Goodbye Tim Russert

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russert twn.jpg
Tim Russert died today from a heart attack. He has been a giant in political news — and he resisted for the most part much of the corruption of journalist celebratization, though clearly he knew he was a celebrity. I’m very sad about this news.
I remember when I was just moving to Washington and was working for the Nixon Center, I helped organize a forum with Richard Nixon at what was called “Jackson Place” — a venue off of Lafayette Square in front of the White House that is often used to support the work and meetings of former presidents and as a place for side meetings held by Executive Office of the President staff. Russert came to the meeting and was working desperately to get Nixon on “Meet the Press.” Bill Clinton had just begun to consult with Nixon on what to do about an imploding Russia.
Russert never succeeded, but his efforts and my communications with him cemented a many years long acquaintanceship in which Russert regularly complemented the growth and impact of the New America Foundation and this blog, The Washington Note.
This leaves a huge hole in my view in our contemporary political journalism, which is so shoddy and unattractive in many corners.
— Steve Clemons

Comments

50 comments on “Goodbye Tim Russert

  1. Bette jacobs says:

    What was the name of the background music that was playing on the all day “Remembering Tim Russert?”

    Reply

  2. Carlia Blanchard says:

    My deepest smypathy to Tim Russert’s family. May God give you comfort during this difficult time.

    Reply

  3. samuel burke says:

    tim russert was a nice man from all that i ever saw of him but
    his reporting doesnt deserve such adulation…he was part of the
    bought and paid for “the best press goverment can buy” press.
    justin raimondo outdoes himself once again over at antiwar dot
    com.
    http://www.antiwar.com/justin/?articleid=13006
    okay, so russert was an enabler of the neocons, who allowed his
    vastly influential program to function as the war party’s
    sounding board, but then again, so many were duped that it
    seems vindictive to emphasize this point so soon after his tragic
    death. right?
    wrong. it wasn’t just his sycophancy in the presence of power
    that motivates my little exercise in russert revisionism – it’s
    what was clearly his vehement hostility to anyone who
    challenged the status quo in any way and sought to provide an
    antidote to the dick cheneys of this world. example number
    one: his disgraceful interview with (gop) presidential candidate
    ron paul, the texas congressman who made opposition to the
    war and our foreign policy of “preemptive” imperialism the
    linchpin of his remarkable campaign.

    Reply

  4. Nancy says:

    I think Tim Russert was a very warm and kind man outside of his work, but all of this stuff about him being the most hard-hitting “you’d better be ready” interogator stuff is quite lame.
    Let’s face it, Dick Cheney went on his show – – and boasted that it was a great way to get his lies out to the masses. That means it was FOX Lite.
    I used to get mad watching him back down to the people he was supposed to interogate.
    the only guy who has the balls to sit in that seat and (hopefully) really ask the tough questions is Keith Olbermann. But the MSNBC/corporate heads would never let him do it. Can’t hack off the White House.

    Reply

  5. Susan says:

    I think Russert was a funny-looking guy who was lousy at his job. But then, I feel that way about nearly all of the TV “journalists” in the USA. They suck.
    But boy, they sure helped get a lot of innocent people’s lives destroyed in Iraq and elsewhere, didn’t they? And they are totally oblivious to the evil that they have done.

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  6. leo says:

    I think the whole thing has gotten excessive, did I mention shameless self-promotion?

    Reply

  7. lea ann says:

    I AM SO SAD FOR TIM’S FAMILY. I AM NOT SURE WHY GOD
    TAKES THE GOOD ONES HOME SO EARLY. BUT I KNOW SO MUCH
    GOOD WILL COME FROM THIS IT WILL BE INTERESTING TO SEE.
    WATCHING LUKE TALK TODAY ON THE TODAY SHOW I CAN SEE
    WHAT A GREAT AND INTELLIGENT JOB TIM AND HIS WIFE DID
    FOR THEIR SON GROWING HIM UP.
    I WILL MISS TIM RUSSERT PERSONALLY BECAUSE I AM NOT VERY
    WISE WHEN IT COMES TO POLITICS AND HE ALWAYS HELPED ME
    TO UNDERSTAND THE WHOLE PICTURE. HE PUT THINGS IN REAL
    PEOPLE TERMS ON EITHER POLITICAL PARTIES ISSUES. I AM NOT
    SURE IF I KNEW HE WAS DEMOCRAT OR REPUBLICAN HE TRULY
    STAYED BIASED FOR THE PUBLIC UNLIKE MANY REPORTERS.
    I WILL MISS HIM AND HIS BIG TEDDY BEAR LIKENESS!
    I WISH I KNEW HIS FAMILY PERSONALLY! WHAT A GREAT FAMILY
    SINCERELY
    LEA ANN FROM TEXAS

    Reply

  8. leo says:

    Funereal DC-media navel gazing in the celebrity echo chamber continues unheeded on MSNBC this morning… with that special spice of earnestly evangelical/classist-Catholic Goodwill too!

    Reply

  9. TokyoTom says:

    I am impressed by the many here who can see how sick the press/suck up to power dynamics are. Thank God we have Greenwald, bloggers and guy like you who notice it and harp on it.
    POA says that Steve is not part of the problem, but I think I have to disagree. Steve is not trying to be a reporter – like Russert ought to have been – but an influencer and insider, which means he tries NOT to ruffle feathers, at least unnecessarily. As a result, I don’t think Steve is always alert to all of the sick dynamics of our existing power structure (and if alert, sometimes holds his tongue), which explains what seems to be a glaring failure on his part to reflect seriously on Russert’s role in our “shoddy and unattractive” MSM.
    I suspect that Steve uses the comment section here both to catch important issues that he has missed and to allow others to give voice to what he is himself unwilling to do so publicly.

    Reply

  10. Janet says:

    My deepest sympathy for Mr. Russet’s family. He was a good man and a hard worker and an excellent journalist. I am sad to see him leave this mortal coil so early – but I am sure God has a better plan for him.
    To those who have nothing but negative things to say.. I would suggest you do it elsewhere. This is a place to say good bye not air hurtful and mean sentiments.
    Rest in Peace Tim!
    4eqa8q

    Reply

  11. Schadenfreudian says:

    True, RIP. However, the sanctimonious blather from the clowns who wouldn’t recognize “disciplined journalism” if it hit them in their multi-million dollar houses in The Hamptons [said with the pseudo-effete accent of the privileged class].
    Russert’s game required no talent, no skill, no particular acumen: for a guy his fellow newswhores tout as “thorough” and “well-prepared,” then why did he require a staff of 100 or so researchers? Tim Russert was a sham, as is the entire scummy bunch of corporate mouthpieces who vomit out pabulum they patronizingly call “the news.”
    Russert succeeded because his true talent was in lining up powerful people…and then keeping them in line by tacit threat of inviting them to his show to do his hackneyed schtick of “gotcha!”:
    Here’s Russert’s process:
    1. Ask you researcher to find something contradictory to so-n-so’s current position on…say…the war in Iraq.
    2. Have them type it for you to put on a monitor
    3. Read it to your guest
    4. Watch them squirm
    5. Care not about the content of the response, just the fact that they either did, or didn’t acknowledge the contradiction.
    Yup, THAT’S “tough, fair and well-researched news” folks.
    Graveyards are littered with charlatans; you can recognize them because their headstones are bigger than anyone else’s.

    Reply

  12. Mr.Murder says:

    Except for the fact that before he was a ‘journalist’ he was in politics, that was right of Brokaw to say.
    Tom Brokaw, the man promoted over John Chancellor, for the senior news man’s having mentioned that a Hinckley was meeting one of GHWB’s sons on the day Reagan was shot.
    Yeah, Brokaw being Russert’s eulogist is fitting, indeed.

    Reply

  13. Tahoe Editor says:

    Brokaw just said on the MTP eulogy that had Russert gone into politics, he could have been president.
    Word Of The Day:
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hagiography

    Reply

  14. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “Sorry to say this, but Steve is part of the problem, not part of the solution”
    I heartily disagree.
    I think he plays the games he needs to play to keep all the doors open. And yes, he is undoubtedly tainted by it.
    But I believe in his motives, and believe he is seriously interested in being instrumental in improving the state of the union and getting us closer to being the bastion of freedom and human rights we purport ourselves to be.

    Reply

  15. Arun says:

    Sorry to say this, but Steve is part of the problem, not part of the solution.

    Reply

  16. PissedOffAmerican says:

    The interesting thing about this thread, and Steve’s eulogy for Russert, is that it is completely devoid of any examples of hard hitting journalistic responsibility on Russert’s part. Perhaps if we had a history of Russert displaying the kind of probing journalism one would expect from a responsible and patriotic member of our Fourth Estate, these fawning eulogies would seem far less obscene. But the truth is, we have seen the passing of a celebrity, rather than a newsman. To eulogize him as an active soldier of the Fourth Estate is just more propaganda from the propagandists.

    Reply

  17. Tony C. says:

    Yes, it’s unfortunate when someone dies so young. But the idea
    that Russert was some beacon of responsible journalism in these
    difficult times is a joke, and a bad one at that.
    Yes, relative to Fox News, Russert asked some “tough”
    questions, but the truth of the matter is that he allowed himself
    to be co-opted by those in power in much the same way as Judy
    Miller and so many others during this disgraceful period of
    American journalistic and political history.
    Glenn Greenwald, Sy Cohen, Nir Rosen, Robert Parry (and the
    like) are examples of exceptional journalists of our day. They
    dug deep and reported the truth when it counted the most, risks
    (and monetary rewards) be damned.
    Tim Russert, on the other hand, didn’t even approach those
    heights when the country was in such desperate need.
    Sorry, but the truth is often very harsh, and millions of lives
    have been lost in recent years in part because of the failure of
    mainstream American journalists to do their jobs properly. And
    falsely glorifying one such journalist – as “polite” as it may be
    under the circumstances – strikes me as little more than a
    continuation of the dishonesty which has facilitated the horrors
    brought on by the U.S. government during the past several
    years.

    Reply

  18. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Well, seeing as how we seem to have buried Russert, and this thread is obviously going to degenerate into yet one more pro or con Obama brawl, I might as well inject one more example of my “virulent anti-semitism” into the mix.
    Is it obvious to anyone else that “peace” is NOT the goal of the current Israeli leadership? And do we need to be “anti-semitic” to recognize that the United States tepid disapproval of continued expansion does not serve the interests of peace?
    Israelis plan another 1,300 new homes for Jerusalem colonists
    By The Daily Star and Agence France Presse (AFP)
    Saturday, June 14, 2008
    OCCUPIED JERUSALEM: Israel on Friday announced its second settlement project in Occupied East Jerusalem this month, enraging Palestinians just ahead of a US visit aimed at rescuing the stalemated peace process.
    Jerusalem’s Israeli municipality confirmed a report in the Haaretz newspaper that the green light had been given for 1,300 new homes for Jewish colonists in the occupied and illegally annexed east of the city.
    The houses will be built in Ramat Shlomo, where there are already 2,000 settler homes, Haaretz reported. The paper said the decision to proceed was taken Tuesday by the city’s urban planning commission which reports to the Interior Ministry.
    Haaretz called it one of the most ambitious expansion plans for settler homes in East Jerusalem, which was conquered by Israel in the 1967 war.
    Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat expressed outrage at the decision. “We firmly condemn this project, which reveals the Israeli government’s intention to destroy peace,” he told AFP. “The international community must make Israel stop its settlement activity if it wants to give peace negotiations a chance.”
    continues at…
    http://www.dailystar.com.lb/article.asp?edition_id=10&categ_id=2&article_id=93130
    (Now, lets see how long it takes our revisiting trolls to steer the debate into one about “jews”, so they can exercise their timeworn excuses and accusations about “anti-semitism”. Thereby diverting us from the topic of Israel’s criminal and genocidal treatment of the Palestinians, as well as the efforts of the United States Government to subsidize a modern day holocaust)

    Reply

  19. Mr.Murder says:

    Maybe he can stem the tide of rising water from the flood of Rezmr/Rezko corruption.
    Did any firms have to promise campaign contribution to give bids on sandbags?

    Reply

  20. rich says:

    For anyone who didn’t quite glom onto the implications, and couldn’t quite bring themselves to click on that last link I’ll spell it out for you:
    Barack Obama went to Quincy, Illinois to fill sandbags.
    http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2008/6/14/213149/670/890/536096
    Sure, I know what you’re thinking: a photo op. So you won’t mind taking a little challenge, then. Consider three things:
    Quincy, IL is downstream from the Cedar, Des Moines, and Wisconsin Rivers. All that water is headed for Quincy, Hannibal, and St. Louis. Barack Obama is sandbagging where it’ll actually do some good, not arriving too late after the damage is already done and getting underfoot. Seems to’ve mastered the concept of leading a moving target when you’re taking aim.
    Where exactly is everybody else?
    Finally, check out some of the faces in the slide show (not so much the vid) at the dailykos link. Might seem ordinary til you take a closer look.
    Now ask your cynical self if Sen. Obama should’ve been meeting with Doug Coe or Michael Chertoff instead, or perhaps Terry McAuliffe or
    David Broder. There’ll be time for that as well.

    Reply

  21. rich says:

    For all you cynics.
    Chicago Sun-Times has its eye on the ball.
    >>>
    Obama makes rare downstate Illinois visit to inspect flood zone and sandbag.
    UPDATE McCain on Midwest floods
    Since he’s been running for president, Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.), the presumptive Democratic nominee, has not spent much time in Illinois. On Saturday, Obama visits Quincy, Ill. to inspect Illinois flood damage and help load sandbags– realizing that dealing with the flood stricken Midwest is a national issue. How a president deals with these massive emergencies–and avoid another Katrina mess– will be part of the 2008 presidential conversation.
    ARLINGTON, VA — U.S. Senator John McCain today issued the following statement on the flooding in the Midwest:
    “Our thoughts and prayers go out to all those impacted by the flooding throughout the Midwest. Cindy and I would like to extend our sympathies to all those who have lost loved ones, and stand ready to help those in the Midwest to recover and rebuild.”
    http://blogs.suntimes.com/sweet/2008/06/obama_makes_rare_downstate_ill.html
    See also:
    http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2008/6/14/213149/670/890/536096

    Reply

  22. Carroll says:

    Well this 24/7 Russert has become obscene now.
    If I were Russert’s wife or son I would be furious at the pundits and networks using his death to fill up air time. With 911 like background music yet!
    Enough is enough.
    And Empty wheel is right.

    Reply

  23. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Yeah, Russert, rest in peace. Meanwhile, from the backpages…..
    http://www.tdn.com/articles/2008/06/02/area_news/doc4843969e9445a584192829.txt
    It seems we have removed 6,700 tons of SAND from Kuwait, and brought it over here to be sent, by rail, to a facility in Idaho.
    Why, you ask?
    Well, it seems it is contaminated with depleted uranium, from the 1991 gulf war.
    How long did that war last anyway? Hmmm. We’ve been in Iraq HOW MUCH LONGER? We’ve expended HOW MANY MORE TONS OF DU MUNITIONS IN IRAQ?
    So, Russert dies. And in true Russert tradition, the news articles today will be full of fluff, propaganda, posturing lying politicos, and whatever scandal they can dredge up that involves open flies or celebrity beaver shots.
    And unless you read an obscure West Coast daily, you’ll have no idea that DU dust is deadly enough to remove from the Kuwaiti dunes, but not so deadly that our soldiers, and the people of Iraq, can breathe mass amounts of it daily and not sustain physical damage.
    Agent Orange, Gulf War Syndrome, DU dust…move on people, nothing to see here.
    Hey, didja hear? Russert died.
    Ho hum.

    Reply

  24. alan says:

    Tehe late Mr Russert leaves behind family and friends who feel their loss keenly. A three/four hour program on his achievements and contribution to Washington politics and Washington journalism should have been enough to reflect his past.
    What is happening now is way beyond anything I have seen. The people at MSNBC have gone over the top and have become caricatures of themselves. What should be a dignified farewell has turned into a self-congratulatory exercise in which everyone wants to feed of the late gentleman. It is pathetic, it is seedy and it tells us more about these gasbags. They are steadily stripping the man of his dignity.

    Reply

  25. LInda says:

    POA,
    Totally agree with you, and really like you when you are less angry in your posts. No doubt Russert was a wonderful family man, friend, etc. and even pretty good on television. But I’m old enough to recall the old “Meet the Press” that was only a half-hour long and had Spivak and two other journalists asking questions, as if in a real press conference. The interviewee was pummeled and never let off the hook if he/she obfuscated or tried not to answer a question. I also recall how often when I watched Russert, he’d get to a point and be “nice” and back off while I’d be yelling at the TV the next question he should have asked.

    Reply

  26. ... says:

    DonS – thanks for posting that.. i read it last night at emptywheel and agree with the sentiments..
    poa – never too late to impeach, but need to find some politicians with some backbone.. they are almost completely nonexistent at the moment it seems…

    Reply

  27. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Its still not time to impeach these bastards and throw their murderous asses in prison?
    Where’d America go? It seems to have gone missing.

    Reply

  28. Don Bacon says:

    from a recent Boston Globe:
    TAUNTON – His hands shaking and his blue eyes full of tears, Keavin Duffy pulled his wallet out of his back pocket yesterday morning and took out a photograph of his infant granddaughter. Standing on his expansive front lawn, with a bevy of small family dogs running large circles around him, Duffy cupped the photograph in his hand.
    “This is my son’s daughter,” said Duffy, a veteran town firefighter, his voice trembling. “She lost her father.” He looked somberly off toward his winding dirt driveway, where his daughter, Shannon, had just pulled up. His older son, also named Keavin, stood next to him, gazing at the picture and appearing to hold back tears. Then, he walked into his house to wait for a US Army official to arrive and provide details about the event that claimed the life of his youngest son, Shane Duffy.
    Duffy, a 24-year-old Army sergeant, was killed in Iraq this week, just after returning to duty from a visit to his hometown. The news shocked Taunton. Duffy was the first soldier of this community to die in combat in the Iraq war.
    ————
    Goodbye Shane Duffy. May your dying have some meaning.

    Reply

  29. PissedOffAmerican says:

    DonS, I am sure, was being courteous in just posting the link, and not the commentary. But the commentary needs to be read, so this is for those jacvkasses out there that are too busy to follow the link…
    At the Risk of Being Churlish
    By: emptywheel Friday June 13, 2008 7:12 pm [digg]
    My father died when he was 56–he was way too young to die, but he had lived a full life. And unlike Tim Russert’s family, we had 8 months’ notice that he was going to die, so we had the opportunity to put our relationships in order and say goodbye in a meaningful way.
    My condolences go out to Russert’s family for this sudden and premature loss. I’m sorry.
    But as to the media’ coverage of his death, I agree with John Cole.
    MSNBC has been running nothing but a 5 hour (and presumably it will go until 11 pm or beyond) marathon of Russert remembrance. CNN has done their due diligence, and Fox news has spent at least the last half hour talking non-stop about him.
    But let’s get something straight- what I am watching right now on the cable news shows is indicative of the problem- no clearer demonstration of the fact that they consider themselves to be players and the insiders and, well, part of the village, is needed. This is precisely the problem. They have walked the corridors of power so long that they honestly think they are the story. It is creepy and sick and the reason politicians get away with all the crap they get away with these days.
    Tim Russert was a newsman. He was not the Pope. This is not the JFK assassination, or Reagan’s death, or the Space Shuttle Challenger explosion. A newsman died. We know you miss him, but please shut up and get back to work.
    Best as I remember, the only man or woman who died in Afghanistan or Iraq who got this kind of eulogy was Pat Tillman. Maybe. And we know that was based on a bunch of propagandistic bullshit spewed by the Pentagon (which doesn’t make Tillman’s sacrifice–or Tillman himself–any less honorable).
    With about five exceptions, all the men and women who have died in George Bush’s wars have died before they turned 58–many of them at half that age. Many of them have young children they never saw grow up. Many of them never lived the full life that Tim Russert lived–except insofar as they served this country.
    It seems that sacrifice–the men and women who died for this country–deserve at least this kind of tribute.
    End of Empty Wheel’s commentary.
    …..so, has anyone else been following the back page revelations of the spike in serious birth defects in and about Fallujah?
    A million dead. 5 million displaced to refugeee camps. A country razed, its environment contaminated with deadly DU dust. Four thousand dead American kids, hundreds of thousand more damaged physically or psychologically. People hung by their wrists, tortured, murdered, sodomized, in our name.
    There are above references to Russert enjoying God’s grace in heaven. Somehow, be there a God, I doubt it. Something tells me we’re all getting on a train bound for a totally different destination.

    Reply

  30. DonS says:

    Newsmen and women, part of the village, part of the problem.
    Because I couldn’t say it better:
    http://emptywheel.firedoglake.com/2008/06/13/at-the-risk-of-being-churlish/

    Reply

  31. Tahoe Editor says:

    I forgot! Brian saved the last 60 seconds for ETHEL KENNEDY — who had just deplaned at Reagan National Airport and set up a TV crew at the gate. What a fantastic performance.

    Reply

  32. Tahoe Editor says:

    On NBC Nightly News tonight, Brian Williams had to juggle the egos of Andrea Mitchell, Bob Woodward, Sally Quinn, David Gregory, Tom Brokaw, Al Hunt and Mike Barnicle — all from Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan. That he had to do that — and that they all pulled it off — is a testament to Russert’s legacy.

    Reply

  33. DaveCA says:

    My condolences to the Russert’s family. I’m sure he will set aside some time in heaven to watch the Bill’s games.

    Reply

  34. Lori in Phx says:

    Tim Russert was to political journalism what Ted Kennedy is to the senate. A giant. He will be greatly missed. I can’t imagine MTP without him.
    Prayers to his wife and son. Rest in peace Tim. You were a good man.

    Reply

  35. Zathras says:

    My condolences to Tim Russert’s family and many friends on his untimely passing.

    Reply

  36. digdug says:

    It’s sad when anyone dies, especially at such a young(ish) age. But honestly, Russert was no journalist. He was largely a mouthpiece for dissemination of insider talking points, and with barely concealed biases of his own.
    Here’s an interesting piece on Russert’s *lack* of journalistic ethics:
    http://journals.democraticunderground.com/Time%20for%20change/31
    I don’t like speaking ill of the dead. But I like less the sanctifying of unethical and undeserving people.

    Reply

  37. barrisj says:

    Am I the only commenter who ever remembered and watched the original MTP, hosted by the ever-irascible Lawrence Spivak? He and his panelists were indeed from the “golden age” of TV political journalism, and would put to shame the sort of pap that passes for “incisive” reporting that of which Tim Russert was so paradigmatic. The old MTP really had an adversative relationship – albeit polite and correct – with its high-profile guests, compelling people to defend with clarity and probity their position on key issues. Not the sort of windy wank one finds on the Sunday a.m. spielfeists today.

    Reply

  38. Tahoe Editor says:

    Barbara Wawa: “I’m stuttering at what this is going to mean for this country.”
    Oh lord.

    Reply

  39. Tahoe Editor says:

    Pat Buchanan: “He was as good and tough a questioner as we’ve got in this business.”
    Now THAT’s reason to be depressed.

    Reply

  40. Kathleen says:

    What was Scotty going to say at the House Judiciary hearings about the Plame leak? Didn’t Russert testify to Fitz a different versionof events than the Roverator’s?
    Hope he didn’t go to the same hospital as Martha Mitchell and William Casey.

    Reply

  41. Tahoe Editor says:

    Chuck Todd, Andrea Mitchell and Keith Obullman are all a mess.
    The one who really needs the sympathy is his dad.

    Reply

  42. barrisj says:

    “…the gold standard of political journalism…”. With all respect, I think the Scooter Libby trial put all of this treacly effusiveness in Russert’s obit into a much-needed perspective, which few if any people bother to assume.

    Reply

  43. weldon berger says:

    This would be the same Tim Russert regarded by Cheney’s office as the best vehicle for getting Valerie Plame/Joe Wilson spin into circulation, right? Condolences and all, but Russert was very much a part of the problem with journalism, not an antidote to it.

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  44. Tahoe Editor says:

    The glowing praise phase is officially over. 61 minutes.

    Reply

  45. Mr.Murder says:

    How many millions of Iraqis died or have been made refugees since you helped embellish AWOL’s illegal war? It never shook your ‘off the record’ joviality at Kennbunkport.
    Karma got you before Den Haag could.

    Reply

  46. in need of a 6-week vacation says:

    Sad news. Another casualty of the unhealthy Washington lifestyle of ravenous pursuit of new deadlines and inadequate sleep. Best wishes to the Russert family and his friends at NBC.
    “We continue to recognize the greater ability of some to earn more than others.
    But we do assert that the ambition of the individual to obtain for him and his a
    proper security, a reasonable leisure, and a decent living throughout life, is
    an ambition to be preferred to the appetite for great wealth and great power.” – FDR

    Reply

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