Guilty of Self-Indulgence

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david-corn-on-the-newshour-300x180.jpg
(Did not run into David Corn today; photo courtesy of the News Hour with Jim Lehrer)
The Weekly Standard‘s Michael Goldfarb dubbed my post about David Corn, policy, and my constantly running into him as perhaps one of the most self-absorbed blog posts he’s ever read. I’ve probably written some others over the past four and a half years that beat that one — but his point is probably on target, regrettably.
I was actually trying to be humorous — and as I’ve reported on this blog before, I’m lousy at jokes and not that good at humor. I am envious of my friend and former Newt Gingrich aide Robert George who blogs at Ragged Thots as he has real stand-up comedy skills. I just don’t.
But the real reason I wrote about the David Corn stuff was that I wanted to share some of the references about Ben Affleck and Gaza, as reported in the Washington Post — and wanted to use that Mary Ann Akers clip as a way to lead into a separate subject on John Kerry’s discussion with Ben Affleck about the US economy. Circular reasoning, I know — but that was what was going on in my head.
So, apologies to those who were ticked by the self-indulgence of that blog post… I thought at the time that there were more reasons for writing in the style that I did. . .but sometimes, one just belly-flops and does something over the top and silly.
The bigger point I was trying to make is that substantive policy discussions can occur at the most vapid-looking parties.
And by the way, I didn’t see David Corn today. 😉
— Steve Clemons

Comments

40 comments on “Guilty of Self-Indulgence

  1. John says:

    Jeez, condemned by a Goldberg ?! Yea, don’t quit your day job, but I got the joke. A little name-dropping and humor goes a long way. I often have to attend charity events for work. One local businessman and I kept showing up at the same parties time after time. We have a running joke about stalking each other and the other’s presence signals a good time to be had for all. Keep up the good work.

    Reply

  2. DonS says:

    I’m still waiting for the IRS to forgive my 2007 error; but I expect to be harassed for the next several years. And believe me I’m not in the $128K tax mistake neighborhood. Hell, that’s that’s almost 3 times my last years salary!
    So I’ll cut Daschle a break too. He can sure afford to pay his penalty a lot easier than I caqn.

    Reply

  3. WigWag says:

    I don’t think Steve Clemons is guilty of self-indulgence; the question for the day is whether he is guilty of hypocrisy.
    On January 16, 2008 at 7:33 am, Steve ran a post entitled “What the Right is Saying: Tim’s Taxes. The gist of the post was about the problems Geithner (who has since been confirmed) was having because he neglected to pay self-employment taxes for a three year period. When I commented that the whole thing seemed like much ado about nothing, Steve responded,
    “Thanks for the note WigWag — I don’t think that this is a non-story for many Americans which is why I posted it. I think many have felt the harsh hand of the IRS and want to make sure that we aren’t perpetuating double standards.”
    Now, of course, the shoe is on the other foot. The nominee having tax problems is Tom Daschle who Steve obviously thinks very highly of. And the source of Daschle’s tax problem is Leo Hindrey who Steve raves about and has suggested would make a great Secretary of Commerce.
    Apparently Hindrey provided Daschle with a free driver and limousine at no charge for a three year period starting in 2005 and concluding in 2007. The value of the service was over $255 thousand (in addition to the more than $2 million in consulting fees that Hindrey’s firm, InterMedia paid to Daschle). Early this month Daschle paid back taxes, interest and penalties to the “harsh-handed” IRS of over $128,000.
    Personally, I think Daschle can be forgiven for not realizing the free car and driver should, in fact, have been counted as taxable income (although it is less clear why Hindrey’s company didn’t issue Daschle an IRS 1099 for this service).
    It is true that under somewhat similar circumstances, New York Comptroller Alan Hevasi was forced to resign from office and was convicted of a misdemeanor. But Hevasi was in office at the time and Daschle was a private citizen.
    No one is perfect, the tax laws are complicated and none of this has anything to do with whether Daschle will do a good job running HHS (he will). Again I think this is all much ado about nothing.
    But the question to Steve Clemons is whether we are going to see a post on the Daschle/Hindrey tax matter and whether it reeks of the same double standard he thought it did as when Geithner and the World Bank were implicated?
    Just asking.
    And by the way, has anyone noticed that when women have tax problems (Kimba Wood, Zoe Baird, and Linda Chavez) their nominations are withdrawn, but when male nominees (Geithner, Daschle) have tax problems all is forgiven?
    Is that just a coincidence?

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  4. Tahoe Editor says:

    I bit my tongue on the last post, but now it’s time: David Corn is Mr. Snide D.C.

    Reply

  5. DonS says:

    On BBC coverage of Gaza, I’m not sure that they have a lot to brag about given the recent flap over denying charitable appeal for victims. Here is another link that purports to show BBC’s overall pro-Israeli bias.
    http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=9307
    As I’ve mentioned before, it hasa long been media practice to characterize Palestinian (well before Hamas ascension) action as agressive, and Israeli action as defensive. Just the way it has been for decades. If a timeline is involved, the Palestinian action is always denoted as occurring first, and the Israeli part as a reaction thereto. It doesn’t get more biased and prejudiced than that. No woder Americans are conditioned in a way of thinking about Isr/Pal.

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  6. CLD says:

    Geez, Steve, it’s your blog. Post what you like and how you like. Anyone who doesn’t like it can read elsewhere. Anyone who posts a blog post bickering about what you post is just jealous.
    Personally, I enjoyed your post on you bumping into David Corn and speaking wtih Ben Affleck.

    Reply

  7. alan says:

    Steve: this your blog. You engage us when we criticise you, which is more than I can say for John King and david Gregory. We have had discussions on important topics: and I hope you will continue with that. Michael Goldfarb: send him to Headmaster McCain with a note. He is overdue for a spanking.

    Reply

  8. Pacos_gal says:

    Steve, Goldfarb, really..ewwww.
    Might want to think about that one, you had a reason for what your wrote. He had a reason for what he wrote too. We know what yours is..what is his?

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  9. DavidT says:

    Steve,
    Thanks for the moment of self-reflection. Such efforts always make you (as well as others who note it) more human and more palatable to listen to. You yourself are a good listener so a little self-indulgence once in a while is your due.
    I would like to raise along related lines, however, something that Goldfarb may have been driving at. You have terrific connections in DC and clearly lots of friends. We here frequenting the comments section (at least many of us) would love to be in your shoes. However while having those connections no doubt helps you at your day job you might wish to reflect on instances in which your friendships / ties to certain people make you appear to compromise the principles you espouse here. The whole Maureen Dowd imbroglio in the comments section, as I read it, was about this. I think the reaction to that post got way out of hand and it was generous of you to share some of your extracurricular activities. But I don’t think its unfair to worry about the potential link between your positive postings and who you like personally (and the reverse as well).
    As California’s most quotable former politician once put it about politicians in dealing with lobbyists, “If you can’t drink their liquor, sleep with their women, and vote against them, you shouldn’t be in politics.” I think you might consider applying this rule to yourself as an opinion leader. You probably already do so but it bears repeating. I share this as a fan, intending to give you another perspective rather than to pound you over the head :).
    One other thing on this. Ben Afflick may have the insights on foreign policy of George Kennan. Nevertheless he gains entree into parties from his being a celebrity. I think one should be very careful trumpeting the insights of Mr. Afflect since it may be hard to separate one’s interest in them as celebrities and one’s appreciation of their views. And even if one doesn’t have that problem, its hard for one not to appear to have that problem when citing celebrity insights (unless one spends lots of time focusing on celebrity insights and separates the “wheat from the chaff.”). Finally, Afflect may know Ari Emanuel but I seriously doubt Rahm Emanuel relies on Ari’s clients for policy insights. But that may just be me :).
    Below is Jeffrey Goldberg’s not terribly flattering thoughts on Michael Goldfarb.
    I think Michael Goldfarb might be just a little bit crazy

    Reply

  10. Beth in VA says:

    Goldfarb’s jealous. And wrong about most things. We love your personal posts. Life’s too short, I love reading your honest accounts of your fabulous life!

    Reply

  11. Linda says:

    I also just read the following paragraphs from ABC’s “The Note” about a Super Bowl Party:
    It’s a working Super Bowl at the White House — Obama and Biden are both rooting for the Steelers, but really are rooting for some bipartisanship to break out.
    Jake Tapper: “A Democrat tells ABC News that invited guests at President Obama’s White House Super Bowl Party this Sunday include Rep. Mike Castle, R-Del., Sen. Bob Casey, D-Penn., Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., Rep. Artur Davis, D-Ala., and friends of the Obamas from Chicago.”
    “That means not only that both Democrats and Republicans will be drinking beer and popcorn at Casa Blanca, but both Steelers fans (Casey, President Obama) and those backing the Cards (Franks).”

    Reply

  12. Linda says:

    Steve,
    If self-indulgence produces such an interesting threads, please keep on indulging yourself and us!
    By the dictionary definition (Excessive indulgence of one’s own appetites and desires), as well as that of many here, lots of things wrong in this world are self-indulgent including the neocons who getting Saddam with no concern about the innocents who would be killed. That includes Goldfarb, Kristol,and even your friend Khalizad, and all the rest of them. Indeed Khalizad has a son of military age who is in grad or law school.
    About all I can say in defense of Israelis is that all their childen do serve in the military.
    It is refreshing to see anybody be so self-indulgent as to walk off a panel at a major conference, but it would have been a lot better had Powell resigned early in 2003.
    Honor also should be paid to all Hollywood figures like Affleck, Brangelina, etc. who use their celebrity to do good in the world. If anyone is in a position to be narcissistic and self-indulgent, they are. And from the Depression to WWII, HUAC, Vietnam, to today, they have always been there.
    BTW, I’d guess that most of us, long before the internet, engaged in social networking. Whether it is at professional conferences, trade shows, or the local bar, part of success is knowing what is going on, interacting with others from around the community, country and the world.
    And the best of that netowrking always takes place, not at the formal sessions, but at receptions, parties, lunch/dinner, or the bar.
    Steve usually speaks and presents common sense and decency. Perhaps we are entering a period where there will be more of that from public officials. Killing anybody’s innocent children is wrong and outrageous as is taking taxpayers’ bailout money to pay bonuses, buy corporate jets, etc.

    Reply

  13. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Its interesting seeing the Constitution bandied forth here as a topic for discussion.
    I see Holder has pretty much insinuated that he will not seek prosecutions against those that made the USA into a torture state. As well, Bush attorneys have instructed both Rove and Miers to refuse to honor Congressional subpoenas. Meanwhile, both Rice and Gonzales have been called perjurers by a Congessional committee, and they seem to have plenty of evidence to support the accusation, particularly as it applies to Rice’s testimony in regards to the Niger fantasy that these pieces of shit used to grease the ways to murder over one million Iraqi non-combatants.
    There really isn’t any point, if one is not a scumsucking Washington criminal, to deny that there is irrefutable evidence and proof that major crimes were committed by a myriad of Bush Administration official, up to and including this satanic ogre Cheney, and this bumbling inarticulate traitorous jackass George Bush.
    So, considering Obama’s tepid platitudes about “looking forward”, and Holder’s parallel insinuations that they do not intend to pursue prosecutions, we have one more Administration displaying a complete and utter contempt for the rule of law. It is quite obvious that the “Oath of Office” means absolutely NOTHING anymore, and our elected “leaders” feel they can manipulate, contort, and debase the rule of law on a political whim, with absolutely no respect or obligation to the Constitution, and the people it was designed to protect.
    If Obama does not immediately institute prosecutions for KNOWN CRIMES, we must conclude, less than a month into his tenure, he has already committed impeachable offenses, and has rendered himself as little more than a co-conspirator, an abettor, and a tin-pot dictator.
    The law is not a grab bag of political cookies. To see Obama using it as such soils and corrupts the very foundation of what this nation is supposed to be, and supposed to stand for. And Holder’s statements, thus far, seem to be the statements of just one more AG that serves the President, and not the law, no better than Gonzales, and equally as contemptuous to the people he is sworn to serve, and the law he is sworn to up-hold.
    This is the FOREMOST and most pressing crisis facing this nation. If we the people no longer have a representative government, and our leaders hold themselves above the law, all the rest is just horseshit. Foreign policy, the economy, the environment, all of it, just a heaping steaming pile of horseshit. With criminals at the helm, unaccountable to the people and the law, there is not one single issue or policy that will not be driven by a desire for personal enrichment and increased power.
    And if this is not the foremost topic of discussion at these obscene elitist egofests, than these fops are just exchanging empty blather and self-indulgent intellectual masturbation.

    Reply

  14. Cee says:

    Don,
    Erdogan better be careful. Wolfowitz might appeal to the military again.
    US REP. FRANK ACCUSES WOLFOWITZ OF UNDERMINING TURKISH DEMOCRACY
    US Representative Barney Frank yesterday called on US Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz to resign, accusing him of undermining Turkey’s democracy. Wolfowitz had stated on an May 6 interview with news channel CNN Turk that the Bush administration had been disappointed by Turkish military’s failure, in his view, to convince the nation’s Parliament to support the US during the Iraq war. “For a high-ranking American official to urge the undermining of democratic decision-making by military intervention is appalling in any case,” said Frank. “It is particularly disturbing in this instance …. One of the most encouraging examples we have seen to date in the effort to repudiate the notion that Muslim fundamentalism is incompatible with democratic government has been the election in Turkey of a regime that is both Islamist and committed to free elections and respect for basic political freedoms. For Mr. Wolfowitz to lament the fact that the Turkish military showed respect for democracy and did not seek to muscle an elected government is a startling betrayal of what ought to be an American effort to support this sort of development.” /Cumhuriyet/
    http://www.byegm.gov.tr/YAYINLARIMIZ/CHR/ING2003/05/03x05x20.HTM#%207

    Reply

  15. jimbo says:

    Goldfarb should have been recently laid off from Circuit City instead of writing at The Weekly Standard. Ignore him and ramble on.

    Reply

  16. Kathleen G says:

    Don S
    BBC had better coverage. What else is new? The Israeli view gets more time than the Palestinian view.
    We know MSNBC (Rachel, Keith, Schuster, Matthews will not) and the rest of the MSM will not touch this

    Reply

  17. DonS says:

    Just heard NPR news up date reporting that Erdogan was welcomed favorably back to Turkey, and noted that it plays well with Turkish elections 2 months away.
    Surprisingly, the report did not note, nor have I heard one MSM news report note that the Israeli invasion, which played well in Israel,is highly likely to have been timed and prosecuted in advance of the Israeli elections.
    Your objective US media at work!

    Reply

  18. Kathleen G says:

    Goldfarb’s successful attempt to distract is oh so obvious. It was also obvious to me what you were driving at. Affleck’s (an individual with power, fame and money) has been willing to put his own ass and career on the line while bringing attention to one of the more outrageous situations in the world. The continued occupation by Israel of Palestinian lands and the brutal and over the top response of Israel in the Gaza.
    Some of us remember what happened to Vanessa Redgrave when she brought up the Palestinians situation in Hollywood over 30 years ago. She was basically ousted from Hollywood.
    Honor Affleck for doing what he is doing and thank you Steve for bringing attention to it.
    David Corn also allowed strong discussions to take place on (I believe his original) blog 4 or so years ago, until it was viciously attacked and over run by those who do not want these discussions about the I/P conflict to take place

    Reply

  19. Cee says:

    Steve,
    Why care what loud, wrong and discredited Goldfarb says?
    He probably just jealous for feeling like a skunk at a garden party…if he’s even invited.
    http://www.rightweb.irc-online.org/profile/4788.html
    Michael Goldfarb is an editor at the Bill Kristol-founded Weekly Standard and served as a research associate for the largely defunct Project for the New American Century, a neoconservative letterhead group that spearheaded efforts to push for the invasion of Iraq after the 9/11 terrorist attacks.
    A communications director, spokesman, and frequent blogger for the 2008 presidential campaign of Sen. John McCain (R-AZ), Goldfarb was a vehement critic of then-Sen. Barack Obama, calling into question Obama’s personal connections and patriotism. During an October 2008 appearance on CNN, Goldfarb said, “The point is that Barack Obama has a long track record of being around anti-Semitic, anti-Israel, and anti-American rhetoric.”1 Asked to be specific, Goldfarb hurled the “antisemitic” label at Rashid Khalidi, a Columbia University professor who once held a fundraiser for Obama, but then refused to cite anyone else. Outcry quickly erupted over Goldfarb’s allegations.2 Blogger Andrew Sullivan wrote, “Asked to name one other anti-Semite other than his allegation about Rashid Khalidi, he can’t. He won’t. But he leaves it hanging, refusing to disown or retract the charge. This is pure McCarthyism. And it is the rotten core of McCain.”3

    Reply

  20. erichwwk says:

    Just read the Michael piece in the Weekly Standard. Here it is:
    Quote of the Day II
    From what I can confidently describe as the most self-absorbed blog post I’ve ever read, Steve Clemons writes about how fate keeps bringing him and David Corn together at the absolute swankiest parties in Washington:
    And then I saw this note in “The Sleuth” column of The Washington Post identifiying David Corn and myself as the “wonkiest of wonks” in Washington. This actually made me happy.
    And then the columnist, Mary Ann Akers, disclosed that we were talking to Ben Affleck for a really long time about a lot of stuff — the economy, Affleck’s new documentary on Nick Kristof, the Middle East, and the like. There were about 50 people standing around us, and Susan Eisenhower was in on the discussion too.
    I’m not going to comment on exactly what Affleck said — but I want to say that he impressed me with his passion and the level of detailed understanding that he had about the dilemmas we face in the Middle East. He has his views — and he’s not shy about broadcasting them, but he also listens to alternative takes. I think Ben Affleck can be an important voice on the need to approach many of the country’s foreign policy problems without the kind of biases we have had before.
    My take:
    While Steve knows I am not a fan of irrelevant cocktail gossip, if the above quote is indeed:
    “… the most self-absorbed blog post I’ve ever read”
    Michael must lead an extremely sheltered life.
    To learn that “Affleck’s agent is Ari Emanuel, the model for obnoxious Hollywood super agent Ari Gold in the hit HBO show “Entourage”
    is something I may be able put to good use.

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  21. DonS says:

    So Steve, when some no name who doesn’t know your blog and writing style, criticizes your “lifestyle”, you say, ‘tough buddy’, its my blog. But when some Michael Goldfarb who is, what, some RW “pundit” criticizes, you get all humbled. Screw him.
    Yea, now let’s get gback to Gaza and poor Shimon wringing his hands, with Ignatious backing him up. And how about the revelation of Israeli rabbis imploring thier soldiers to show no mercy. Crimes against humanity?
    http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1058758.html

    Reply

  22. erichwwk says:

    And Rich, I thank you for expressing so well the outrage and affront I felt.

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  23. erichwwk says:

    Dan, thanks for the video link to the Erdogan and Peres, and the unbelievable I was watching that live, and got so angry at David Ignatius and Peres that I turned it off. I did not hear until later that Ignatius actually DID cut him off, and Erdogan walked out. I urge all to see that clip for themselves.
    Also, much obliged for the other link entitled:
    Pro-Israel media: Bloggers join media war
    Some 1,000 new immigrants and foreign-language-speaking Jews volunteer to army of bloggers set up by Absorption Ministry and Foreign Ministry with the stated objective of flooding blogs with pro-Israel opinions
    I wonder how long it would have taken to learn that, w/o your help?

    Reply

  24. erichwwk says:

    It takes a BIG man to title a Blog “Guilty of Self-Indulgence”. It takes lesser men years to get there, and some never do. Hats off to Steve. I hope it strengths his willingness to speak his heart, rather than make him gun shy.
    “To err is human, to forgive divine”.

    Reply

  25. rich says:

    Dan Kervick @ 10:53PM –
    “Speaking of the discreet charms of the global ruling class, there was a pretty amazing scene today in Davos”
    So David Ignatius can shut down Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan, just at a critical juncture? Just when when the assembled dignitaries are about to hear a balancing perspective? For lunch?
    Shimon Peres gets the last word and 25 minutes to put a war-is-peace PR happy face on Israel’s militarism in Gaza, but David Ignatius feels lunch is more important than hearing a 4-minute response from the Turkish Prime Minister?
    Two errors here:
    Patronizing Prime Minister Erdogan was an affront not only to Turkey but to the audience, and to me.
    When ‘keeping to schedule’ outweighs the necessity for a discussion reach its natural and required conclusion, something’s very off. Apparently it’s ok for the Davos audience to hear one vain, surrealist exposition, but not glimpse the perspective provided by Erdogan’s corrective lens.
    Erdogan says he won’t be back to Davos because of Ignatius’ peremptory action. It’s easy to see how Israel could blow up their increasingly productive negotiations with Turkey when they initiated the bombing of Gaza — even to Peres, normalized relations are a problem, and peace is a threat.
    You could understand heavy-handed moderation where dozens of people are demanding to speak, and the hour is getting late, but these folks all went out of their way to be there. It’s the major chance to hear what each statesman has to say–unless that’s not the point–and to be heard. Presumably.

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  26. N says:

    Michael Goldfarb is a hack who jokes about
    torture, is obsessed with presidential power, and
    has no qualms about sending other people off to
    die for his hyperpartisan fantasies. It’s a major
    compliment to be insulted by him! (Think of when
    Sen. Leahy was told to “f*** off” by Dick Cheney.)
    Besides, blogging is inherently self-absorbed, and
    that post was hilarious. Just goes to show you
    that Goldfarb’s reading comprehension level isn’t
    too high.

    Reply

  27. John Bowlus says:

    Yes, nothing to apologize for. As Chevy Chase said, be the ball, Danny. I enjoy your insights, regardless of their form.
    John

    Reply

  28. TonyForesta says:

    Does that mean you won’t be using “your vast array of illustrious contacts to encourage the Obama administration to diversify his economic team and inculcate alternative voices outside the Wall Street insiders and fundamentalist economics cabals, and truly give voice to the voiceless in redressing the pain and suffering of the other 99% of Americans who are not superrich.”
    Say it ain’t so Steve.

    Reply

  29. Dan Kervick says:

    News of interest to readers and writers of blogs, including this one:
    http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/1,7340,L-3663679,00.html

    Reply

  30. Ben Rosengart says:

    When are you coming back to Berkeley, Steve? I’d say a lot has
    happened since the last coffee meeting here, but I’d risk getting
    laughed off the internet for understatement.

    Reply

  31. ... says:

    michael goldfarb.. no relation to alex by chance?
    if ever their was a publication given over to self indulgence and absorption it would be the weekly standard…goldfarb was online editor for them at one time… perhaps he knows something about editing, but from everything i ever read in the weekly standard, it looked like they never had any.. it was an ongoing right wing neocon blowfest… perhaps that was a result of his editing!!!!

    Reply

  32. Linda says:

    Don’t worry; tomorrow is another day with the chance to encounter Corn again–maybe on the Metro, the Mall, the Hill.
    Just when you least expect him, he will magically reappear just like the cherry blossoms–maybe soon if the ground hog doesn’t see his shadow on Monday.
    So stay alert, have the audacity to hope, and keep on blogging!

    Reply

  33. ShotoJamf says:

    I don’t know what was wrong with Goldfarb. It was obvious to me that the references to Corn were humorous. I didn’t see any sort of belly flop at all. And self-indulgent? Hardly.

    Reply

  34. Steven Clemons says:

    Don — good idea. We should have an exchange on that front. I
    will soon be organizing a meeting with Senator Russ Feingold and
    happen to make Constitutional issues the subject of that
    encounter. We’ll get a lot of that up on the blog for reaction. best,
    steve

    Reply

  35. Don Bacon says:

    Steve,
    No apology necessary. You did nothing wrong. You have ample reason to think highly of yourself, just as the rest of us do (think highly of ourselves). I say that as someone who rarely agrees with you, just as I am disagreeing now. 🙂
    Which has caused me right now to flash-back to one of my first encounters with you, on the old site, where you showed, I thought, a remarkable and uncommon understanding of the US Constitution. You might want to drag that tattered and abused document before us once again, some time. If you can tear yourself away from Ben and Jerry — er, David — that is.

    Reply

  36. Jeany says:

    Oh piffle, I enjoyed the post.
    I recall there was some buzz that Affleck was house shopping in
    VA horse country a few years ago, along with speculation that he
    was thinking of running for office. I would give him a listen after
    reading this.

    Reply

  37. Dan Kervick says:

    Speaking of the discreet charms of the global ruling class, there was a pretty amazing scene today in Davos, where the usual decorum was broken:
    http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1060036.html

    Reply

  38. carsick says:

    I’m terrible at jokes but hopefully still have a quick sense of humor and occasionally wit – though a dry one. I saw humor in your post and saw it as a way to envelope all the things you mentioned. I live in Ohio; don’t experience hanging out with stars or pundits; didn’t go to the inauguration or surrounding events of a new administration…I didn’t read that post as self indulgent.
    It’s hard enough for a guy comically challenged, being charged with being self indulgent should roll off your shoulders…it’s a blog for God’s sake! People come here for your ideas and observations, a little observational humor is part of that.

    Reply

  39. John fullerton says:

    That’s just blithering, pay no attention to it, you’re a great resource of insight, and with that dervish of a schedule I’m cuttin’ you some slack. Go, Steve. JF

    Reply

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