Washington’s Snow: Oakley & Annie Out on a Romp

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PuppyWrap.jpg
Annie posing as a “puppy wrap”
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On a good ziggy romp. . .
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Over the hill and through the woods and under the log. . .
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The Dynamic Duo in action — DC bad guys watch out!
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Hey — Oakley. . .Annie. . . .Wait for me!!
— Steve Clemons

Comments

36 comments on “Washington’s Snow: Oakley & Annie Out on a Romp

  1. Robert Squires says:

    Jim, you need to get the book “I Never Felt Poor Except in Town, ” by Jean(Renshaw) Carroll. She and her family lived at the Selway Lodge from 1932-1948. I also spent time at the Seway Lodge in the early 1950’s when my Uncle, Ralph Logan, was the packer there.

    Reply

  2. Architects India says:

    I designed the Ruby Hall Clinic in Pune, India. One of the most admired structures in the ever so growing commercial/educational hub of the country.

    Reply

  3. Architects India says:

    I designed the Ruby Hall Clinic in Pune, India. One of the most admired structures in the ever so growing commercial/educational hub of the country.

    Reply

  4. James Curts says:

    The location was across the South Fork of the
    Clearwater and not the Selway. My bad.
    “I had a concrete plant in Kamiah, ID and moved it to Golden when the USFS contracted out the Bridge across the Selway at Rainy Day Creek.”
    Thank you
    Jim Curts
    jcurts@yahoo.com

    Reply

  5. James Curts says:

    RE: Selway Lodge
    I read with interest that someone had actually lived there. I flew into Selway Lodge with a guy in early 60’s or so and do not recall much about it. However, I flew out of Benton field in Redding CA for some time during the 60’s and the lady that owned/managed (not sure) was named Barbara and had been an owner/part owner of the Selway Lodge prior to early 60’s. Anything about the area is of interest to me as I have spent quite a bit of time in the general area.
    I had a concrete plant in Kamiah, ID and moved it to Golden when the USFS contracted out the Bridge across the Selway at Rainy Day Creek. After the bridge was completed we moved on and built a new lodge at Orogrand up Crooked River after the old one burned down.
    Was involved in building the fire station in Elk City with financing by Gwen Shearer owner of Shearer Lumber Co.
    I packed elk hunters in the Selway area East of Meadow Creek and off of Indian Hill look out for three seasons in the early 70’s.
    In 64 I took an Iowa corn farmer for a back pack trip from Hamilton MT over Blodget Mtn and came out down past Big Sand Lake, Elk Summit RS, Elbow Bend and finall on down Moose Creek to Moose Creek Ranch. Arrived July 3rd in time to meet the Christianson packers moving in for the season. That was a very nice layout and of course the USFS in all their wisdom soon after bought it and burned it to the ground.
    Anyway, we had a fine dinner of fried chicken, a good shower and great bed for first time in 30 days. flew out with Larry Dutcher the next morning to Kooskia, ID.
    So if there is any conversation or references to other info available re the Selway Lodge I am wide open to it.
    Thank you
    Jim Curts
    jcurts@yahoo.com

    Reply

  6. Pissed Off American says:

    “I have had stray dogs and cats since I was young: some of them were *pure bred* but none were bought — so I am very sorry to say that no matter how cute Steve’s dogs are, and they are, it’s indicative of a non-empathetic personality type when someone BUYS a *pure bred* when there are so many animals out there literally dying for love.”
    Posted by FormerJourno
    Hmm, so what do you suggest? Euthanize the pure breds so you can adopt a stray?
    Wise up.
    You ever tried to work cattle with a Boxer/Poodle mix?

    Reply

  7. amy says:

    Former Journo-
    Yes I have been to shelters. I have been in animal rescue your over 15 years. Taken my time and money to help save and find homes for hundreds of cats and dogs that I have raised from days old. You want to talk about heartless – try the asses who by animals and don’t spay or neuter them. I am one of the people who gets stuck cleaning up their mess. And I hate to tell you – its the owners of the strays who tend to not take care of their animals. Pure breds are just as deserving of someones loves as strays. You just happened to make one of the stupider remarks of the world. Hubris is a good word to describe your moral stance, and not in a good way.
    I have several stray cats that I have kept over the years that are not adoptable due to health problems, and a wonderful Golden Retriever that I (shudder) bought. All of which I wouldn’t trade for the world. So I just I am just as heartless as the rest.
    Also, the type that leads to invading other countries. Do you sit on your roof at night waiting for a space ship to drop Elvis off for a chat?
    Former Journo is your name, hate to think how objective your articles were.

    Reply

  8. FormerJourno says:

    Been to a shelter lately? I would guess not — can’t face your own guilt? It’s heart wrenching, that is for those who have hearts.
    I CHOOSE to go to a shelter, for the same reason that I am against invading and occupying other countries — I believe in saving lives, not destroying them because they’re not up to some people’s standards of *excellence.* Like Michael Ledeen’s *standards* of who deserves to live: Muslims don’t make the Ledeen cut, as evidenced by his role in the Iraq invasion and the Danish cartoons.
    BTW: There is no *Cross* here: we’re getting two shelter dogs this weekend, and they are ADORABLE. We gave a lot of thought to this decision and spent time with the dogs to determine that our personalities were compatible. I will guess (and will let you know) that they are at least as wonderful as Steve’s dogs.
    I have had mutts and pure breds, all rescues, but we never deliberately chose a purebred, they were all dumped on us. The mutts have fewer health problems as any vet can tell you. Pure breds are kind of like the royal families of Europe, inbreed and high-strung. But I have no problems with pure breds, I had a Lab and a white German Shepard who were gems. I have a problem with people who use dogs as a status symbol.
    Choosing to adopt a dog should not be like a competition to get the latest Ferrari, but often it is for those whose ultimate goal is status. In a perfect world it would be a question of making decisions based on one’s core values and basically how much love and care you can give others. My core values are that I would rather save a funny looking dog from being euthanized than have a dog that obviously cost thousands of dollars to show-up the neighbors.
    And I have found that people who take in rescue dogs are on the whole much nicer than AKC types. I have no doubt that Steve loves his dogs, I just know that there are so many less fortunate dogs out there who need the same kind of devotion.
    BTW: the new trend is designer mutts — GO FIGURE…

    Reply

  9. Amy says:

    Former Journo-
    That was one of the most pathetic post I have ever seen.
    Get off the cross we need the wood.

    Reply

  10. Ben Rosengart says:

    Steve,
    The light meter in your camera is looking to get most of the scene to a middle tone, between bright and dark.
    Snow is, of course, bright. So the camera lets in less light, to get to that middle.
    Your photos are underexposed. The solution is to dial in a stop or so of “exposure compensation”. This is a technical term, and you should be able to look it up in your camera manual, if you’re interested.
    Automatic metering is good — I use it all the time — but sometimes you know something the meter doesn’t (“this is a snowy scene and should be bright”), and a little bit of manual override is very helpful.
    Adorable puppies, and exposure aside, I like the pictures.

    Reply

  11. FormerJourno says:

    We’re trying to find a shelter dog to adopt from our local pound and it is an extremely sad experience, because we know that almost every dog we don’t adopt will die.
    I have had stray dogs and cats since I was young: some of them were *pure bred* but none were bought — so I am very sorry to say that no matter how cute Steve’s dogs are, and they are, it’s indicative of a non-empathetic personality type when someone BUYS a *pure bred* when there are so many animals out there literally dying for love.

    Reply

  12. Kurzleg says:

    Steve –
    Great pics! Does Oakley or Annie actually chew on that “bone”? We have the same one, and our malamutes don’t. They do, however, love romping in the snow just like O & A. Every morning the first thing (even before going potty) our younger one does is run out in the back yard and roll in the snow. Quite a thing to behold when it’s -10 outside.

    Reply

  13. Brendan Mackie says:

    Hey – I just saw this online (http://www.gadgetshop.com/pws/ProductDetails.ice?ProductID=1175) it’s this machine that blows chicken flavored bubbles. Supposedly dogs go nuts over it, absolutely nuts. Winter in D.C. looks beautiful!
    Your friend in Iowa,

    Reply

  14. earl says:

    Steve, you are a wise man to enjoy those dogs. They are the perfect antidote to that cesspool of filth and ego we know as the ‘human’ race.
    You do great dog, dawg!!

    Reply

  15. Marcia says:

    These photos are so refreshing, even more so compared to the last one of Andrea Mitchel whose picture left me stunned. No expression, no sign of life, no sign of the past. Quite symbolic of the eternal present in which the world is becoming confined. Everything is wiped off and away.
    Long live Annie and Oakley!

    Reply

  16. Arun says:

    About the best thing today on my usual round of blogs. Thank you!

    Reply

  17. Devil's Advocate says:

    Annie is too cute for words and Oakley is a beauty. It is so nice to see them romp in the snow. It soothes the mind.

    Reply

  18. Pissed Off American says:

    Thanks to both of you.
    One f, eh? Who says you can’t teach an old dog new tricks?

    Reply

  19. K says:

    POA,
    Your comments, whether I agree or not, are always thought provoking and strongly expressed. I enjoy reading them.

    Reply

  20. ET says:

    “…I too once posted as to the wonderful effect that animals had in providing richness and peace to my existence…” POA
    I loved that post and I love you. In my book, you can talk about the things you love and the things that tick you off any ole time you want.
    BTW, your spelling is gettin’ good. It’s ‘profession’ with one f, though, so you’ll owe me an Orange Slush at Sonic. 😀

    Reply

  21. Winnipeger says:

    oh, poa…
    you’re such an angry, angry man.
    have a good life.

    Reply

  22. pauline says:

    Talk about a snowjob. . .did ayone see the C-Span interview of Kimberley Strassel last night? She was shooting down both sides of the moneyhungry deceitful aisle while she exposed Congress with uncovering their new sneaky ways of funding their favorite “bridges to nowhere”.
    Here’s her week old printed story —
    It’s a Tough Life
    The secret new way of earmarks.
    BY KIMBERLEY A. STRASSEL
    Friday, February 9, 2007 12:01 a.m.
    This budget week, there was one thing on which Democrats and Republicans agreed: It’s time to do something about earmarks. And in a nod to voter disapproval with these special-interest projects, this year Congress will do its pork spending in secret.
    Welcome to Congress’s new and dirtier earmark game, in which the big spenders are setting all the rules. In front of the cameras, both parties claim to have found earmark religion, and are talking up a bill that would reform the way Congress asks for billions in goodies for lawmakers’ home districts. Behind the scenes, they’re working feverishly to keep the earmarks rolling, this time using a technique outside of the legislative process and hidden from public view.
    The gears on this new underground earmarking machine started whirring late last year, when Republicans failed in a lame-duck session to pass the 2007 spending bills. The GOP pork crowd wanted to use its last weeks in power to push through 12,000 more bridges to nowhere. Saner heads noted that the party had just lost an election in part due to these corrupting payoffs and urged restraint. The standoff resulted in Republicans punting the 2007 spending responsibility to the Democrats.
    That put the new House appropriations chief, Wisconsin’s David Obey–a spender for our time–in the distasteful position of having to live up to his party’s election promises to fix the earmark boondoggle. He begrudgingly promised a “moratorium.” And last week, when Mr. Obey celebrated the passage of his $464 billion 2007 spending bill, he bragged that Democrats had fulfilled their promise and “stripped all earmarks from the measure.”
    “This decision doesn’t come without pain,” intoned Mr. Obey. “Many worthwhile earmarks are not funded in this measure, but we had to take this step to clear the decks, clean up the process and start over.”
    The key language here is “not funded in this measure,” and it explains why Mr. Obey is still smiling through his pain. Congressional members, led by appropriators and an army of staff, have already figured out a new way to keep their favors in the money, and it might as well be called 1-800-EARMARKS (which unfortunately is already taken). All across Washington, members are at this moment phoning budget officers at federal agencies–Interior, Defense, HUD, you name it–privately demanding that earmarks in previous legislation be fully renewed again this year. There might not be a single official earmark in the 2007 spending bill, but thousands are in the works all the same.
    And getting far less scrutiny than before–if that’s even possible. Under this new regime, members don’t even have to go to the trouble of slipping an earmark into a committee report, where it might later (once the voting is over) come in for criticism. All the profligates need now to keep the money flowing is a quiet office and a cellphone.
    Despite a congressional desire to keep this quiet, the evidence of marathon dialing is mounting. Lobbyists, thrilled their clients are still getting earmark handouts, are now publicly crowing about this underground program. Sens. John McCain and Tom Coburn–anti-earmark warriors–sent a letter to the Department of Energy last week wanting to know how that agency was handling the demands. On the same day, DOE chief of staff Jeffrey Kupfer delivered an internal memo to agency officers acknowledging that “offices have begun to receive requests from some Congressional offices, asking that the Department continue to fund programs or activities that received earmarked funds in prior years,” and laying out a procedure for handling such orders.
    The big question now is how aggressively the Bush administration intends to respond to this latest earmark insult. The president has made earmarks a priority, calling in his State of the Union for Congress to cut these special projects in half, and also for a more transparent process in which all earmarks are analyzed and debated. In a Manassas, Va., speech this week, President Bush complained again about how shady earmarks are, and referred to a stack of congressional committee reports (a favorite place for legislators to hide their pork) to make his point.
    But by today’s secret telephone standards, even conference reports look fulsome. This new practice also brings the added complication that the administration’s own agencies could be complicit in this underground funding. Agency staffs understand they are dependent on Congress for funding, and that the 2008 budget process is now underway. Thumbing their noses at appropriators is an invitation for retribution. Which is why one appropriations lobbyist was gleefully quoted this week as noting that congressional calls were so far being answered by agencies wholly in “the affirmative.”
    The administration has taken some steps to follow up on its earmark demands. In January, Office of Management and Budget Director Rob Portman sent a memo to every department and agency announcing new earmark requirements. From now on, the government will be required to identify and catalog earmarks in most spending bills, including earmarks hidden in committee reports. The memo also provided agencies with a tight definition of just what counts as an earmark, to make it harder for Congress to disguise its pork under another name.
    That’s useful for upcoming spending debates, but it doesn’t shut down the current dial-a-thon. In last week’s Energy Department memo, Mr. Kupfer noted that Mr. Obey’s 2007 spending bill does not include earmarks, and that the agency is also not legally bound to honor prior projects. He directs the staff to carefully review any requests to renew earmarks and then decrees that “only those with meritorious proposals or programs that effectively support and advance the Department’s missions and objectives . . . should receive FY 2007 funding.” This is probably easier said than done, but it’s a start. No word yet if other agencies are following suit.
    If President Bush is serious about earmark reform, it would seem clear he’s going to have to shame legislators into better behavior. This latest escapade shows how determined some in Congress are to keep their pork in place, regardless of what they tell the public. It’s time to blow the whistle on those who would preach an earmark “moratorium” on the one hand, while reaching for the speed-dial with the other.
    Ms. Strassel is a member of The Wall Street Journal’s editorial board, based in Washington. Her column appears Fridays.

    Reply

  23. ET Household says:

    Steve,
    Thanks for the beautiful pix.

    Reply

  24. Milo Johnson says:

    Mmmm, Weimaraner burritos!

    Reply

  25. gregariousred says:

    Hey Steve,
    Great puppy pics! I would like to know what kind of camera you use and on which setting you took the pictures, because they are nicely done!

    Reply

  26. liz says:

    Just yesterday I sat and thought, It’s time for Steve to share some new “baby” pics. I so enjoy seeing your pups Steve! They are beautiful and isn’t that puppy growing?????
    Thanks for the stress break……..

    Reply

  27. blonde says:

    yet another online party I crashed with personal insults flying around…trademark blogging feature I must say.
    backreading until further notice.

    Reply

  28. Pissed Off American says:

    winnepeger…..
    You childishly attacked my age and my proffession. You have lied on more than one occassion here, and even admitted to an attempt to foist a deception upon this blog, (although you only owned up to ONE such occassion when in fact there have been many). You have accused a number of us here, including me, of bigotry and anti-semitism. And you have on more than one occassion shown a willingness to run sniveling and whining to Steve about the fruits of your own ability to offend and alienate 90% of the posters here.
    I am not angry with you, Winnipeger. I am sick of you, and I find you loathsome and unworthy of my anger, my respect, or any civility. Do not mistake my disgust for anger.
    Drop it. My suggestion to you is refrain from addressing me directly, and understand that your pretensions and posturing carry no weight in modifying my opinion of you. I have seen all I need to see to draw obvious and accurate conclusions as to the nature of your character, (or lack of).
    I hope you will have the common sense, if not the self-esteem, to stop casting your irritating horseshit in my direction.
    And in closing, I too once posted as to the wonderful effect that animals had in providing richness and peace to my existence. And you rubbed it in my face, and used my comment as an opportunity to insult me. So drop the “cute little puppy” charade, it doesn’t sell.
    Just leave me alone and go natter at someone else, OK?

    Reply

  29. Uppity Gal says:

    Wow! When I was last up in DC visitng my beloved family, my fav cuz and I went out (must have been Jan. anti-inauguaration time) to a beautiful park with his dog, Lucky. I *think* it was the park in Greenbelt Lake. It was a two day snow storm hitting DC area, but in PG County, the snow came down (not like this,right now I know, but apparently, more than they are used to).
    I have FOND memories of this loop around the lake, through existing snow, as more came down, with a happy dog romping along and us booking it, and at times struggling to keep up (hey! wait for me!) :o) For a Miami-born girl it was a delight!
    I also have great photos! Thanks for sharing Steve!
    (lurking forever, occasionally commenting – many moons ago…)
    Uppity Gal

    Reply

  30. Winnipeger says:

    after reading poa’s comment above, i’m not so sure about that, jerome. some people can’t let the anger go.

    Reply

  31. Jerome Gaskins says:

    pups can bring world peace, if given a chance…

    Reply

  32. Pissed Off American says:

    “what were you doing in north idaho, poa? is that where you grew up?”
    Posted by Winnipeger
    Winnipeger, I made the mistake of directly exposing personal information about myself to you once. Considering the manner in which you abused that confidence, its not a mistake I will make again. You are well aware of my opinion of you, and it is not apt to change by your pretentious attempts at small talk. I have no desire to exchange pleasantries with you, and I will continue to expose and comment on your pretensions, your hypocricy, and your troll-like behaviour when the occassion arises.
    So drop the fake olive branch, because I know a briar sprig when I see one.

    Reply

  33. Pissed Off American says:

    Steve, when the weather is nice, its paradise. But don’t blink.
    When I was growing up, my dad was a partner in the Selway Lodge, smack dab in the middle of the Selway Bitterroot Federal Wilderness area. We had 9.9 acres right on the Selway river. You had to fly in, or horseback ride. It was against federal law to have motorized vehicles, or even a chain saw, off of our 9.9 acres.
    I got to see the salmon and steelhead runs as our pioneers saw them, with thousands of fish swimming upstream. It was the end of a time that will never return. Whenever I count my blessings, the time I spent in the Selway is at the top of my list.
    But the seventeen years I spent in N.Idaho came much later, in my twenties and thirties. Its beautiful and bountiful, but I do not miss it. The winters are simply too long, and too harsh.

    Reply

  34. Winnipeger says:

    what were you doing in north idaho, poa? is that where you grew up?

    Reply

  35. Steve Clemons says:

    POA…North Idaho? Wow. I am a nutty fisherman — and need to get there some day…when it’s warm.
    I’ll have to consult you some time,
    steve

    Reply

  36. Pissed Off American says:

    After having had spent seventeen years in North Idaho, I cringe every time I see snow like that. The area I live now has winter snows that are perfect, very rarely staying on the ground for over a week. Here, the snow stays just long enough to outlive the sentence, “Gee, isn’t that pretty.”

    Reply

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