Introducing Myself

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I’m honored that Steve has asked me to begin making regular contributions here at The Washington Note. Having worked with Steve on and off for about two years, I have developed a great deal of respect for him as a thinker, writer, convener, and all-purpose operative. And as a TWN reader, I’ve also gained a healthy respect for his boosters, critics, and fellow readers who take the time to comment on his posts. If my thoughts and reports can generate anywhere as much passion and debate, writing here will be well worth it.
Here is a bit of background on me. I have all sorts of things buzzing around my head right now relating to energy policy, the United Nations, long-term consequences of the Iraq debate, and politics, just to name a few. Stay tuned, and thanks in advance for the warm welcome.
— Scott Paul

Comments

18 comments on “Introducing Myself

  1. Carl Nyberg says:

    Robert Morrow, the organization adopted the name “Citizens For Global Solutions” after the 9/11 attacks.
    I did work for the organization under the name “Campaign for UN Reform” in 2001. The organization did not oppose invading Afghanistan; as far as I know no one in leadership positions ever expressed that opinion.
    In 2001 the organization was working to get the United States to pay UN dues, support the Int’l Criminal Court and create a small standing UN peacekeeping force.

    Reply

  2. Bill Kehoe says:

    Hi Scott. I’ve been a regular reader of TWN for as long as it’s existed (tip thanks to Josh Marshall). I’m excited to learn that you’re an energy and sustainability guy. This country needs 2 concurrently running Apollo-scale projects, one for energy efficiency and one for renewable energy. The Western Governor’s Association deserves credit for placing both of these issues at the forefront of their efforts but now it needs to go national. One of the things I appreciate most about Steve Clemons is his ability to look beyond party lines and this is one issue that will require scads of that and I hope that, with your contributions, energy and sustainability will take a greater percentage of the TWN blog space. Energy resource access has clearly been one of the key elements in formulating US foreign policy for the past 60 years so, in that sense, it’s right up Steve’s alley.

    Reply

  3. alec&you says:

    “The link to my bio is up on the post now. The Greeks would be proud.”
    Posted by Scott
    —————
    Whew! Glad you did THAT. For a minute I thought we’d never met. Well, not me really, but you got the others going …

    Reply

  4. alec&you says:

    “The link to my bio is up on the post now. The Greeks would be proud.”
    Posted by Scott
    —————
    Whew! Glad you did THAT. For a minute I thought we’d never met. Well, not me really, but you got the others going …

    Reply

  5. alec&you says:

    “The link to my bio is up on the post now. The Greeks would be proud.”
    Posted by Scott
    —————
    Whew! Glad you did THAT. For a minute I thought we’d never met. Well, not me really, but you got the others going …

    Reply

  6. alec&you says:

    “The link to my bio is up on the post now. The Greeks would be proud.”
    Posted by Scott
    —————
    Whew! Glad you did THAT. For a minute I thought we’d never met. Well, not me really, but you got the others going …

    Reply

  7. rich says:

    Welcome aboard.
    You know you’re in the kitchen b/c there’s so much heat.
    I’d been tempted–with the first comment–to demand ‘How MUCH is Steve paying you to say such nice things about him?’ & ‘so you admit he’s “an all-purpose operative!” ‘ But I don’t know if anyone would get the e-joke, what with irony dead several times over. So, instead, a question:
    Two Sundays in a row, NBC Channel 4 in NYC has run stories by Chuck Scarborough on energy efficiency & hybrid cars, touching on security issues.
    Thing is, they interviewed Frank Gaffney to do it. He said as long as America gets its oil from anti-American, trouble-making nations, our security will be at risk. (IIRC)
    George Orwell would choke on the irony. Gaffney got us into this mess–and is staunchly for military actions that provoke a backlash–and are intended to secure control over oil.
    My question: Why not interview Amory Lovins about the intersection of energy efficiency, national security, and economic vitality? Lovins (@ Rocky Mountain Institute) has been writing on these matters since the late 1970s.
    Why allow Gaffney to present himself as the antithesis of his operant policy?
    Since your portfolio includes energy policy, can you offer some insight into why Amory Lovins has not been sought out and his work widely discussed? And why Gaffney has any credibility in the media? Particularly since his statements were an inversion of his policies. Thanks.

    Reply

  8. Robert Morrow says:

    Was Citizens for Global Solutions the group that said the USA should not even have invaded Afghanistan to dismantle Al Queda and the Taliban. Or am I wrong on that score? Or was it just an official speaking for themselves?

    Reply

  9. Carroll says:

    Welcome.
    Look forward to your postings. Also your take on the human rights progress at the UN and the ICC-US problem would be interesting to many of us.

    Reply

  10. gq says:

    Welcome, Scott! I look forward to your thoughts on the post-Bush UN or anything else you decide to write about.

    Reply

  11. Pissed Off American says:

    “In addition, he also coordinates message development and strategy for high-profile campaigns.”
    So, in that capacity, how much of your time is spent researching what your client should say if he wants to tell us what you think we want to hear?

    Reply

  12. Carl Nyberg says:

    Scott, I congratulate you. And I can say I knew you before you became a bigshot.

    Reply

  13. JohnH says:

    Welcome aboard! I welcome anyone with experience analyzing energy security and foreign policy. I’ll be interested in any insights you might have on how our energy addiction is driving foreign policy. For more than sixty years, American Middle East policy has centered on oil. President Franklin D. Roosevelt declared in 1943 that “the defense of Saudi Arabia is vital to the defense of the United States.” Major presidential pronouncements, including the Truman, Eisenhower, and Carter doctrines all were promulgated explicitly to defend the Middle East and, by extension, its oil. Yet oil and energy security are nowhere to be found in the current public debates about policy toward Iraq and Iran. The Bush administration prefers to create plausible sounding reasons for war, but when they prove to be false, they are quite content with leaving us with no reason at all for having gone to war.
    Maybe you could shed some light on this mystery.

    Reply

  14. Yanal Yousef says:

    Having worked closely with Scott I can personally attest to his absolute quality and his thorough understanding of the global issues that are often discussed on this blog. I’m positive visitors of TWN will appreciate the creative nature in which he will approach the issues of the day.
    I look forward to reading your posts Scott.

    Reply

  15. Scott Paul says:

    The link to my bio is up on the post now. The Greeks would be proud.

    Reply

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