Cheney Plays Julius Caesar and Like Then Must be Stopped (Legally)

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cheney200.jpg
I have been arguing for years that Vice President Cheney had done more than any other single person in the government — including the President of the United States — to plant acolytes and followers of his throughout the national security bureaucracy. He has had spies and apparatchiks in the Departments of State and Defense, in the Directorate of National Intelligence, the National Security Agency and the CIA, and elsewhere in government.
John Bolton was one of these at the State Department, as was Robert Joseph — both of whom held the position of Under Secretary of State for International Security and Arms Control.
Finally, there is a breath-taking, disturbing four-part series in the Washington Post written by Barton Gellman and Jo Becker detailing the most outrageous usurpation of power that this nation has seen in decades, if not in its history. The series is on Cheney’s Rasputin abilities and methodologies and is titled “Angler,” the term the Secret Service uses to identify the Vice President.
Most outrageous is Cheney’s recent claim that his office is not in the Executive Branch and is not an agency of government that fits within the matrix of checks and balances that affect the presidency.
If that absurd assertion is allowed to stand, then the Office of Vice President must be de-funded by Congress immediately, and all powers related to the Vice President immediately made null.
If the Vice President thinks that there is no authority to which he reports, then he has committed a high crime against this nation and its democracy.
Every word of this long series should be absorbed. Some of what it reports is new and much not — but it provides important validation for what some writers — including those at this blog and others like Sidney Blumenthal have been describing for a very long time.
On January 7, 2007, I wrote a piece at The Washington Note arguing that long time Washington Post writer Bob Woodward had done the nation a great disservice in his book State of Denial by getting so much of the inside story on the Iraq War right — and then depicting Cheney as a relatively uninfluential, eccentric character.
I’m very pleased to see that the Post‘s own team has invalidated Woodward’s work with regard to the role and influence of this Office of the Vice President.
I would also like to direct readers to this TWN piece from a while back, “Can Cheney be His Own Declassification Machine?
It is clear now, in retrospect that Cheney has worked hard to write in the “Office of the Vice President” as a body with specific statutory authority that does not derive from the Presidency as his machinations on modifying Executive Orders on “Classified National Security Information.”
Republicans and Democrats in Congress should be unifying now on all fronts to immediately contain the power of Cheney and his team if they in fact do not feel that there are any controls on them that should be acknowledged.
Bush was never a Julius Caesar type. Cheney, however, is.
— Steve Clemons

Comments

66 comments on “Cheney Plays Julius Caesar and Like Then Must be Stopped (Legally)

  1. kotzabasis says:

    Is Steve with his prophetic insight seeing the approach of the Ides of March for Cheney? And will the last words of Cheney to Clemons will be, like Caesar’s, “Et tu, Brute”?

    Reply

  2. TokyoTom says:

    Congress has all the tools it needs at its disposal to act as a check on this Aministration – if it cares to use them.
    We need to keep the pressure on Congresscritters to stand up to the lies and lawlessness of this Administration.

    Reply

  3. Cyrus Mossaddegh says:

    If Americans can not keep their government accountable and within legal bounds maybe the time has come for the Iraqi people to file suit against the Bush Administration and Pentagon.
    We are all aware of the fact that crimes have been committed, so legal channels should exist for prosecuting those responsible. Compensation, imprisonment, and damages should be part of the settlement.
    And if the American people fail to assist the Iraqi people in prosecuting this criminal case then they are just wimpy accomplices that only know how to whine and point.
    (Steve, do you know if the Iraqi people have any American laws that they can use for taking legal action?)

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  4. Sandy says:

    What could BE more morally bankrupt than to say — back during Viet Nam wrt serving his country: “I had other priorities”? …and take five deferments.
    Other “priorities”?
    And then send young people to their deaths — nearly 3,600 — thousands of young people in the prime of their young lives — and thousands more maimed for life, physically and emotionally….and kill nearly a million Iraqi civilians….
    …and work towards/lobby to kill millions more in Iran…..
    …so your oil profits/holdings…..and your Halliburton/KBR stocks…..will help you and your family profit…..from all that death and destruction?
    He’s above the law all right. All laws–federal, state, local….moral.
    Our country has spineless bought-and-paid-for politicians. No Democrat — besides Kucinich — will do anything really meaningful to stop Cheney’s crimes.
    It will take some Europeans or others to bring charges and send him to The Hague to be tried for his WAR CRIMES.
    He is probably building somewhere next to Bush 43 on Paraguay where W bought up a bunch of land….just in case.

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  5. Kax says:

    I disagree that Cheney is like Julius Ceasar. One was a great warrior, the other is a giant chicken. Ceasar’s name lives on through millenia. Cheney’s name will fade away into the oblivion of failrues, 2nd in command to the worst President in history. Quite a legacy, huh? I’ll take Ceasar over Darth any day.

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  6. Arun says:

    This great line from John Dean:
    “It has long been apparent that Cheney’s genius is that he lets George W. Bush get out of bed every morning actually believing he is the President. ”

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  7. Arun says:

    Seems like Steve is coming to a rude awakening.

    Reply

  8. PoliticalCritic says:

    Cheney is a monster. He is the single greatest threat to democracy in the world.

    Reply

  9. Sandy says:

    And, I enjoyed this over at Counterpunch today:
    June 30 / July 1, 2007
    Keeper of Secrets
    Cheney Does the Constitution
    By CHRISTOPHER BRAUCHLI
    Although I am not normally one to spring to the defense of Dick Cheney I have to say that people are being really petty about the latest kerfuffle over his conduct. Mr. Cheney is not, after all, just any vice president. He was president of a big corporation before he picked himself to be Mr. Bush’s vice-president. He would not have made the switch from president of a big important company to a job described by John Nance Garner, one of its former occupants, as not worth more than a warm bucket of spit, unless he knew that the position he was accepting was more important than the job he was giving up. The reason it is more important is not just that he, being brighter than the president, sees himself as the real power behind the throne. It is because of the unique nature of the office of the vice-presidency as seen through Mr. Cheney’s constitutional eyes.
    Mr. Cheney and other constitutional scholars know that what makes the Constitution of the United State a special document is that it is a living document that changes with the times, even if some of the changes can only be effected by torturing its meaning. (Torture, as Mr. Cheney knows, can work miracles).
    According to Mr. Cheney’s interpretation of the Constitution, the vice-president is a member of the executive branch for purposes of being entitled to receive classified information that members of the legislative branch may not receive, but a member of the legislative branch when it comes to being accountable for what he does with that information. It is based on this creative interpretation of the Constitution that recent events unfolded.
    In mid-June it was disclosed that beginning in 2003, Mr. Cheney’s office had refused to comply with Executive Order 12958. In a very nice letter to Mr. Cheney, Henry Waxman, the chairman of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform explained to Mr. Cheney what that executive order was all about and to whom it applied. He explained to Mr. Cheney that: “Executive Order 12958 . . . directs the National Archives to oversee a uniform system for protecting classified information. A key component of the executive order directs the Information Security Oversight Office . . . to inspect . . . White House offices to ensure compliance with the security procedures required by the President.” The executive order applies to any “entity within the executive branch that comes into the possession of classified information.”
    Before receiving the letter Mr. Cheney had informed the Oversight Committee that he was not subject to that Order because he was not an entity within the executive branch of government because he breaks ties in the senate thus being more legislator than executive officer.
    Although some scholars might unfairly consider Mr. Cheney’s position palpable nonsense, Alberto Gonzales is not among them. In January J. William Leonard, the director of the oversight office wrote Mr. Gonzales asking him whether he thought the vice president was part of the executive branch of government. Mr. Gonzales has been studying the question for almost 6 months and has not yet been able to figure it out so it’s quite obvious that Mr. Cheney has put his finger on a fascinating constitutional issue.
    Aside from constitutional issues, a practical reason for non-compliance exists. During 2001 and 2002 when Mr. Cheney’s office was complying with the Executive Order, the inspectors did not discover that Mr. Cheney had a genuine spy on his payroll. Leandro Aragoncillo, an aide in Mr. Cheney’s office, was sending classified information to Phillipine legislators interested in overthrowing that country’s president. On May 4, 2006, he pled guilty to a number of counts involving espionage. At his hearing it was disclosed that during 2001 and 2002 he sent the legislators classified “situation Reports” and documents classified “Top Secret” and “Secret”. Mr. Cheney can quite properly point out that if the inspections were such a big deal the inspectors should have discovered his in-house spy. Mr. Aragoncillo was not the only leaker in Mr. Cheney’s office. I. Lewis Libby who was convicted of perjury also leaked classified information.
    In an effort to support the vice president’s claim of exemption from oversight Tony Fratto, a White House spokesman, said Mr. Bush considered the president’s and vice-president’s offices exempt from the executive order even though they would seem to both be White House offices, the term used in the executive order. Said Mr. Fratto: “This executive order was issued by the president and he knows what his intentions were.” That the words “White House” do not include the offices of either the president or the vice-president, said Mr. Fratto, is a conclusion that is arrived at by inference. He didn’t say what kind of inference. That’s probably classified. (On June 27 the White House abandoned Mr. Cheney’s argument that he was not part of the executive branch. Someone should let Mr. Gonzales know so he doesn’t spend any more time wondering about that.)
    Christopher Brauchli is a lawyer in Boulder, Colorado. He can be reached at: Brauchli.56@post.harvard.edu.

    Reply

  10. Sandy says:

    We have heard from the beginning that Cheney is our real president — he’s the one who has really been running the show.
    And, you know, when you read things like these….you do have to wonder. I know lots of people say Bush isn’t dumb. Really?
    http://tinyurl.com/2jn6rt
    “In Israel, Bush said, ‘terrorists have taken innocent human life for years in suicide attacks. The difference is that Israel is a functioning democracy and it’s not prevented from carrying out its responsibilities. And that’s a good indicator of success that we’re looking for in Iraq.'”

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  11. WhatBillOfRights says:

    Project to impeach Cheney NOW (includes steps we as individuals can take) from AfterDowningStreet.org
    http://www.afterdowningstreet.org/cheney
    I would suggest that everyone who is concerned about this madman check out the site and then take action to force congress to impeach him.

    Reply

  12. Carroll says:

    Groups call on U.S. to press Israel on cluster data
    E-mail News Brief
    Tell the Editors
    Thirty-three organizations are calling on the U.S. to obtain site information on Israel’s cluster bomb strikes against Lebanon last summer.
    In a letter sent this week to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice by the American Task Force for Lebanon, the 33 organizations, including the Jewish Voice for Peace, ask the U.S. government to make clearing “bomblets” a priority, press Israel for exact locations of cluster bomb drops and call for an international treaty governing cluster weapons.
    A reported 32 fatalities and 207 injuries have occurred since the end of the Hezbollah-Lebanon war in August 2006. Of the estimated one million unexploded cluster munitions on Lebanese ground only 112,872 have been cleared as of May 24.
    “Our primary concern is to expedite remeditation of cluster bomb sites and to ensure the safety of the brave de-mining teams in the field,” said ATFL Executive Director Dr. George Cody.
    Other signatories include offices of the Episcopalian, Friends, Mennonite and Lutheran churches
    Senate considers cluster bombs restrictions
    E-mail News Brief
    Tell the Editors
    The U.S. Senate version of a foreign operations appropriations bill restricts the sale of cluster munitions.
    The version still under consideration by the Senate’s Appropriations Committee bans the sale of munitions that have less than a 99 percent chance of immediate explosion and bans the sale of the bombs, which scatter shrapnel over a wide are, to clients that do not pledge to not use it in areas “where civilians are known to be present or in areas normally inhabited by civilians.”
    The bill is likely to be referred to the full Senate sometime next week and includes $2.44 billion appropriated for Israel by the U.S. House of Representatives last week.
    The language reflects concern over the cluster munitions left behind by Israel in Lebanon during last summer’s war against Hezbollah in Lebanon. Bombs that exploded after the war killed at least 20 people.
    A standalone bill with similar restrictions, sponsored last year by Sen. Diane Feinstein (D-Calif.), who is Jewish, was defeated, reportedly after strong lobbying against by the American Israel Public Affairs Committee.
    >>>>>>>>>
    Let us see who in the Senate tries to remove this restriction.

    Reply

  13. Carroll says:

    On Roseanne Barr’s blog
    June 28, 2007
    IMPEACH….
    IMPEACH THE PRESIDENT AND THE VICE PRESIDENT, THEY ARE TRAITORS TO AMERICA, AND SO ARE ALL OF THEIR SUPPORTERS. IMPEACH! ANYONE IN CONGRESS WHO REFUSES TO SAVE OUR UNION FROM THESE TRAITORS BY DOING NOTHING NEEDS TO BE RECALLED. SAVE OUR TROOPS!!! SAVE OUR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS AND JOBS. FEED OUR HUNGRY AND POOR! SAVE THE DROWNING PEOPLE IN NEW ORLEANS! ANYONE WHO MENTIONS PARIS HILTON ONE MORE TIME MUST DIE!
    >>>>>>>>>>>
    Rosie for President? She just might be able to straighten out Washington.

    Reply

  14. Sandy says:

    Glad you brought this to our attention, POA. Absolutely never.
    I will NOT vote for such fraud! How OUTRAGEOUS!!! He is HELPING Bush-Cheney…..to cover for them! Good Grief!
    No one to vote for. No one.
    I just wonder — if it could all go to Hell so quickly….in just a few years….maybe we fooled ourselves that there was ever really a “there” there with any of them in the first place.

    Reply

  15. Carroll says:

    Posted by PissedOffAmerican at June 29, 2007 09:20 PM
    >>>>>>>>>>>
    I told you, the dems will do Nothing to unhold the law or the constitution …there is no law or constitution any longer there are just two parties and all they will “investigate” is whatever nitpicking shit gives one an edge over the other….
    You will never see the liars of this war investigated…or 911 really investigated…or any high officals investigated for torture….
    They want Bush and Cheney to stay in office until the elections …so they will win the next election.
    It’s all about them honey…you know that. ..government of, by and for the people is over.
    I still have no one to vote for and I imagine 70% of the country feels the same way.

    Reply

  16. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “I think you reserve impeachment for grave, grave breeches, and intentional breeches of the president’s authority,” he said.
    What the hell does this asshole think has been happening these last six years? So, does this mean this damned media created fraud thinks he can become President and engage in the level of executive abuse that this Administration has, without fear of being held accountable? “Grave breeches, my ass”. This gives us a pretty good indication of what standards of behaviour Obama will adhere to in office, doesn’t it?
    This pisses me off more than anything I’ve seen from these people. The single paragraph, above, should disqualify this asshole Obama from holding ANY office in government.
    Gads, this one REALLY got to me!

    Reply

  17. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Screw Barack Obama. My blood boiled when I read this. My years as a Democrat are OVER.
    Obama says despite shortcomings of Bush administration, impeachment is not acceptable
    The Associated PressPublished: June 28, 2007
    WASHINGTON: Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama laid out list of political shortcomings he sees in the Bush administration but said he opposes impeachment for either President George W. Bush or Vice President Dick Cheney.
    Obama said he would not back such a move, although he has been distressed by the “loose ethical standards, the secrecy and incompetence” of a “variety of characters” in the administration.
    “There’s a way to bring an end to those practices, you know: vote the bums out,” the presidential candidate said, without naming Bush or Cheney. “That’s how our system is designed.”
    continues at….
    http://tinyurl.com/2qwdan
    No, you cowardly piece of shit, thats NOT the way our system was designed. Our system was designed with checks and balances, and its YOUR JOB to represent us to the letter of the law. God help this country if you manage to slime your way into the Oval Office.

    Reply

  18. PissedOffAmerican says:

    “BTW, Colin Powell lied on Larry King Live last night.”
    I saw it too, and commented immediately. How long will the son of a bitch keep it up? “All the intelligence”, my ass.
    Alma’s balls are twice the size of Colin’s. At least she recognizes that Powell was used, and she isn’t afraid to say so.

    Reply

  19. Sandy says:

    When you read this:
    http://www.antiwar.com/engelhardt/?articleid=11214
     
    Quotable
    One reason the United States finds itself at the edge of a foreign policy disaster is its underinformed citizenry, a key weakness in democracy.
    – Stefan Halper and Jonathan Clarke
     
    June 29, 2007
    What Tenet Knew
    by Thomas Powers and Tom Engelhardt
    TomDispatch
    …..an excellent and detailed account of the run up to war on Iraq…….you can quickly see what these actors and liars are capable of.
    Just how far they will go.
    I highly recommend it.
    BTW, Colin Powell lied on Larry King Live last night.

    Reply

  20. Carroll says:

    http://www.ips.org/blog/jimlobe/?p=38#more-38
    Changes at the pentagon..in reading material….neo press being marginalized…may be a good sign….
    I don’t know how many remember but some time ago Steve made an unusual dire post about “not being hopeful”… a “scary post” departure from his usual pointing out what the realist side was accomplishing or trying to..
    Talking all little things going on, including Cheney. I think, hope, that enough people are now sufficently scared of the monesters that a move is afoot in different circles to back us out of this neo nightmare without actually bringing down the whole government.
    Although bringing down the “most” of this government is not a bad idea….just to be on the safe side.

    Reply

  21. Don Utter says:

    It is good to see Steve come down hard on Cheney. Too often it seems like Steve supports the views from inside the beltway.
    The material in the Cheney series isn’t new. What is new is the recent book by Al Gore that shows that the erosion of the foundations of our governmental system, namely in the assault on rationality.
    Follow that book up with Glenn Greenwald’s book released this week, “A Tragic Legecy.” It is insightful on many levels and builds on the theme of how the good/evil mindset underlies the right wing’s sense of doing good, and its inability to realize that they have done bad things.
    Bush and Cheney have done things that are illegal and unconstutional. Never forget that we are not out of the woods in stopping their destruction of our way of life.

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  22. Kax says:

    The decision to impeach should be made strictly based on the law, not on partisan considerations. Laws exist to be upheld, not ignored and scoffed. If Congress expects voters to respect the rule of law, they need to do what their oath of office requires; Protect our Constitution from those who hold it in contempt.
    I don’t want to hear any more mealy mouthed whining about it, if they expect me to take them seriously and participate in their elections. Otherwise, farce is not my thing. Impeach or find a day job yourself.

    Reply

  23. Kax says:

    The decision to impeach should be made strictly based on the law, not on partisan considerations. Laws exist to be upheld, not ignored and scoffed. If Congress expects voters to respect the rule of law, they need to do what their oath of office requires; Protect our Constitution from those who hold it in contempt.
    I don’t want to hear any more mealy mouthed whining about it, if they expect me to take them seriously and participate in their elections. Otherwise, farce is not my thing. Impeach or find a day job yourself.

    Reply

  24. Carroll says:

    My take on the grass roots opposition to immigration, at least on the right: people are so pissed at the war and the degredation of their own economic posistion vis a vis the fat cats; they’ll be damned if immigrants get a perceived fair shake while politicians aren’t addressing the issues they really care about. Get it!
    Posted by DonS at June 29, 2007 06:38 AM
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    You are absolutely right of course.
    Everywhere I go about my town, all the mail I get from friends in other parts of the country where anything political comes up, it always ends with…”Washington doesn’t represent Americans any more”.
    The public is mad over more than immigration but the fact that the immigration issue has “illegal” attached to it gave the public a clear opposition point and more grounds for protesting it because the politicans can’t squirm out of the “illegal” part. Other types of acting against the public are more convoluted and harder to protest because the politicans have put so much legistation into law to favor everyone but the public that the politicans can claim “it’s the law” or whatever for other trangressions they commit.
    Anyway the roar of “they don’t represent us” is getting louder and louder and louder.

    Reply

  25. MP says:

    POA writes: “Heres why MP is posting in opposition to Ron Paul……”
    Hardly.
    But it is true that Paul, as a Libertarian, would try to end taxation altogether or reduce it to a bare minimum, which would cut out government programs of all kinds…perhaps especially for the middle class and the poor. I quoted from his own Web site to this effect.
    Good-bye NIH. Good-bye universal health care. Good-bye aid to dependent families. Hello unbridled free enterprise.
    But notice what Paul is NOT saying. It upholds AIPAC’s right to lobby and influence legislation. He’s just against sending taxpayer dollars to Israel…and that’s mostly because he’s against levying taxes to begin with.
    Interestingly, if you actually read Clean Break, they were proposing the end of American aid to Israel as well. Not that Paul is a neo.

    Reply

  26. David N says:

    This is something I’ve written before, but I forget whether it was here or on another site.
    Someone in this thread mentioned that Dems don’t want to impeach Cheney because then the person named to replace him (and perhaps then Bush) would become much more powerful a candidate for President.
    The answer is simple, and therefore never discussed on the MSM.
    If — and this is a big if — the Democrats were to actually USE the power the electorate gave them, they would realize that the person named to replace Cheney has to be confirmed by votes in BOTH HOUSES OF CONGRESS. That means that they can have a say in who it is, and what the circumstances and conditions of the appointment are.
    Given the implications of this appointment, it can no longer be argued — though it will be — that Bush is due any deference whatsoever for his appointee. The Democrats can have a say, because this does have implications on the next election.
    So here:
    1: The idea that close associate with Bush and his regime will be an advantage in the next election is huey. ‘Nough said.
    2: Democrats can place two conditions on the nomination: it cannot be anyone who is running for the Republican nomination, nor who has expressed any interest in running. No Fred.
    3: When being confirmed, the Democrats must demand a firm, public commitment from the nominee that he/she will not run for president. Then, when the person does run, the Democrats can use that statement in their ads as an example of that person’s dishonesty. The media will repeat the RNC excuses, but repeated tapes of the person making the pledge on camera and under oath may have some impact, even in a presidential campaign. Even for a Republican, for which such behavior is standard.
    So, what are the objections to impeaching Cheney, then charging him with multiple comspiracy crimes, and seizing all his assets under RICO? Perhaps that we need to impeach Gonzales in order to have a functioning Justice Department?
    The rot is so deep, so extensive, than a little revolution now and then may at last be called for.

    Reply

  27. MP says:

    DonS writes: “My take on the grass roots opposition to immigration, at least on the right: people are so pissed at the war and the degredation of their own economic posistion vis a vis the fat cats; they’ll be damned if immigrants get a perceived fair shake while politicians aren’t addressing the issues they really care about. Get it!”
    Interesting take. I think you’re on to something there. Unfortunately, defeating the current bill just means we’re left with the status quo with no end in sight. it wasn’t a smart move.

    Reply

  28. David N says:

    Here we go, marching straight into the 1890’s.
    The one part of the series on Der Cheney that struck me was who one of his acolytes, Ed Lazar of the Council of Economic Advisers, was talking about how maaarvelous Der Cheney is. We then came to this passage:
    ‘Lazear, who is otherwise known as a fierce advocate for his views, said that he may argue a point with Cheney “for 10 minutes or so” but that in the end he is always convinced. “I can’t think of a time when I have thought I was right and the vice president was wrong.”‘
    Talk about drinking the Kool-Aid!!
    Such force and certainty is certainly frightening. What may be just as frightening is what’s really in Cheney’s Mosler safes. What information does he have in there on his rivals and acolytes that he can release if they displease him?
    What is really behind the refusal to impeach these criminals?
    My own, sad conclusion is that there is one answer. The politics and government of this country has been sold to corporate interests. As the SC decisions revealed, corporations now have more rights than do people. And they have no responsibilities.
    Mere people no longer count in this country.

    Reply

  29. erichwwk says:

    John H wrote:
    “I’m told by a person with personal knowledge that Arab countries look at the United States as a failed model of democracy, impeachment as a failed process. When they want to learn about building democratic institutions, they look to Europe.”
    Surely you don’t think of the US as a democracy???
    PoA is right. The German style authoritative government is FULLY in play, and what we have is a charade. Compare the two SCOTUS cases, in Bongs4Jesus, and the case of striking down the prohibition against thinly veiled attempts to disguise issue speech as non-candidacy.
    If you’re still puzzled, look how easy it was to restore the House Water and Energy Development Approriations Subcommittee cuts in building the highly illegal NEW nuclear weapons at LANL – PIT production and the RRW (the house vote was 321-121) by essentially DEMOCRATS (Dorgan and Bingaman, although Domenici takes/gets credit for it). So much for the rule of law, or the Democrats as a vehicle for opposing that.
    Seems everyone on this planet is fully aware we are not a Democracy except perhaps some Americans. How many have seen last years Cannes hit, and BBC 3 part series, “Power of Nightmares” in other than bootleg or internet form in THIS country?

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  30. WhatBillOfRights says:

    By eight votes the House refused to de-fund Cheney’s office, with 24 Dems joining all the Republicans except for Ron Paul and Walter Jones.
    Here’s the roll call vote:
    http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2007/roll596.xml
    Here’s an excellent article from Slate detailing the reasons to impeach Cheney:
    http://www.slate.com/id/2169292/
    (hat tip to antiwar.com for both)
    I say we call the offices of all the Dems who voted “Nay” and give them an example of our right to dissent, before that right is taken away permanently by Fuhrer Cheney and these spineless amoebas we call our congress.

    Reply

  31. DonS says:

    Turley gets it. He’s sane, and he believes in the law.
    How far down the road do we have to get before it is acknowledged that this era is worse than Watergate, much worse than Iran-Contra.
    The dems are writing their own obituaries in cowardice and irrelevance.
    The people are so far ahead of the politicians, and so angry.
    My take on the grass roots opposition to immigration, at least on the right: people are so pissed at the war and the degredation of their own economic posistion vis a vis the fat cats; they’ll be damned if immigrants get a perceived fair shake while politicians aren’t addressing the issues they really care about. Get it!

    Reply

  32. Alan says:

    Sadly, the Democrats seem unable to get their act together. Old Dingell (Member for General Motors) exemplifies all that is wrong with the old bulls. Maxine Waters is no better. So Congress cannot and will not do anything of significance. The inside Washington gang of thinksters and stenographers are no better. Cheney has run rings around them.
    Are we to believe that Cheney and about twenty strategically placed minions can manipulate the entire government bureaucracy? It sure looks like it.
    The trouble is that inside Washington there are two gangs: one in power and one out. Inevitably the current players will be out on their asses and into welcoming think tanks in Jan 2009. And the opposing thinksters will resume employment in real jobs.
    The dance continues.

    Reply

  33. steambomb says:

    To hell with impeachment. Charge them as normal citizens with the crimes against the FISA act. Period. Charge them. Select an independent prosecuter and put the bastards in jail for all their sycophants to see.

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  34. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Heres why MP is posting in opposition to Ron Paul……
    http://tinyurl.com/34s68p
    “The First Amendment grants all citizens the right to petition the U.S. government, and this applies to AIPAC as much as anyone else. However, I oppose certain lobbying groups having more of an undue influence than others, and since one of the main purposes of AIPAC is to lobby for generous taxpayer subsidies to Israel, that portion of their influence would end under my administration”—-Congressman Ron Paul

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  35. JonU says:

    I had my doubts about what TWN and Steve Clemons would do when the chips are down, and this thankfully dispells them.
    The chips are down. The Vice President of the United States has put himself and his office outside the law. Not even Nixon and his behaviour went to such extremes as Cheney has
    What each American does at a time of crisis such as this will decide our nation’s future. 9/11 has a long reach, and has put everyone and everything into stark relief.
    Are you for defending our republic against all enemies? Even those from within?

    Reply

  36. JohnSolomon says:

    You need to get this linked on Drudge so I know when our paper runs something like this.

    Reply

  37. RalphNader says:

    But all politicians are the same. Everyone does it. It doesn’t matter who you elect – Gore and Bush are indistinguishable.

    Reply

  38. WhatBillOfRights says:

    ETA: I have two rambunctious terriers -does anyone want them or should I just report the little pups to “Homeland Security” in the interest of keeping USRael Uber Alles safe from terriers?

    Reply

  39. WhatBillOfRights says:

    In case any fool was wondering as to Israel’s control of U.S. foreign policy, here’s an AP article from today, entitled:
    “Bush holds Israel up as a Model for Iraq”
    http://tinyurl.com/2l8gp2
    NEWPORT, R.I. – President Bush held up Israel as a model for defining success in Iraq, saying Thursday that the goal of the U.S. mission there is not eliminating attacks but enabling a democracy that can function despite continuing violence.
    (rest of the article at the link)
    That article says it all about the UsRael “War On Islam i.e., War on Terriers” 😉

    Reply

  40. liz says:

    Steve, thank you. Validation is a ” good thing”. But wait a minute if you think Cheney’s influence is only inside the beltway. He has perfused his legions into state governments as well. I am absolutely convinced of it and hold a right good amount of evidence of the same….
    The man is truly frightening. Is anyone ever gonna stop him??? He is apparantly worthy of some mental health evaluation and I actually say that with sadness and just a little respect.

    Reply

  41. Homer says:

    Speaking of Cheney, observe how he turned a blind eye to the Iraqi opposition groups (fundamentalist Shiites, e.g. al-Da’wa, the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq) in the 1990s and think about why the Iraqi Paliament vis-a-vis Maliki has been able to sustain a stiffened middle finger aimed squarely at Cheney’s fat bald head:
    1) Bush warns Iraq on chemical arms U.S. fears use of weapons against rebels. Chicago Tribune. March 10, 1991 [snip]
    Jawad al-Maliki of the Dawa Party said in Damascus, Syria, that mustard gas was used against protesters in al-Haleh, al-Kifil, Najaf and some areas of Basra, in southeastern Iraq.
    Precisely what is going on inside Iraq is difficult to determine since Western reporters have been expelled. Most information is coming from refugees and opposition leaders in Iran and Syria.
    Defense Secretary Dick Cheney described the situation as “volatile” but said it appears Hussein will be able to keep the unrest in check for now.
    The Iraqi leader is using his loyal Republican Guard to quell the
    rebellion.
    2) Iraq Warned on Using Gas. Newsday. March 10, 1991 [snip]
    An exiled Shiite Iraqi opposition figure, Jawad al-Maliki, said in
    Damascus that mustard gas had already been used to kill hundreds of rebellious civilians, mostly in southern Iraq. But Pentagon officials said they were skeptical.
    3) U.S. Feels Out Iran Groups Trying to Oust Iraqi Leader. Wall Street Journal. July 31, 1998 [snip]
    Hamad Al-Bayati, a Sciri representative in London, says his group doesn’t want U.S. funds, and, “We have doubts about the seriousness of the administration.”
    Dr. Al-Bayati, who met with Mr. Indyk last month in Washington, says the U.S. should crack down on Iraqi human-rights violations as hard as it cracks down on Iraq’s weapons programs.
    For example, he says, when two Shiite religious leaders were
    assassinated in southern Iraq, the U.S. was silent.
    A State Department official says the U.S. had prepared a condemnation, but the issue never came up in news briefings.
    4) Iraqi Shi’i Opposition Leader Visits Syria and Lebanon, Praises
    Kuwaiti Support BBC. February 27, 2000 [snip]
    Hakim, meanwhile, criticized the American plan to remove Saddam Husayn
    from power.
    “This plan is vague and lacks support to thefield issue,” he said.
    The plan, said Hakim, did not considerthe protection of the Iraqi
    people, the opposition operationsnor the field and practical issues.
    He said the Iraqi people were doing “a wide and active” operations but they were facing relentless oppression.
    “Among the obstacles facing the Iraqi people to remove their regime is the international position which does not care with the humanitarian side, oppression and the destruction of the weapons of mass destruction,” he said.
    Keywords: Iraq, President Saddam Hussein, Cheney, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, Jawad al-Maliki, Maliki, Da’wa, al-Dawa, Supreme Council of Islamic Revolution in Iraq, al-Haleh, al-Kifil, Najaf, Iraqi Shi’i

    Reply

  42. Sandy says:

    Yes, excellent (and the most important) point, Marky. Thank you.
    Just up:
    http://thinkprogress.org
    BUSH AND CHENEY’S WET DREAM IS BOMBING IRAN
    We need to GET ON WITH IT!!!! IMPEACHMENT of BOTH, that is.

    Reply

  43. Marky says:

    Jonathon Turley suggests that a criminal investigation of Bush for authorizing illegal wiretaps would circumvent the executive priviledge claims, since according to SCOTUS executive priviledge takes a back seat to criminal investigations.

    Reply

  44. Sandy says:

    http://tinyurl.com/2czxfr
    Legal expert: White House stonewalling may force Congress to charge PRESIDENT with criminal offenses
    David Edwards and Muriel Kane
    Published: Wednesday June 27, 2007
     
    “Keith Olbermann announced on Wednesday’s Countdown that the White House is refusing on grounds of executive privilege to honor Senate subpoenas and release documents relating to its warrantless wiretapping. In addition, Vice President Cheney’s chief of staff, David Addington, has sent a letter to Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) saying Cheney’s office will not comply with oversight by the National Archives because it is not “an agency.”
    Olbermann then turned to law professor Joanathan TURLEY, who agreed tentatively that the administration might move slowly enough to “run out the clock” on its time in office.
    “But there is one thing that might concern them about the court,” Turley said, “and that is, you know, for many years, since we first found out about this program,
    some of us have said that
    this was a clearly CRIMINAL ACT that the president called for. …
    If we’re right, not only did he order that crime, but it would be, in fact, an impeachable offense…”
    Meanwhile the Gutless Wonders who should be bringing impeachment charges are cowering under “the table” somewhere.
    Except for Dennis Kucinich, of course.
    The one they always mock.

    Reply

  45. john somer says:

    Doesn’t Pauline remember, when Readan was shot, Haig proclaiming “I’m in charge here” ?
    As far as Cheney;s “maffia” (or network, if you prefere a more PC word), why don’t you start a list of them, cross-checked and cross-referenced for use in January 2009 ?

    Reply

  46. Sandy says:

    Lots being buried at Arlington.
    WHY?

    Reply

  47. Carroll says:

    Getting rid of Cheney would be nice but let us not forget a total “Purge” is needed in the US…the neo’s are still spreading like a cancer thru every facet of our government.
    Thanks to Jim Lobe for keeping up with what they are up to:
    http://www.ips.org/blog/jimlobe/
    Neo-Cons Make Gains on the Public-Diplomacy Front
    June 24th, 2007
    As my colleague, Khodi Akhavi, points out today in an article entitled “Neo-Cons Spinning Hearts and Minds,” neo-conservatives are gaining greater control over the U.S. public diplomacy even as they have lost influence in other parts of the national-security bureaucracy. Jeffrey Gedmin, previously with head of the Aspen Institute’s Berlin office and before that a colleague of Richard Perle at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) has taken over Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, which now includes responsibility for Radio Farda, the U.S. government station that broadcasts to Iran, while the Wall Street Journal editorial page has succeeded in forcing out Larry Register, a 20-year veteran producer at CNN, as head of al-Hurra, the U.S. satellite television station that broadcasts to the Arab world.
    >>>>>>>
    Some of us noticed and pointed out long ago that one of the Israeli neo’s agendas has been to seperate the US from it’s long time traditional allies in Europe and make Israel the only and major US ally…an “Isrmeica” vrs. the rest of the world set up.
    Gedmin has been a major player in that effort.
    Hardly the kind of voice we want speaking for America to Europe or the ME.
    Are there ANY Americans left in Washington?

    Reply

  48. Carroll says:

    I have no idea what will happen on Cheney with the dems…or the repubs.
    I am hoping the repubs have now scared themselves enough with their runaway governing that they now see the edge of the cliff ..and hoping that the Cheney thing is in part an effort by “some” in DC to rid us of Iran cabal among others before it is too late.

    Reply

  49. sdemetri says:

    Cheney’s reaction, or lack thereof, to the collapse of the south tower was chilling. I don’t presume to know what exactly was going through his mind, but it is hard to imagine not having some sort of reaction:
    “”There was a groan in the room that I won’t forget, ever,” one witness said. “It seemed like one groan from everyone” — among them Rice; her deputy, Stephen J. Hadley; economic adviser Lawrence B. Lindsey; counselor Matalin; Cheney’s chief of staff, Libby; and the vice president’s wife.
    Cheney made no sound. “I remember turning my head and looking at the vice president, and his expression never changed,” said the witness, reading from a notebook of observations written that day. Cheney closed his eyes against the image for one long, slow blink.”

    Reply

  50. pauline says:

    Who would buy a used car from this guy?
    Who would go hunting?
    Who would believe him on the worst day in American history??
    “Former Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta answered questions from members of 9/11 Truth Seattle.org about his testimony before the 9/11 Commission report.
    Mineta says Vice President Cheney was “absolutely” already there when he arrived at approximately 9:25 a.m. in the PEOC (Presidential Emergency Operations Center) bunker on the morning of 9/11. Mineta seemed shocked to learn that the 9/11 Commission Report claimed Cheney had not arrived there until 9:58– after the Pentagon had been hit, a report that Mineta definitively contradicted.
    Norman Mineta revealed that Lynn Cheney was also in the PEOC bunker already at the time of his arrival, along with a number of other staff.”
    Mineta is on video testifying before the 9/11 Commission. Though it was omitted in their final report, he told Lee Hamilton:
    “During the time that the airplane was coming into the Pentagon, there was a young man who would come in and say to the Vice President…the plane is 50 miles out…the plane is 30 miles out….and when it got down to the plane is 10 miles out, the young man also said to the vice president “do the orders still stand?” And the Vice President turned and whipped his neck around and said “Of course the orders still stand, have you heard anything to the contrary!?
    Mineta confirmed his statements with reporters, saying “When I overheard something about ‘the orders still stand’ and so, what I thought of was that they had already made the decision to shoot something down.”
    Norman Mineta made it clear to reporters– who verified his quotes in written text alongside him– that Mineta was indeed talking about a stand down order not to shoot down hijacked aircraft headed for the Pentagon.
    http://www.jonesreport.com/articles/260607_mineta.html

    Reply

  51. DonS says:

    I just finished a gigantic tome on Caesar (by Adrian Goldsworty) after many late night struggles to stay awake reading.
    What struck me in reading about Caesar and the general intrigue in the roman political machine is just how closely their depravity parallels our situaiton today — and how no one really questioned it. It was just the system. Just the way they ran the republic, and the empire. Ruthlessness — all in the name of polity.
    I trust Steve, having lauched this long overdue broadside, will engage all his skills to influence and shape in the effort to retake the momentum from these slayers of democracy.
    I fear the long term consequences on the Supreme Court, placements throughout the bureaucracy, partnering with right wing extra-governmental organizations, media and the like, render this a gigantic undertaking. Unlike some above — and I have reverance for the way the system seems to right itself — I am not sanguine about a postive outcome.

    Reply

  52. WhatBillOfRights says:

    ’08 doesn’t seem that far away (well, actually it does to me) unless one considers the changes Bush and Cheney have made to posse comitatus, habeas corpus, and Bush’s proclamation that in the event of a very vaguely defined national emergency he would basically assume the role of dictator.
    Beyond that — what kind of change can we expect? Hillary Clinton, professional politician, carpet bagger and war-monger? Barack Obama, who is on-board for an attack on Iran? Fred Thompson, Reagan parte due and lobbyist par excellence? Rudy Guiliani, whose lies during his tenure as “America’s Mayor” will lead to thousands of deaths of denizens of lower Manhattan and first responders?
    Seriously, the Dems hold power and have done nothing with it except prop up the Cheney junta. Why should we expect less shilly-shallying from them should they remain in power?
    Democrats have a far less than stellar record in terms of starting and/or surging “military actions” and wars.
    While I doubt that Hillary or Obama would seize control of the government in the event of another “terrorist” attack, which makes them marginally better than the GOP candidates, they are both still in the vise grip of the Israel Lobby, and thus we can only expect more war (in the case of Iran with gas going to a few hundred dollars a barrel) and a devastated economy.
    And the saddest part is that relatively sane people who call themselves “Democrats” still aver that Nader led to Bush’s 2000 “victory” and they still don’t see that it’s one party, only with a different initial behind the congress person’s name.
    All I can say to the Dems is, “Be careful what you wish for.” Hillary is just as likely to “lead” us into WW III as Guiliani or Thompson, and that in the end, is all that matters, because it will be the end of America as we have lost it.

    Reply

  53. Michael says:

    Thanks, Steve.
    I share the concerns of JohnH and others and they rather beg a very serious series of questions: what’s being done at the moment to effectively deal with Cheney; what needs to be done in the future – immediate to long-term; and, what fires must be lit under which Congress-critter butts to make this happen, ASAP?
    I’ve seen Rahm Emanuel’s bid to cut off funding to the Veep’s office, but entertaining as the idea might be, there seems a whiff of the theatrical about it – ie, great idea, but it’ll just never happen, not in a million years, not even with a solid majority of the US electorate cheering them on. In fact, it seems a lot like much of the posturing I’ve seen coming out of this Democrat-controlled Congress of late. However much the alleged representatives of the people’s will decry the outrage that is this Bush-Cheney administration, ending our bid for global hegemony and removing its perpetrators from the stage before the final curtain is not an option. Perhaps the long-suffering Democrats enjoy wearing the white hats way too much to spoil the fun. Maybe they fear that if they uphold the rule of law, blind justice might just stumble upon their own transgressions at some unhappy future date.
    I honestly don’t know what Congress’s thinking is these days and too much of the time I really don’t want to know, for fear that it’s only more of the same. Every hope that flickers in the darkness seems just as quickly dashed. I do know that my faith in our way of government, in our Constitutional rights and our system of checks and balances, is waning and, if anything, is draining away at an accelerated pace since the 2006 elections. I find myself dreaming of the archetypical strong man coming to cleanse the Temple by force, preferably someone with no party affiliations whatsoever, and quite frankly such dreams scare the Hell out of me.

    Reply

  54. rty says:

    > If that absurd assertion is allowed to stand, then
    > the Office of Vice President must be de-funded by
    > Congress immediately, and all powers related to
    > the Vice President immediately made null.
    This assertion has been withdraw quickly, first by Addington in a letter to Kerry, then by anonymous people speaking for Cheney.
    http://www.tpmmuckraker.com/archives/003534.php
    http://www.tpmmuckraker.com/archives/003538.php
    But what powers would there be anyway? If he isn`t part of the executive, then he is a senator who gets an office in the white house and a lot of air force one rides. He just happens to get to talk to Bush in between lobbying low level feds to mess with energy inmates and water supplies. His power simply comes from the messed up way jobs are distributed in DC instead of, say, the constitution.
    An unelected powerbroker whose name was historically speaking on the Bush ticket. And since the point of elections isn`t to figure out who should be in power but mostly convincing a losing minority of voters who is… One can easily argue the bit where Bush is “elected” is a stretch. The US has sponsored colored revolutions after equally nontransparent elections. Except in say Kazakhstan where the chief happens to be a Cheney friend. Or Azerbaijan. Aziri`s in Iran get their revolutionary aid though.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/28/AR2006082801282.html
    http://harpers.org/archive/2007/06/hbc-90000389
    If Cheney is part of the executive then his job is clearly that of Alexander Korzhakov who managed access to Yeltsin. Something he could do from his position as… bodyguard. (Hey, the mighty wiki tell me he fought in Afghanistan… maybe the comparison isn’t that good after all)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korzhakov
    The point is, the random stranger with executive privilege and an office on the extreme right hand side of the white house is old news. When are us poor Kremlinologists gonna get our next fix of “republicans drop the war in time for election” or “GOP anti-Cheney coup” rumors?
    http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/archives/individual/2007_06/011575.php
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/25/AR2007062501038_pf.html
    This “I dislike Cheney too” stuff is to late to impress anyone who might give up something juicy anyway.

    Reply

  55. Linda says:

    I may not always agree with Steve, but I do on having faith in our Constitution and form of government to be flexible enough to survive and grow stronger and wiser, i.e., learn from Cheney-Bush mess. The strength (and weakness) of our government is that it allows for patience and time, even when we all wish that this administration would just go away.
    We don’t have good options for impeachment this late in a Presidency or Vice-Presidency. And getting rid of Cheney would only help some GOP presidential hopeful who might replace him. And with a parliamentary system, there could be too many abrupt changes in short periods of time.
    Right now we really need a new special prosecutor law–a better one–and other reforms. We got that after Watergate, then abused and allowed to expire a decade ago. The one hope I see is that whenever the pendulum swings too far one way, there is a correction eventually. I don’t mean to minimize the current disgusting at all and 11/08 seems very far away, but we will have a new President and Congress elected to change course.

    Reply

  56. Newsguy says:

    There must be some fundamental flaws in our system. The Constitution is a marvelous document, but the outrageous behavior of Bush and Cheney has produced no meaninful pushback. Clearly, Cheney needs to be impeached. His arrogance of power demands it. Yet, Pelosi came into office saying impeachment was “off the table.” Why? Presumably that includes Bush, who arguably is guilty of war crimes. If torture, secret prisons, warantless wiretaps and the seizure of an American citizen and holding him without trial isn’t an affront to our system, then what is? In a rational, working democracy, these people would be on trial.
    Bush shouldn’t have been “elected” in the first place. Election reform so elections can’t get stolen should be a major priority. Election reform so elections can’t get bought should be another top goal. And election reform should outlaw private voting machine firms holding the key to the vote count.
    After that, it should be easier for “we the people” to vomit up toads like Bush and Cheney out of the body politic.

    Reply

  57. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Sorry….
    My post should have read….
    “It is my opinion that HE is…..”

    Reply

  58. PissedOffAmerican says:

    al75………
    Please understand, I am, not “angry” at Steve. On the contrary, I think Steve is the victim of his own patriotism. It is my opinion that is is far too close to the inside, and tends to view the players by their obvious shared humanity, the reality of their presence, the odors, the sounds. Only by being on the outside, looking in, are we able to see the dislocation between thier world and ours, and separate their physical presence from the very real specter of the actual results of their actions.
    Steve has a faith founded in a bubble that very few of us ever enter. And unfortunately, as the old cliche goes, I think his bubble is about to be popped.

    Reply

  59. Eli Rabett says:

    Steve, you owe a lot of people an apology for covering for Bush, Cheney and co. The whole barrel is rotten.

    Reply

  60. Karen says:

    In a recent online q&a at the WaPo site, Gellman remarked that they didn’t print a lot of their information regarding Cheney. I’d sure like to read what they omitted. Any conjecture on what that material included?

    Reply

  61. JohnH says:

    I’m told by a person with personal knowledge that Arab countries look at the United States as a failed model of democracy, impeachment as a failed process. When they want to learn about building democratic institutions, they look to Europe.
    Interesting that people in Arab countries understand what Americans don’t. With Congress’ approval under 30% and the President’s around 30%, the government has simply stopped responding to the will of the people–and frankly they don’t care. Cheney is only the lightning rod and the most egregious example of a system gone amuck.
    In a democracy, there should be nothing easier than disposing of someone like Cheney who is viewed favorably by only 18% of the public. In a democracy…

    Reply

  62. Frank says:

    Kucinich who??
    The only one running for president who is trying to do something about this shame our nation is going through.
    So much for the MSM.

    Reply

  63. al75 says:

    I’m not as angry at Clemons as PissedOff.. is, but I have some of the same questions.
    I recognize Clemons is right about Woodward – but what’s Woodward’s angle this time? In his first two books, he “overlooked” the deceptions and political blackmail Bush/Cheney applied in the rush to war in 2002.
    In ‘State of Denial’, Woodward seemed to turn on his old friends. But Clemons is right, Woodward held back when it came to discussing Cheney’s omnipresent role.
    Who is Woodward covering for? What forces have led the ‘elite’ to support Cheney’s power-grab? As Tom Ricks pointed out in ‘Fiasco’, the failure of the Bush admin. was only possible due to systematic failures in Congress, the press, and upper-echelon military.
    Likewise, Cheney could not have done what we now can all see, without a great deal of cooperation, starting with Woodward’s but including hundreds or thousands of others. Can someone explain how this really works?

    Reply

  64. PissedOffAmerican says:

    Perhaps Steve is now realizing the ramifications of not holding these people accountable. We have used up six years of valuable time that saw one crime after another going unprosecuted and unpunished. Steve has steadfastly stood against impeachment, and repeatedly handed us posturing frauds represented as knights in shining armor, such as the accolades he gave to Reid for his Senate stunt, despite the fact that Reid accomplished absolutely nothing, and got the PR for the stunt, but the American people never got the report the stunt was touted as seeking. Meanwhile, Steve has ignored, for the most part, the efforts of those politicians that recognized the anti-constitutional machinations of this administration for what they were, and have advocated employing the checks and balances, even impeachment, for some time now. John Conyers comes to mind.
    Now, the President has announced he will not honor the Congressional subpoenas that have been issued in the AG scandal. And why would he? He has been shown for over six years now that political posturing and empty rhetoric is far more forthcoming from Congress than actual oversight is. Good God, the man has gotten away with murdering well over half a million people with lies and fearmongering, has engaged in the torture of vaguely defined enemies of the state, has dismantled fifty years of progress in environmental law, has spied on his citizens illegally and openly, has grossly failed his citizens in time of national disaster with his ongoing handling of the Katrina disaster, and is even now pursuing and instituting an immigration policy that the polls are indicating massive public dissatisfaction with. Even his very presence in the Oval Office was brought about by questionable election returns. All without prosecution, oversight, or accountability. Why in God’s name should we expect him, or this satanical monster Cheney, to respect or fear the actions of Congress at this juncture? He sees himself as being above the law. And why not? We have allowed him to be for over six years now.
    Now, we will have a long, expensive, and messy battle about constitutional law, as the abuses of power continue, the dying continues, 20 million illegals become citizens, the borders remain open, the civil war in Iraq escalates, and Cheney works behind the scenes to fabricate the next trifecta, enabling an attack on Iran.
    Don’t worry though, Harman’s got your back, so you needn’t worry about that red white and blue spinnaker on the horizon.

    Reply

  65. John Robert BEHRMAN says:

    Like Aaron BURR, CHENEY should have been IMPEACHED and CONVICTED some time ago. To be sure, that would be hard given the make-up and inclination of the Senate. And, I surely do not understand those as would IMPEACH, knowing that a CONVICTION is not possible.
    The unilateral measure the HOUSE Democrats can take is NOT AUTHORIZING and NOT APPROPRIATING funds for certain Titles and Sub-titles of the budget.
    Exercising not a vaguely “Congressional” and ill-defined “power of the purse” won’t do. That is a dodge that just degenerates into gestures revealing the cowardice and corruption of House Democrats, especially of the Majority Leader, Steny HOYER.
    No, it takes two steps, but the only usable constitutional power of Democrats in Congress is to not “originate” that which cannot be “conferenced” back in and, therefore, that which cannot be “filibustered” in the Senate or vetoed by the President.
    The GOP was on solid ground when it refused to negotiate or “deal” from its Congressional majority in both chambers, now — effectively — still in the Senate.
    But, the extension of “unitary” executive power by BUSH or assertion of a “divine right” by CHENEY are, well, “A World Turned Upside-Down” from 1789. Still, they are also an abdication of responsibility by the House Democrats.
    If they cannot use their majority again for anything but perks and pork, they already deserve to lose it, as they did in 1994.
    Moreover, the GOP is now marshalling its clowns, actors, and legal acrobats to drive them out of “control” of the House again, making fools of cowardly and corrupt Democrats who take an oath to “uphold the constitution”, evidently only if it is risk-free, convenient, and personally or professionall rewarding, unlike mere soldiers who take the same oath and die upholding it with plenty of pork but no perks, indeed, third-rate small-arms and no end of gold-plate where real armor should be.
    Larding your district and every bill reported out of a House/Senate mish-mash of self-indulgence is not providing “for the common defense”.
    We do not need sometime strict, sometime creative judicial activists on the bench — though that is what the “Federalists” have given us. What we need is constitutional literalists in the House instead of this rabble of cringing liberals and “Blue Dog” conservatives headed by the utterly dysfunctional “team” of PELOSI and HOYER.

    Reply

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