Guest Note: More On Site Dispatches from Iran

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_31883_mousavi.jpgThis is a guest note from an anonymous student in Iran.
sent June 16, 8:45 am EST
2 pm news shows nearly 10-15 minutes of damage from the “march without permit”…again, the “Tricky Dick” law and order theme…what’s interesting is that while the outrage of Mousavi voters is acknowledged, as well as the nightly violence, the message is this is outside of the confines of appropriate patriotic behavior…the theme is clearly that Mousavi is rational and reasonable but this action is attracting “lot i loot” (hooligans)
. . .parents are advised to keep their young kids from being “fooled” by trouble-makers, don’t let them go out…Dr. A is shown getting blessings from the Russian pres….no doubt the pending decision of the Guardian Council gives an excuse to allow peaceful marches to continue, there is a need to show that the system is working, it’s legitimate…Mousavi march was scheduled for 5 pm in Vali Asr (spread by word of mouth yesterday) was cancelled as pro-gov forces on the spot (proving what I’ve said about the organizational capacity of the A forces), announced at 2 pm for 4 pm in Vali Asr (conveniently an hour before the planned Mousavi gathering), Mousavi has now informed followers to NOT go…
Million Mousavi March — sent June 16, 6:00 am EST
Today, under slate skies and despite official warnings that the permit to march had been denied, against rumors that orders had been given to shoot to kill, they came. They came by the tens if not hundreds of thousands, marching east to west along the many kilometers of Enqelab Street to Azadi, or Freedom Square. “It would be dishonorable, na mardi, to not go,” a young couple explained. “We have to go.” Another man asks who is going, what is going on?
He is told that the “Mousavi-chiha” are marching starting at 4. He laughs, “Mousavi-chiha nadarim, hame ye Iran hastand!” We don’t have Mousavi supporters, it’s now all of Iran…
That they came to Azadi, a place where thirty years ago the Revolution pivoted towards victory was fitting, for as much as the election campaign had been about who best represented the revolutionary values of Iran, Islam, and the late Imam, the push and pull of the past few days between opposition and Ahmadinejad forces has been a struggle to lay claim to authenticity.
Authenticity that lies in the imagined and lived past, places, and practices of the Islamic Republic. It is as if whomever can get to the important places and rituals first and stay there, hang onto them, will win. So at night, beginning at 9 pm, we hear shouts of “Allah Akbar!” from the rooftops, just like in the fall and winter of 1978-1979. We have marches to sacred spots like Azadi and appeals by all sides to the memory of Khomeini…
In the crowd there are families, young and old. One cannot help but notice the large presence of women of all ages. The typical daily life of the capital is out here together, the homes, sidewalks and boulevards abandoned for this shared space. There is word that the crowd is millions strong; we know that it stretches eastwards to Imam Hussein Square. It is an incredible occasion — by comparison the state-organized 200,000 strong anniversary march that takes place every February starts from around Ferdowsi Square, several kilometers closer in to Azadi.
The mood in the crowd was positive, reminiscent of the joyous celebrations of the final week of the campaign. The chants are up-to-date, changed to reflect the new circumstances in Iran, the things that we did not know before Friday’s vote. “Hale ye noor e ro dide, rai e mano nadide?” A reference to the light of the hidden Imam that Ahmadinejad claimed to have seen, roughly translated to rhyme, “If he saw that light, why didn’t he see the vote we cast with all our might?!” And, “Ta in Ahmadi nejad hast, in ghaziye ijad hast!” Until this Ahmadi is here, this commotion will not disappear!
There are new signs as well. Written in English, “Where is My Vote?” (I can’t help myself, the idea for an Al Gore-Mir Hossein Mousavi buddy film pops into my mind, “Dude, Where is My Vote?”). Another: 2 x 2 = 24 million, a play on the bogus economic measures touted by Ahmadinejad during the debates, now updated to reflect the equally dubious election results.
The procession passes through an underpass and just as there is great pleasure in honking the car horn in tunnels these many people send up an enormous cheer, echoing off the walls. From dark to light the crowd emerges from the underpass and looks back to see what they have done. There is above them stretching across the tunnel a dissonant sight, a sign with the visage and message of the Supreme Leader. He watches over this protest in the manner of TJ Eckelberg…
The crowd knots and comes to an absolute standstill. They are pressed against each other, Cochella and Woodstock in one. Slowly, slowly the people move forward and see that the cause for the standstill is Mehdi Karrobi. Karrobi whose almost 400,000 votes was the most telling sign that something was seriously amiss with the vote count (he counted more registered activists and supports in his campaign machine alone). Karrobi, a former member of Imam Khomeini’s inner circle, who during the presidential race four years ago famously protested that “I was in first place during the vote count, took an afternoon nap, and when I woke up I was suddenly two places behind Ahmadinejad.”
The 72 year-old cleric stands atop a car surrounded by body guards, blessing the crows with blown kisses.
As I have noted before, what is remarkable about the Mousavi and opposition marches is the orderly disorder. These are not rallies or events in the manner that we are accustomed to in the United States. There are no official Mousavi volunteers guiding the crowd to the designated rallying points, college interns filled with coffee and day-old pizza. The movement is self-directed. Mousavi had asked his supporters to march but to march respectfully, to not give any excuse for violence. The crowd is abiding.
Along the nearly kilometer length of a basiji base, the cry goes up: Shoar nagoo! Don’t shout slogans! Hands are up held up instead. It is quiet. Here and there a voice, unable to restrain itself, begins to scream “Allah Akbar! Allah Akbar!” He is met instantly with hisses and whistles—saket! saket! quiet! quiet!—and the voice falls silent again.
How do we know where to go? When to go? SMS or texting is down, the internet is spotty and cell phones have become unreliable. Still, Tehran has always been a city where information gets passed around easily. For all of the complaints and anxiety that life has become too modern, that people are living alone in great apartment towers instead of with their families in homes, the citizens of this city find ways to know, to be in each other’s business.
Conversations come easily even amongst strangers, more so now than ever. Men weave through the crowd, telling us what’s next. “Come tomorrow to Vali Asr at 5! Tomorrow! Spread the word!”
Compare this to the Ahmadinejad rallies that we have seen. Yesterday, Mother’s Day in Iran (an appropriate day given Ahmadinejad’s persistent claim to be the “defender” of the vatan, or motherland) the Ahmadinejad groups held their own rally and show of force in Vali Asr Square in central Tehran. Their numbers are not few — the crowd filled the square and stretched south for at least a kilometer. But this action is more organized, mobilization by memo as one observer put it. Word goes out in the mosques, bonyads, and ministries that there is to be a gathering and they come, organized by section and arriving in chartered buses and vans. Unlike the Mousavi rallies, their Great Leader is present both in person and in stereo. Audio equipment is set up to so that we might hear his message and the speakers tell the crowd where to go afterwards. The atmosphere is no less festive, no less family-oriented than the opposition rallies. But the numbers are less and the movement less sustained. There is, perhaps, less to lose for this group, less sense of outrage and danger.
Back on Enqelab, the sun slips under the clouds and light begins to fall sideways across the crowds, hands turn golden in the last part of the day. Dasta bala! Dasta bala! Hands in the air! Hands in the air! All arms are up, spread into the familiar sign of victory. The crowd reaches the square but cannot enter, does not need to enter, this spot will do. On either side of a nearby underpass a call and response begins, arms and legs hang over the guardrail, bodies lean over the road that runs several meters below. From one side of the underpass: “Mir Hossein!” From the other: “Ya Hossein!” From one side: “Mir Hossein!” Now from the other: “Ya Hossein!” Cars and motorcycles raise the alarm, young men with green scarves over their faces ninja-style run and hop between the traffic. They urge the crowd and cars on, MC style.
Two large passenger buses emerge from under the tunnel and the drivers lay on their horns, making the crowd go wild, they love it. It is all noise. The cheer goes up, “Gofte boodim age taqalob bishe, Iran ghiamat mishe!” We told you that if they cheat, Iran will explode!
We leave the square and head north along Jenah Expressway towards Ariashahr or Sadiqia Square. It is only at this point that the enormity of what is happening becomes clear. In the diminishing light there and stretching towards the rising foothills that mark the upper reaches of Tehran one can only see person after another. Cars and buses that have made the mistake of turning into this crowd have been engulfed.
The story takes a bad turn; all does not end well. Seeing the camera around my neck, several people rush up to me, frantically urging me to go take pictures, shouting that they are killing us all! Behind a wall, in an alleyway set off from the road, a confrontation is taking place between one spike of the crowd and basiji forces, holed up in a base. There is the unsettling pop-pop-pop of gunfire, a plume of black smoke rises into the sky.
A crowd is gathering in the alley and men rush forward to throw rocks while others tell them to stop, stop, that’s what they want! A police officer, alone, rushes in to help, brought in by part of the crowd. Suddenly he is surrounded, confronted violently by angry protestors. A great confusion ensues as water bottles and rocks are hurled at the cop; 10-15 men form a perimeter around the officer to shield him their hands up begging the crowd to control themselves to let this man pass, he has come to help. During the worst moment, we see the terrified policeman pressed against a courtyard wall, his hat has been knocked off, he shouts that he is here to help. Finally, thankfully, the situation is controlled, the police officer joins in the chanting, and he is allowed to go into the alley to help…
The chant goes up, the same as was used during the 1979 Revolution: “He who kills my brother, will be killed by me!”
The wail of an ambulance. A boy, he could not have been older than 14, is rushed through the crowd, carried sideways at the head and the legs by three men. Foam is coming out of his mouth and his eyes. There is no way of knowing for sure but there are reports that 5 to 7 people have been shot, have been killed right here in this spot. I see a young man hold up his right hand, it is covered in blood…
They found a way to make it last. Everyone says that in a few days the protests will be stopped, what’s the point of going out, but when the moment comes everyone is here. To stop this now would take a tremendous display of violence and thus far, blessedly, that has not happened.
Still, at this point, the crowd remains uncertain…An apt if unimaginative metaphor would be a school of fish. Everyone moves in one direction, then suddenly shoulders drop and they run for their lives the opposite way. Riqdan! Riqdan! They’re attacking!!! The mass looks back and sees that there are already hands held up beckoning the crowd to stop, to come back, to be brave and not run.
Fear. It would be a unfair mismatch if fear were to disappear. Do not believe the lie that this is a story of middle-class, urbane Iran set against the great multitude of obdurate peasants, the supposedly authentic Iran. That is a myth, what Juan Cole has called the “North Tehran fallacy,” no different than the bogus notion that Middle America is the True America. Iran’s heart and voting population lies in its cities as much as in the countryside…It was in the cities that the 1979 Revolution took place, and the 6-8 million new voters that showed up at the booth to vote, many for the first and only time in their lives, did not emerge from Iran’s diminishing villages.
Tehran is fast becoming two. In the late afternoon and lasting until around dinner time it is a place of peaceful civic celebration, a disneyland of political action for the whole family to participate. At night, the mood shifts abruptly, and the capital becomes a battleground, a city in which fear stalks on motorbikes mounted in helmeted pairs…
It is like a dream. We wake up in the morning, our legs and voices sore, wondering if this is really happening, anxious for what will come next.
A Palace Coup — sent 3:13 am, 14 June 2009
It’s becoming increasingly clear that is now a palace coup, with Hashemi Rafsanjani the lynchpin as to what will happen next. He is the sole member of the original “yaran” of Khomeini, or original Khomeini’s original team, with power and influence. All eyes are on him now — the Guardian Council has to accept the election results and it remains to be seen what Hashemi will do. As for the streets, the mood is incredibly tense and immanently explosive. In Vali Asr square yesterday afternoon, under darkening skies, crowds had gathered as well as cops. It was as if each side knew that a fight had to occur but were uncertain when to start.
Cops made the first move by occasionally running into the crowd with batons swinging, telling them to leave the area. People would bolt then rush back, cat and mouse, cat and mouse. They weren’t just running away thought…I personally witnessed a cop fall to ground after he swung his baton. Immediately two young men jumped on top of him and began wailing on him, then ran away. Trash cans are being set on fire, folks are busting windows, chanting “death to the dictator.” The chants have not yet escalated beyond this point…the demand is that their vote be respected.
It is, however, a mistake to think that any restoration of the election results will occur. The battle is elsewhere now and while the obvious theft of the election has enraged and disappointed millions, the action now is to demonstrate that folks aren’t just going to take it. Clearly a bad strategy on the part of the leadership as they could have easily given another 10-20 years of energy to the system by sacrificing the current president …Legitimacy, much debated by social scientists, turns out to actually matter. It’s not just force that rules, though that appears to be the case right now in Iran. Short-term calculations (get rid of the old generation of leadership for a new breed of revolutionary) will prove to be disastrous. 9-year old sons, for pete’s sake, accompanied their fathers to vote, standing in line for hours. That disappointment will not be easily remedied…it will
never be healed.
The talk now is coup, of course, a palace coup in the style of a Fujimori. It is a remarkable turn of events but one thing is for certain, the many millions who showed up to vote, a great many for the first time ever, were not fooled. Their vote counted because it made the situation black and white. If they had not voted, then Dr. A would have won anyways…Now in no uncertain terms can it be said that Iranian politics has ambiguity or complexity. The movement towards a more bureaucratic-military style rule, in which legitimacy based on an ideology and some semblance of democratic practice, is done.
The 22 of Khordad, June 12, will be an important date in Iran, particularly because, as I’ve noted, this vote wasn’t just college students causing a ruckus. Grandmothers, fathers, daughters, and moms all showed up to stand for hours on end. They will not be just passive observers of what the “kids” are doing.
— Anonymous Student in Tehran

Comments

20 comments on “Guest Note: More On Site Dispatches from Iran

  1. Sand says:

    “…They are quite literally everywhere!…”
    Well it isn’t really a far stretched idea for them paranoid telecommunication obsessed Israeli’s to be operating in the Middle East… I mean duh!

    Reply

  2. Curious says:

    Astonishing the power the Israelis have.
    They are quite literally everywhere!

    Reply

  3. samuelburke says:

    http://www.counterpunch.org/roberts06162009.html
    The U.S. media’s demonization of Ahmadinejad itself demonstrates American ignorance. The President of Iran is not the ruler. He is not the commander-in-chief of the armed forces. He cannot set policies outside the boundaries set by Iran’s rulers, the ayatollahs who are not willing for the Iranian Revolution to be overturned by American money in some color-coded “revolution.”
    Iranians have a bitter experience with the United States government. Their first democratic election, after emerging from occupied and colonized status in the 1950s, was overturned by the U.S. government. The U.S. government installed in place of the elected candidate a dictator who tortured and murdered dissidents who thought Iran should be an independent country and not ruled by an American puppet.
    The U.S. “superpower” has never forgiven the Iranian Islamic ayatollahs for the Iranian Revolution in the late 1970s, which overthrew the U.S. puppet government and held hostage U.S. embassy personnel, regarded as “a den of spies,” while Iranian students pieced together shredded embassy documents that proved America’s complicity in the destruction of Iranian democracy.
    The government-controlled U.S. corporate media, a Ministry of Propaganda, has responded to the re-election of Ahmadinejad with non-stop reports of violent Iranians protests to a stolen election. A stolen election is presented as a fact, even thought there is no evidence for it whatsoever. The U.S. media’s response to the documented stolen elections during the George W. Bush/Karl Rove era was to ignore the evidence of real stolen elections.

    Reply

  4. samuelburke says:

    so irans election results appear to be consistent with the pre election poll surveys.
    http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/20090616_learning_to_live_with_the_devil_we_know/
    By Scott Ritter
    The Iranian people went to the polls last Friday to elect a president. Pre-election polling showed the incumbent, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, consistently holding a 2-to-1 advantage over his closest opponent, former Prime Minister Mir Hossein Mousavi. When the final election results were announced by the Iranian Ministry of Interior (the agency responsible for counting the votes and publishing the results), President Ahmadinejad was declared the winner, with 63 percent of the vote—about a 2-to-1 advantage. And yet, when the northern suburbs of Tehran, home to a large number of moderate reform-minded Iranians who are vehemently opposed to Ahmadinejad, erupted in violent protest, and Mousavi began to cry fraud, the Western media immediately jumped on the bandwagon, giving birth to the “instant history” of the 2009 Iranian presidential elections.
    Ahmadinejad’s electoral victory should have come as a surprise to no one.

    Reply

  5. samuelburke says:

    and now it is starting to look that the breadth of amadinejads victory is real and impressive.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/06/14/AR2009061401757_pf.html
    The Iranian People Speak
    By Ken Ballen and Patrick Doherty
    Monday, June 15, 2009
    The election results in Iran may reflect the will of the Iranian people. Many experts are claiming that the margin of victory of incumbent President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was the result of fraud or manipulation, but our nationwide public opinion survey of Iranians three weeks before the vote showed Ahmadinejad leading by a more than 2 to 1 margin — greater than his actual apparent margin of victory in Friday’s election.
    While Western news reports from Tehran in the days leading up to the voting portrayed an Iranian public enthusiastic about Ahmadinejad’s principal opponent, Mir Hossein Mousavi, our scientific sampling from across all 30 of Iran’s provinces showed Ahmadinejad well ahead.
    Independent and uncensored nationwide surveys of Iran are rare. Typically, preelection polls there are either conducted or monitored by the government and are notoriously untrustworthy. By contrast, the poll undertaken by our nonprofit organizations from May 11 to May 20 was the third in a series over the past two years. Conducted by telephone from a neighboring country, field work was carried out in Farsi by a polling company whose work in the region for ABC News and the BBC has received an Emmy award. Our polling was funded by the Rockefeller Brothers Fund.
    The breadth of Ahmadinejad’s support was apparent in our preelection survey. During the campaign, for instance, Mousavi emphasized his identity as an Azeri, the second-largest ethnic group in Iran after Persians, to woo Azeri voters. Our survey indicated, though, that Azeris favored Ahmadinejad by 2 to 1 over Mousavi.
    Much commentary has portrayed Iranian youth and the Internet as harbingers of change in this election. But our poll found that only a third of Iranians even have access to the Internet, while 18-to-24-year-olds comprised the strongest voting bloc for Ahmadinejad of all age groups.

    Reply

  6. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Who said anything about “jews”? Take your insinuations of anti-semitism and shove them. Its amazing how assholes like yourself always imply anti-semitism whenever criticism or accusation is leveled at Israel.
    Do I think Israel could be involved in inciting this crisis? You bet I do. And your slimey and shallow droolings about “anti-semitism” doesn’t change that one bit. All it really does is underscore what an asshole you are.

    Reply

  7. Curious says:

    Bill R, it is SHOCKING what power a few Israelis armed with laptops
    have over world events. I’m glad you made this comment and
    brought it to everyone’s attention. Amazing how easily duped
    those Iranians are! Israel really is the mouse that roared.

    Reply

  8. Bill R. says:

    @ POA
    Oh, yes, those nefarious Jews in Israel are causing the unrest in Iran, causing all those people to be unhappy about having an election stolen! They are the source of every ill in the universe!

    Reply

  9. Nadine Carroll says:

    seth, Lots of reporters from Iran have noted this past year how unhappy people are, how Ahmedinejad’s support was slipping even among his supporters among the urban poor.
    The regime basically gave the Iranian people one way to send a message: to vote for someone other than Ahmedinejad, even though none of the other candidates are what you could call a real reformer.
    What’s so hard about believing that the Iranian people took their one opportunity to send the regime a message? I’m hearing reports that Ahmedinejad actually came in third. I find these reports quite credible.
    Certainly, the results were bad enough to make the regime panic. They could have stolen the election in a semi-plausible fashion but they just nakedly announced obviously fake numbers: according to the Interior Ministry, Ahmedinejad got twice Moussavi’s vote across the board, in every province. Not credible.

    Reply

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  11. Tatang Sulaeman says:

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    Reply

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    Reply

  13. seth edenbaum says:

    html stripped. Here’s the link:
    http://southissouth.wordpress.com/2009/06/15/conversation-
    on-historic-losses-and-perceptions-of-those-losses/

    Reply

  14. seth edenbaum says:

    South is South:
    “What if you considered that Mousavi and the other two losing
    candidates were right? An extract of a Skype conversation
    (edited only to remove my own ‘yes’ and ‘ok’ and ‘exactly’ and ‘i
    cannot stand makhmalbaf’ asides) with Alireza Doostdar from
    Tehran, between 1:07 PM to 1:17 PM (GMT-3).
    i was thinking
    let’s say mousavi is right.
    let’s say, his vote really WAS 60-65 percent
    let’s pursue that line of thought
    karrubi is right too.he didn’t get 1 percent. he got 10 percent.
    yeah?
    and rezai didn’t get 2 percent. he got 5.
    so what we get is
    60/65+5+10
    = 75-80%
    which leaves ahmadinejad with a whopping 20-25% of the vote,
    if we assume there were 0 cancelled ballots.
    i mean, does anyone expect me to believe that ahmadinejad
    would get only that much? not even in tehran would that kind of
    pathetic showing be possible.
    i think the guy won. at most, if there’s a recount, they might
    figure that he was a little lower.
    but there’s a long way from 63% to 50%
    they’d have to show that there are 13% rigged votes going to
    ahmadinejad. that’s about 5 fucking million votes.
    and all that JUST to get mousavi to the second round.
    it’s fucking impossible that mousavi would’ve won in the first
    round. that’s what i think. and all this screaming and chest
    thumping isn’t gonna go anywhere at the end of the day.
    by the way, i was thinking today, if we take the interior ministry
    data seriously, it would show that this is the first time in history
    that tehran has voted in majority for a losing candidate. i think
    what we’re seeing is tehran refusing to accept that it’s been
    back-seated by the rural daro-dahatis.”

    Reply

  15. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Proof: Israeli Effort to Destabilize Iran Via Twitter
    Monday, June 15, 2009 19:52
    Posted in category PoliticsRight-wing Israeli interests are engaged in an all out Twitter attack with hopes of delegitimizing the Iranian election and causing political instability within Iran.
    Anyone using Twitter over the past few days knows that the topic of the Iranian election has been the most popular. Thousands of tweets and retweets alleging that the election was a fraud, calling for protests in Iran, and even urging followers hack various Iranian news websites (which they did successfully). The Twitter popularity caught the eye of various blogs such as Mashable and TechCrunch and even made its way to mainstream news media sites.
    Were these legitimate Iranian people or the works of a propaganda machine? I became curious and decided to investigate the origins of the information. In doing so, I narrowed it down to a handful of people who have accounted for 30,000 Iran related tweets in the past few days. Each of them had some striking similarities –
    1. They each created their twitter accounts on Saturday June 13th.
    2. Each had extremely high number of Tweets since creating their profiles.
    3. “IranElection” was each of their most popular keyword
    4. With some very small exceptions, each were posting in ENGLISH.
    5. Half of them had the exact same profile photo
    6. Each had thousands of followers, with only a few friends. Most of their friends were EACH OTHER.
    Why were these tweets in English? Why were all of these profiles OBSESSED with Iran? It became obvious that this was the work of a team of people with an interest in destabilizing Iran. The profiles are phonies and were created with the sole intention of destabilizing Iran and effecting public opinion as to the legitimacy of Iran’s election.
    continues….
    http://www.chartingstocks.net/2009/06/proof-israeli-effort-to-destabilize-iran-via-twitter/
    Would it be suprising? Of course not.

    Reply

  16. PissedOffAmerican says:

    The Iranian People Speak
    By Ken Ballen and Patrick Doherty
    Monday, June 15, 2009
    The election results in Iran may reflect the will of the Iranian people. Many experts are claiming that the margin of victory of incumbent President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was the result of fraud or manipulation, but our nationwide public opinion survey of Iranians three weeks before the vote showed Ahmadinejad leading by a more than 2 to 1 margin — greater than his actual apparent margin of victory in Friday’s election.
    While Western news reports from Tehran in the days leading up to the voting portrayed an Iranian public enthusiastic about Ahmadinejad’s principal opponent, Mir Hossein Mousavi, our scientific sampling from across all 30 of Iran’s provinces showed Ahmadinejad well ahead.
    continues….
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/06/14/AR2009061401757_pf.html
    Well, if there is one thing we can glom off these “dispatches”, its that the anonymous writer supports Mousavi. And thats about it. I wonder how the “dispatches” would describe events if an Ahmadinejad supporter was writing them. Quite differently, of course. We gain no knowledge by reading the accounts of such obviously biased contributers to the reporting.
    And of course, we cannot trust the Iranian media, and we can’t trust our own media. So where does that leave us? Sifting through a catalogue of known horseshit, applying common sense and logic to the effort of trying to discern snippets of truth.
    And common sense tells me that this thing dovetails too perfectly into the agenda of demonizing Iran and removing active diplomatic efforts from the table. This looks like a classic covert CIA operation of destabilization. It stinks to high heaven. And the rotten stench of a massive governmental propaganda program is overwhelming. Once again, we are being played for fools.

    Reply

  17. JohnH says:

    Bill R.–Of course the Green Wave was not putting its lives on the line for oil. They were putting their lives on the line for change. Moussavi is offering reform. In return for electing him, they’ll get a little bit of the reform they want. And Moussavi and Rafsanjani, the richest man in Iran, will get what they want–control of oil.
    You really think that a country’s leaders are beyond cynical manipulation of a country’s people for personal gain? Where were you during the Bush administration?

    Reply

  18. Bill R. says:

    @JohnH
    The millions of the Green Wave are marching and putting their lives and livelihoods on the line for oil?? What a shrunken and cynical line of reasoning! And not credible.

    Reply

  19. Homer says:

    Unlike Gore and Kerry, Mousavi should not concede.
    Unlike Americans in 2000 and 2004, years in which the soundness of the presidential elections were highly questionable by any standard (Rem: Diebold, Sect. Blackwell, etc), Iranians should never accept the result of this election until it has been thoroughly investigated.
    Please: Don’t stop. The world has had enough of extremists like Bush and Ahmadinejad.

    Reply

  20. JohnH says:

    Another guest note from someone who deals at the commanding heights of the Iranian economy. And guess what? The elite power struggle in Iran has little to do with democracy, and a lot to do with a certain “vital strategic interest” that TWN refuses to mention in the same breath with US foreign policy. Yep, its about control of oil!
    “Unlike in the West, where governments are owned and run by the banking and financial system, in Iran it’s the Oil Ministry that controls the purse strings and calls the shots. The Khamenei faction has gradually been taking over key positions in the ministry and its myriad state corporations…
    Having finally wrested control after years of struggle of the oil revenues from the Rafsanjani faction, the Khamenei’ites are in no mood to give it up.”
    http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Middle_East/KF17Ak01.html

    Reply

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