C-Span Alert for Insomniacs

-

clemons jane mayer.jpg
My discussion today with New Yorker correspondent Jane Mayer on her new book, The Dark Side: The Inside Story of How The War on Terror Turned into a War on American Ideals, is one hour and eight minutes long and will air at 2:52 am EST this morning (Wednesday) on C-Span 2.
To track other times for this showing, here is a good link.
And then at 4:11 am today, my meeting last August with blogger and Middle East expert Juan Cole on “Napoleon’s Egypt: Invading the Middle East” is also being re-aired on C-Span 3.
You could make it an all night, double feature!
— Steve Clemons

Comments

32 comments on “C-Span Alert for Insomniacs

  1. David says:

    I don’t know if they can pull it off, but just the fact that it has to be taken into consideration is appalling. And there appears to be nothing the Imperial Dick won’t do. And one need only remember the attempt by reactionaries to foster a military coup against FDR. Until I read that in what I think was a credible source, I would not have been able to imagine it. I don’t think Smedley Butler made that story up.
    While I don’t pray, I have no objection to earnest prayers of the sort you mentioned.
    Ne illegitimi non carborundum.

    Reply

  2. Kathleen says:

    David… I’m praying you are right about Obama and that we’ll actually have another election…I just don’t see the Dynamic Duo giving up all that power willingly.. I see rather another ‘terrorist ‘event’ and Martial Law…. but you’re right, giving up is not an option, which is why I coninue to press for impeachment of Dopey and Darth before the Republic is dead once and for all.

    Reply

  3. David says:

    Kathleen,
    As disturbed as I am by both the so-called Patriot Act and the banana-republic autocratic behavior of this administration, including the attempt to do away with habeas corpus and any meaninful FISA oversight, I will have to wait until next year and the new president and new congress to determine what is actually unfolding. I think Obama really will subject all executive orders to Constitutional review, that he will restore the Constitution and its checks and balances to their primacy in relation to the executive branch, and that he will use surveillance powers responsibly and with respect for the Bill of Rights. That is who he has always been, and that is who he will be as president, and if John Edwards is the attorney general, I am sure of it.
    If John McCain were to become 44, the Constitution will once again not matter, and we will charge ahead full speed to our militaristic imperialistic demise. Hyperbole? God, I hope so.
    And let me add that if the American public rewards the behavior of the Republicans for the past 7+ years with the White House, the Democratic leadership will fold on most everything because of the terribly misguided message sent by the voters. I personally will probably write off the possibility of America ever coming to its senses. I’ll keep fighting, because giving up is not an option, but it will not be because of any faith in American voters or majority enlightened engagement with overarching realities.
    It will simply be because maybe next time, blind-assed luck will smile on the candidate who is more enlightened, more capable, and more truly worthy of the mantle of the presidency, as it did in 1932. Bush certainly was not – not ever – nor is the current incarnation of John McCain.

    Reply

  4. Kathleen says:

    Speaking of alerts, here is the Cato Institute on the new FISA bill. http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=9530

    Reply

  5. pauline says:

    Wikpedia states (so it must be true, right?)
    “The Hippocratic Oath, a seminal document on the ethics of medical practice, was attributed to Hippocrates in antiquity. This is probably the most famous document of the Hippocratic Corpus. Recently the authenticity of the document has come under scrutiny. While the Oath is rarely used in its original form today, it serves as a foundation for other, similar oaths and laws that define good medical practice and morals. Such derivatives are regularly taken today by medical graduates about to enter medical practice.”
    No notes on abortion though. . .

    Reply

  6. Kathleen says:

    I suppose they eliminated any reference to god(s) and godesses, too? It is interesting that they specified the particular procedure of abortion and the method, without regard to saving the mother’s life.

    Reply

  7. pauline says:

    Kathleen:
    I posted the classical oath, so what you read is what it was.
    The oath was “modernized” 30 years ago and the words changed so “aborton” is no longer listed.
    Convenient? Still ethical? I suppose it depends on which side of the issue you’re on.
    Hey, but I’m not big supporter of euthanasia either.

    Reply

  8. Kathleen says:

    I guess not…. I didn’t know the Oath included a prohibition on performing abortions, with no mention of saving the woman’s life and excluded coming to the aid of someone “under the stone”. Perhaps the oath needs an updating? Certainly those practicing torture are not “Christians” in good standing.

    Reply

  9. pauline says:

    Kathleen:
    At least physicians rely on the Hippocratic
    Oath. Psychologists apparently condone deleterious, mischievous and pernicious
    behavior among their own.
    “I swear by Apollo the physician, and Aesculapius, and Health, and All-heal, and all the gods and goddesses, that, according to my ability and judgment, I will keep this Oath and this stipulation to reckon him who taught me this Art equally dear to me as my parents, to share my substance with him, and relieve his necessities if required; to look upon his offspring in the same footing as my own brothers, and to teach them this art, if they shall wish to learn it, without fee or stipulation; and that by precept, lecture, and every other mode of instruction, I will impart a knowledge of the Art to my own sons, and those of my teachers, and to disciples bound by a stipulation and oath according to the law of medicine, but to none others.
    I will follow that system of regimen which, according to my ability and judgment, I consider for the benefit of my patients, and abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous. I will give no deadly medicine to any one if asked, nor suggest any such counsel; and in like manner I will not give to a woman a pessary to produce abortion. With purity and with holiness I will pass my life and practice my Art. I will not cut persons laboring under the stone, but will leave this to be done by men who are practitioners of this work. Into whatever houses I enter, I will go into them for the benefit of the sick, and will abstain from every voluntary act of mischief and corruption; and, further from the seduction of females or males, of freemen and slaves. Whatever, in connection with my professional practice or not, in connection with it, I see or hear, in the life of men, which ought not to be spoken of abroad, I will not divulge, as reckoning that all such should be kept secret. While I continue to keep this Oath unviolated, may it be granted to me to enjoy life and the practice of the art, respected by all men, in all times! But should I trespass and violate this Oath, may the reverse be my lot!”

    Reply

  10. Kathleen says:

    pauline.. have I told you lately how much I enjoy/learn from the links you post? My brain does not want to wrap itself around what it must be like to be someone who thinks torure is acceptable and can carry it out. Lord have mercy on all involved.

    Reply

  11. pauline says:

    “Seven years on, no answer from White House on anthrax attacks”
    07/16/2008 @ 2:28 pm
    Filed by Eric Brewer
    It’s been almost seven years since — in the weeks immediately following 9/11 — anthrax powder sent through the mail killed five people, threatened the lives of two Democratic senators, terrorized the entire nation, and helped prod a panicky Congress into passing the so-called Patriot Act.
    In the intervening years, not only has the killer remained free, but missteps in the investigation have had major negative consequences. Just last month, in fact, the Department of Justice agreed to pay $4.6 million to former bioweapons expert Stephen Hatfill to settle a lawsuit Hatfill brought against the Justice Department, the FBI, and former Attorney General John Ashcroft for destroying his reputation and career by publicly implicating him in the case. And Glenn Greenwald has pointed out that in 2001, ABC News was fed false information by several “well-placed sources” (presumably officials in the Bush administration) suggesting an Iraq-anthrax link. That imaginary link was widely cited by pro-war cheerleaders.
    At Monday’s White House briefing, I asked if President Bush was satisfied with the progress of the investigation into the attacks. Press Secretary Dana Perino told me that she didn’t even “know if he has had an update on it.”
    Here is our exchange:
    Q Is the president satisfied with the progress of the investigation into the anthrax attacks?
    MS. PERINO: I don’t know if he has had an update on it. But obviously this is something that the FBI is doing. We don’t do the investigation from the White House.
    Q Well, is he following the progress?
    MS. PERINO: You know, I’m sure he — he gets updated by Director Mueller once a week on a variety of issues. And if that comes up, I’m sure he gets an update.
    Q You don’t know if he’s satisfied with the progress?
    MS. PERINO: I don’t.
    One reason I thought the White House might need to be reminded of this issue is because as recently as last January, in his 2008 State of the Union address, the President appeared to have completely forgotten about the attacks, stating, “We are grateful that there has not been another attack on our soil since 9/11.” The anthrax letters, of course, were postmarked on September 18 and October 9, 2001, one to four weeks after 9/11. In his radio address to the nation on November 3, 2001, Bush called them “a second wave of terrorist attacks,” and promised that “we will solve these crimes, and we will punish those responsible.”
    But just a few months later, the White House was already stalling. Asked about the pace of the investigation on February 25, 2002, then-Press Secretary Ari Fleischer said, “The President would like to get this, obviously, resolved as quickly as is possible. The pace of justice is a methodical one…the President believes the FBI is doing a good, solid job.”
    The question didn’t come up again at a White House briefing until more than three years later, when a reporter asked Scott McClellan, “Why have we not found the person or persons responsible for the anthrax attacks of 2001?” Scott’s reply: “That’s a matter that remains a priority. It remains under investigation. The FBI continues to pursue it.”
    So it’s incredible that now, after three more years, all the White House spokesperson has to say is, “If that comes up, I’m sure he gets an update.” Not “he believes the FBI is doing a good job.” Not even “that matter remains a priority.” Just “if it comes up, he gets an update.”
    That’s simply unacceptable. Why isn’t THE PRESIDENT bringing it up? And almost as bad, why hasn’t the establishment media pressed the administration harder on this issue? Especially after this story by David Willman in the L.A. Times revealed that Justice Department officials kept the investigation focused on Hatfill for almost five years, even though investigators never found any evidence linking him to the attacks, and that many experts who have been involved in the case now believe that it will never be solved.
    When the Ramsey family was cleared in the JonBenet case, the media went wild. I can only suppose that one more Bush failure is no longer considered newsworthy.
    ****************
    The preceding article was a White House report from Eric Brewer, who will periodically attend White House press briefings for Raw Story. Brewer is also a contributor at BTC News. He was the first reporter to ask about the Downing Street memo and the Pentagon analysts scandal at White House briefings.
    http://rawstory.com/news/2008/Seven_years_on_no_answer_from_0716.html

    Reply

  12. Matt says:

    Steve, you’ve never seen “24” or Jack Bauer in action? Man, you gotta get with the program here… I can’t imagine how somebody like you would deal with that show.

    Reply

  13. pauline says:

    “. . .the team of psychologists who put together the palette of techniques. . .
    Back in ’06 I saw Alfred McCoy during his brief book tour for his “A Question of Torture: CIA Interrogation, from the Cold War to the War on Terror”.
    During the Q&A session, it was a member from the audience who revealed that he was aware that the AMA had refused to participate in such “techniques” studies and so the one group left to do this was “behavior” psychologists at select prominent universities nationwide where large fed grants were offered as an incentive to participate.
    The bottom line is I knew of one of these old dirty b*sterds through university friends and he was heavily rumored to have participated in these “torture technique” studies that were done before the first Gulf War. And he was formerly a department chairman of a psychology department at a very prominent public university! So much for ethics I guess!
    Can you imagine? Taxpayers’ money from a public university used to fly these slimy b*sterds around to plush “conferences” so they can share info on what torture techniques supposedly work the best — and then tie it into fed grant money to get grant-hungry universities to participate.
    McCoy’s general comments were that all the torture techniques used at gitmo, Abu Ghraib and the many rendition prisons unknown, DID NOT YIELD
    any terrorist future plans or really any reliable info. McCoy said the captives quickly learned to be-friend their torturers and tell them anything so the torture “techniques” would stop. Guilty or not guilty, those captives simply all tried to survive.
    Hmm. . .maybe taxpayers just need to cough up some more money so these psychologists can get more grant money for “torture technique” studies part II while they continue to live the good life.

    Reply

  14. Frank says:

    Maybe Nuremburg will not be made a mockery by this administration after all..Certainly the neocons involved will not visit Germany. Poor George, a prisoner in his own country.
    One positive spinoff of Mayers book is the justification of Cindy Sheehan’s attempt to replace “impeachment is off the table” Pelosi. Pelosi must be feeling the heat and may be the reason she loosened the reigns on Kucnich.

    Reply

  15. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Six Questions for Jane Mayer, Author of The Dark Side
    By Scott Horton
    In a series of gripping articles, Jane Mayer has chronicled the Bush Administration’s grim and furtive dealings with torture and has exposed both the individuals within the administration who “made it happen” (a group that starts with Vice President Cheney and his chief of staff, David Addington), the team of psychologists who put together the palette of techniques, and the Fox television program “24,” which was developed to help sell it to the American public. In a new book, The Dark Side, Mayer puts together the major conclusions from her articles and fills in a number of important gaps. Most significantly, we learn the details on the torture techniques and the drama behind the fierce and lingering struggle within the administration over torture, and we learn that many within the administration recognized the potential criminal accountability they faced over these torture tactics and moved frantically to protect themselves from possible future prosecution. I put six questions to Jane Mayer on the subject of her book, The Dark Side.
    continues…..
    http://harpers.org/archive/2008/07/hbc-90003234

    Reply

  16. Mr.Murder says:

    Steve, we should make you issue a correction.
    “Great link.”

    Reply

  17. bellesouth says:

    If you click the “good link” you can watch the great interview and discussion instantly.

    Reply

  18. Mr.Murder says:

    Actually, our own ideas have warred with the real side of American pragmatism.
    Salem, Native Genocide, Slavery, all hallmarks of America’s development at varied times.
    At least it could be argued that way, there’s enough evidence to suggest that thanks to gitmo, etc.

    Reply

  19. pauline says:

    Here’s a Stephen Payne video that shows him at his dirty dealings best.
    Everything is money/money/money for this corrupt cabal.
    http://www.mahalo.com/Stephen_Payne_Video

    Reply

  20. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Anyone else following the Payne thing? At every turn, we discover further abuses and grave corruption or ineptitude. Further, every turn exposes the astounding ineffectiveness and folly of this crock of absolute horseshit known as the “GWOT”, and its huge albotross, the “DHS”.
    One million, six hundred and sixty five thousand people on the terrorist watchlist. Think about it.
    A friend with a popular name ends up on the “no fly” list. Seems EVERYONE with that name ended up on the list. THOUSANDS upon THOUSANDS of people share that name. How did he get off it? He added a “JR” to the name he books under.
    Its a fuckin’ joke. On us.
    http://tpmmuckraker.talkingpointsmemo.com/
    Payne Forced To Quit Homeland Security Advisory Panel
    By Andrew Tilghman – July 16, 2008, 9:27AM
    Globetrotter Stephen Payne has left his post as a Department of Homeland Security adviser.
    The Department told him told him he could no longer serve on its top advisory committee. Publicly, the department didn’t say why, according to UPI:
    “The department asked him to step down” from his post on the Secure Borders and Open Doors Subcommittee of the Homeland Security Advisory Council, [Department spokeswoman Laura] Keehner said, declining to comment on the reasons.
    Payne was appointed to the committee last year, where he served along with government officials, academics and others from the private sector.
    Certainly his ouster had something to do with the video of Payne apparently offering to help a Kazakh politician arrange high-level meetings with Bush administration officials in exchange or large donations to the Bush presidential library fund.
    But there’s also Payne’s apparent claim that he “transformed” an Uzbeck man named Mohammad Salih from an “accused terrorist” to a “U.S. ally.”
    In a brochure from Payne’s firm, Worldwide Strategic Partners, the group claims that its work on behalf of Salih included:
    — Worked with the White House and the Department of State and Justice to facilitate the removal of Mr. Salih’s name from the terrorist watch list and the waving of the Interpol Warrant for his arrest
    — Worked with the White House, Department of State, Justice, Homeland Security and Treasury, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and key Congressional Leaders — to provide Mr. Salih with a U.S. Visa.
    We can see why that’s not really the kind of guy Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff would want advising him.

    Reply

  21. Mr.Murder says:

    The Dow Jones industrial average closed below 11000 for the first time since July 2006.
    It was 10,o79 when Dubya was speechifyin’
    I was saying it’s probably dip below 1080 while he speaking and when I got back in the room my relative viewing the market was aghast.
    He didn’t think the market was overvalued when I told him half a year back, and he didn’t think so the last holiday weekend when we talked.
    He’s shocked at the return on commodities since the time I told him should have considered a change for much of his portfolio. The peak oil factor is going to drive commodities sharply higher, though the returns will be challenged, their pricing will still reflect the peak valuation.
    The market ran pretty hard that direction over this brief span.
    “The Dow Jones Target Date IndexesSM, an index family made up of composite indexes representing three major asset classes: stocks, bonds and cash.”
    Think they might want to avoid Real Return indexes since they factor in real estate securities?
    Commodities withstanding that could get nukular.
    How can we take a 27 year inflation high, record oil prices, record foreclosures, and make some kind of normative claim to treading water? Change how we index, like we did the start of this year.
    Another lesson in fuzzy math, with a seventeen per cent drop this year, and we’re lower(trending down) than we were(trending up) when Clinton gave Dubya the car keys.
    Somebody should give Dubya, Bernake, the whole crew, a new set of diapers. Tip for your fund, buy order on diapers.

    Reply

  22. Mr.Murder says:

    Bernake bombed this week. He’s been stellar considering what he had to start with.
    Three banks have collapsed this year. The market put a limit on short orders.
    Are we ordering a McRecession Happy Meal?

    Reply

  23. Mr.Murder says:

    Posted by Steve Clemons Jul 15, 7:39AM
    “For the record, a few years ago John McCain told me in front of a gaggle of reporters that he was looking at The Washington Note on occasion because he had seen it more frequently quoted in National Journal’s “Hotline.” 😉
    best, steve clemons”
    Let’s hope this remains the case at this critical time, Steve. Honestly he has to get past a lot of thread comments that dwell on particular topics not germane to the title of said thread, as do most who would venture to read from the heart of civic function in your town.
    Such is the nature of American politics. You cannot remove people from their opinions, and it’s great that this forum remains open to better pulse the views of people in the world.
    There’s votes out there still and both sides know it. Where they’ve been damaged most is in trying to pander to one particular party wing and the resulting static.
    Obama is doing this to try and force McCain farther right, not in meeting him at the middle, though he isn’t doing it effectively in terms of his own party support. McCain has to rely upon prior party platforms for fund raising, due to procedural gaffes of his own camp the funding issue still looms. Fortunately he’s in an era of PAC, issue ads, 527s, and the RNC is more than willing to things so they infuse the process with new blood. After Bush hijacked the GOP’s soul for the last eight years, it could be said McCain represents a return to normalcy, and that’s pretty scary in its own right as he traditionally was able to play to base conservatives in his state without much concern from opposition.
    John McNormalcy. The balance for his campaign would come from his own fairly positive support among Hispanics in state. He turns out to have been a leader after all, and a lot of the other conservative Goldwater tacks that his initial days in office harnessed are now actually considered base positions of Democrats.
    International presence, budgetary restraint, personal liberties protection to the point of individualism, an ability to embrace coming social transition effectively. It’s why Hillary was a Goldwater Girl and her husband was the most effective Republican since Ike who helped pass fiscal restraint and reforms that few would have been able.
    Were McCain listening, he’d try and tag to Hillary since Obama is trying so hard to heal the gashing wounds he inflicted on the party.
    Say it wouldn’t happen? Well maybe a maverick would think otherwise. It would make him a plausible vote, and shield him from some attacks. this would be the same way Obama has tried to plausible position himself with Hagel. Calling artillery on your own turf is difficult, were they to go after McCain for getting to the center it could well result in burnback, and McCain isn’t very likely to go after Hagel in such a way to get at Obama.
    Privately John should remind the ‘we got ours’ crowd that they got theirs. Understanding this he can try and increase the power and influence by moderating some key items at least through the next election cycle. After that, one third of the incumbents can run on the issues in their own right as they deem fit, tacking from points of success, or against the opposite result with the classic reaction tactics.
    Keep in mind that the Hispanic vote is this country’s future. McCain can make progress there to a better degree than almost any Republican I’m aware of at this time.
    Let’s hear what he has to say in coming weeks. If all he does is stay where he’s been on all policy, then they can argue the guy is stuck in the past. He can be the maverick for the GOP that he wants to claim.

    Reply

  24. Mr.Murder says:

    Cole noted how long Iraq’s traditional Christian community existed and had deserved plural standing under Saddam.
    One of the world’s oldest’s Christian communities, would be the point to make about that fact.

    Reply

  25. DonS says:

    How vigorously will the active conspiracy to use (the “fear and anxiety of) 911, and to generate more fear and anxiety based on it to subvert the institutions of governance be followed? And who will follow?
    The Congress, the Dems complicitly, were more than passive victims. They were willing enablers of fear and anxiety and its consequences instead of standing up for the rule of law. This Congress will not do the soul searching?
    A “truth commission”? I dunno. It sounds too South African if you know what I mean. The US doesn’t do truth commissions; we’re the good guys with the white hats and John Q Sixpack would be unsupportive of sullying that (even as his economic well being is undermined by the fallout of criminal behavior).
    Finally, can we count on the nex adminstration, and specifically a President Obama, to pursue the truth, versus seek comity and move on. Obama gives the indications of a “uniter, not a divider” and despite apparent analytical ruthlessness, uses rather a soft glove. I don’t see the next administration acting to expose the loss of freedom and to restore it. Again, its not real American to acknowledge banana republic status.
    I’m afraid I need to see criminal prosecutions to thwart more crimnal beavor of politicians. But, as mentioned during the presentation, blanket preemtive pardons are likely.
    Anyone see any bright lights?

    Reply

  26. Mr.Murder says:

    Cole is on now. 🙂
    Thanks, New America Foundation.

    Reply

  27. Mr.Murder says:

    http://www.c-span.org/watch/cs_cspan_wm.asp?Cat=TV&Code=CS
    Guantanamo Bay and Interrogation Rules
    Going now on Cspan.

    Reply

  28. Mr.Murder says:

    Was trying to watch the cspan instead of cspan 2, it’s at audience questions w/you and hearings on the same topic at another.
    Shes discussing the tail number watching, the planspotters, we actually had planes doing ghost flights as a response.

    Reply

  29. Mr.Murder says:

    Oops, 2:15 CMT here.
    Janes’ interview was so fact laden, I was finding value in every word the two of you said down to the last 15 sec. of conversation.

    Reply

  30. Mr.Murder says:

    Steve, the web is showing Reps. speaking on the floot from earlier today on mine(real time).

    Reply

  31. Bravo says:

    Congratulations Steve. I am watching the Jane Mayer conversation this very moment on C-Span, and I have to say that it is the best discussion of this sort i have ever seen on C-Span. The way you are engaging her is superb and it’s so much better than a canned talk at the beginning. You clearly know your stuff Steve and you and Ms. Mayer have a great energy together.
    I hope C-Span looks at this and considers changing the format for many of the programs that they cover. This was refreshing. Just excellent. Learned a great deal (and am still watching).

    Reply

  32. Mr.Murder says:

    I’ll try loading another page, yahoo dumped its email format and I;’ve been reloading half this day.
    Missed this conference w/running errands as well.
    Thanks greatly for the archive. Your blog is a national treasure.

    Reply

Add your comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *