No way…Bloomberg is an independent…
    I wouldn’t be surprised to see the GOP wanting to make “history” by having a woman VP…
    but who?…

    Reply

  11. notgonnahappen says:

    really, steve, this is a ridiculous idea.
    with all due respect, sometimes you amaze me.

    Reply

  12. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “Wouldn’t all of that be a rebuke to what McCain stands for?”
    Well, that depends on what time of the day it is, and what McMuddles is “standing for” at that given moment.

    Reply

  13. evan read says:

    As a Republican, Bloomberg is extremely liberal. He’s really more of Democrat, who originally ran as a Republican so he could bypass the extremely competitive Democratic primary. He’s raised taxes, proposed congestion pricing in Manhattan, fought for gun control, and argued for aggressive action against global warming. Wouldn’t all of that be a rebuke to what McCain stands for?

    Reply

  14. Nigel says:

    The ultimate would of course be the Governator, but as he could not take over as President that is a no go.

    Reply

  15. Whit says:

    Bloomberg would get the economics portfolio – on which he’s arguably more knowledgeable than any other elected politician. That would totally drain away Clinton’s support from the corporate sector – on which she’s largely dependent for fund raising. And turn those funds over to McCain.

    Reply

  16. James says:

    That’s a moderate ticket I like…McCain-Bloomberg/Lieberman/Powell/Rice all havea ring to it.

    Reply

  17. Mr.Murder says:

    “Florida Governor Charlie Crist is still flirting with McCain…”
    We venture into the realm of irony and double entendre.
    My opinion has been that McCain will have to latch onto someone with the kind of capital that can pay to play, in light of McCain’s poor ability to clear paperwork for minimum legality thresholds due fund raising.
    Someone above said the same.
    Then, look at the big picture. Romney has the credentials to play out some fundie tunes, and has some support on the northeast and among the elites of business and finance.

    Reply

  18. Patience says:

    While pundits would swoon if McCain picked Bloomberg, I don’t know who else would be impressed. McCain’s got enough trouble with the evangelicals as it is without picking a pro-choice, pro-stem cell Northeastern mayor.

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  19. downtown says:

    I can’t envision Bloomberg playing second fiddle to anyone.

    Reply

  20. lugbolt says:

    Steve,
    Is this really a contest between the DLC, supporting corporate money, and the DNC, supporting grass roots?

    Reply

  21. Carroll says:

    From what I understand McWar is not raking in the amount of money the dems are…Bloomberg’s money would come in handy. Can Bloomberg throw in his own money if he is the VP on the ticket?

    Reply

  22. Jim says:

    The base is already suspicious of McCain, I doubt a social libertarian from Noo York City is gonna play real well with people whose most important issues are abortion and immigration.
    A McCain-Lieberman ticket is about the only thing that would open my checkbook to Clinton in the GE.

    Reply

  23. Bill R. says:

    Steve, where do you come up with these ideas?? McCain , the gunslinger who wants to bomb Iran and keep us in Iraq for 100 years, outlaw abortion, and pack the Supreme Court with fundamentalists. Not on your life and there would be an uproar from the fundies in the Republican party. Bloomberg is much more a VP for Obama than for McCain.

    Reply

  24. PissedOffAmerican says:

    I like the idea of a McCain/Huckabee ticket. That way we can slaughter Muslims with God’s blessing. Of course, we’ll have to work Leiberman in there somewhere, so we know which ragheads we should target on any given day. Maybe McCain can work Hagee in there somewhere too.
    Halleujah!! Dead Muslim’s everywhere! After all, Israel has to get something for our money.

    Reply

  25. rich says:

    I dunno.
    Would Bloomberg subordinate his reality-based policy & progressive outlook to McCain’s recidivist (bombombbombIran, might-makes-right, don’t-know-nuthin’-’bout-economy (sing it), no-one-here-but-one-maverick-and-49-lobbyists, staring-into-the-abyss) stance? Would he really do that? Even Bloomberg wouldn’t hitch his horse to that wagon.
    I was thinking Arnold Schwarzenegger. Sure, it takes California out of the happily Republican-governed column, but persuading the likes of Orrin Hatch (ever-eager to violate his nominally conservative principles to rip another hole in the Constitution) to do the heavy lifting should be no problem. The only hurdle is the time-frame required to eLIMinate that pesky native-born provision for Przdntl aspirants. And even were it possible, I’d bet Arnold’s too smart as well.
    Question: How much trouble will McCain have finding a heavyweight running mate? Huckabee makes sense, in that he adds the base–and the authenticity McCain lacks, despite the establishment’s desperate need to believe his patina hasn’t worn thin or disappeared altogether. Some yet believe, but that’s wishful thinking. Don’t think McCain coming to terms with Huckabee as VP would be easy or simple–though an all-disaffected Republican ticket would tell a story–were it seriously disaffected.
    Looking forward to the Obama-McCain debate, though that outcome’s not yet written. It’d be a classic–and would expose McCain, who’s gotten a free ride from the press for years.

    Reply

  26. Dirk says:

    Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Hee Hee Ha Ha Ha Hee Hee Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Hee Hee Ha Ha Ha Hee Hee Ha!!!
    Thanks for the laugh!!

    Reply

  27. shazbat says:

    A couple of old white guys promising four more years of Bush-style “governance.” Just what the GOP needs! I like the 1984-style “big brother” video image of Bloomberg in the background…

    Reply

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