Busy Friday: C-Span to Cover Econ Conference & That “Michael Baroody Ad”

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Greetings folks — a lot going on today. First, by close of business today, we will know the broader character and substance of World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz’s defense. I will post on that this afternoon. I also have some comments about this Posada trial fiasco that will be up later today.
redfox3sm.jpgI addition, I like foxes. I have a healthy, happy, goodlooking red fox living in the woods down from me — but that “fox ad” that appears on my site just does terrible injustice to the fox population. I also think it is not an accurate reflection of Michael Baroody who the trial lawyers paying for that ad are going after. The ad is technically on my site — and I have allegedly been compensated for it — but I don’t agree with the substance of the ad and will explain why in a post about Baroody later. If you want a preview, just search under Baroody’s name on my site and you’ll see some of the reasons that I admire his character.
Finally, I have helped organize a major economic policy conference today titled: “Will the Economic Sky Fall? A National Policy Forum on the Future of the American and Global Economies” taking place in the Hart Senate Office Building, Room 902. It takes place from 10:45 am until 2:00 pm and lunch will be provided. It’s free and open to the public — if you tell them that you are “a guest of The Washington Note.”
I have organized this event which I will attach below with former Senator Bob Kerrey and the New School. If you click to “read more,” you can see the conference outline — and yes, it will be taped for C-Span.


The New America Foundation/American Strategy Program
in cooperation with The New School/Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis
cordially invite you and your colleagues to
WILL THE SKY FALL?
A NATIONAL POLICY FORUM
ON THE FUTURE OF THE AMERICAN AND GLOBAL ECONOMIES
FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2007
10:45 am – 2:00 pm
902 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC

All sessions will be moderated discussions. There will be no formal presentations.
RSVP to this email or to Communications@NewAmerica.net, or call 202-986-4901
10:45 am
REGISTRATION
OPENING REMARKS

STEVEN CLEMONS
Director, American Strategy Program
New America Foundation
THE HON. BOB KERREY
President, The New School
Former U.S. Senator (D-NE)
11:00 AM
IS THE ECONOMIC SKY FALLING?

DANIEL YERGIN
Chairman, Cambridge Energy Research Associates
Global Energy Analyst, NBC and CNBC
Pulitzer-Prize winning author, The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money and Power
THE HON. DOUGLAS HOLTZ-EAKIN
Director of Economic Policy, John McCain 2008
Former Director, Greenberg Center for Geoeconomic Studies, Council on Foreign Relations
Former Director, Congressional Budget Office
THE HON. JIM KOLBE
Former Member, U.S. House of Reprentatives (R-AZ)
Senior Transatlantic Fellow, German Marshall Fund
Strategic Consultant, Kissinger-McLarty Associates
MICHAEL MANDEL
Chief Economist, BusinessWeek
CLYDE V. PRESTOWITZ, JR.
President, Economic Strategy Institute
Author of Three Billion New Capitalists and Rogue Nation
JAMES K. GALBRAITH
Lloyd M. Bentsen Jr. Chair in Government/Business Relations
LBJ School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin
moderator
SEBASTIAN MALLABY
Economics Columnist, Washington Post
Paul. A. Volcker Senior Fellow for International Economics
Council on Foreign Relations
12:00 PM
SENATORIAL COLLOQUIUM
(lunch served)
WHAT POLICY BATTLES HAVE MATTERED? WHAT AREN’T WE GETTING RIGHT?

THE HON. DEBBIE STABENOW
U.S. Senator (D-MI)
THE HON. BOB BENNETT
U.S. Senator (R-UT)
THE HON. KENT CONRAD
Chairman, Committee on the Budget
U.S. Senate (D-ND)
moderator
THE HON. BOB KERREY
President, The New School
Former U.S. Senator (D-NE)

1:00 PM
DEBATING WHERE THE SKY IS AND WILL BE TOMORROW

STEVEN RATTNER
Managing Principal, Quadrangle Group LLC
Chairman, Educational Broadcasting Corporation
Former Deputy Chairman & Deputy CEO, Lazard Frères & Co. LLC
THE HON. MARTIN BAILY
Senior Fellow, Institute for International Economics
Senior Adviser, McKinsey & Co.
Former Chairman, Council of Economic Advisors
THE HON. LAURENCE H. MEYER
Former Deputy Governor, Federal Reserve Board
Distinguished Scholar, Center for Strategic & International Studies
BERNARD L. SCHWARTZ
Chairman & CEO, BLS Investments
Retired Chairman & CEO, Loral Space & Communications
THE HON. GRANT ALDONAS
Former Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade
Department of Commerce
and
Scholl Chair in International Business, CSIS
DEAN BAKER
Co-Director, Center for Economic & Policy Research
THE HON. GENE SPERLING
Former National Economic Adviser to the President
Director, Universal Education Project, Council on Foreign Relations
Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress
moderator
ZANNY MINTON BEDDOES
Chief Economics Correspondent, The Economist

2:00 PM
ADJOURNMENT

Comments

5 comments on “Busy Friday: C-Span to Cover Econ Conference & That “Michael Baroody Ad”

  1. David N says:

    This seems to be the one forum where I can offer my feedback to the “Sky Is Falling” forum.
    The best way to sum up what everyone said is this: The deficits are not an immediate crisis, but they are something that will one day be bad. The best way to deal with this and other issues, such as the projected shortfalls in Social Security and Medicare, is to deal with them now, introducing small, marginal changes that given time will have enough impact to take care of the problem.
    However, since a) it isn’t a crisis right now, and b) part of the solution is marginal tax increases for the rich, nothing will be done.
    Thus, the problems will be allowed to fester and get worse, until we are well and truly screwed. Our only real hope is that the corporate interests that own our political system realize that many of the changes (a universal, government-run health care system, for example) are in their interest as well as that of the country. They will then allow action to be taken that does not involve the slightest impact on their own wealth.
    Which will create its own crisis, at which point we will be, again, well and truly screwed, unless there are major reforms in the legal system that remove corporate interests from the political arena. Fat chance.

    Reply

  2. Eric says:

    Steve,
    We all know you like blogging what Larry Wilkerson has to say, so in the vein of CSPAN and discussions of criticism of Bush, check out this story about Larry Wilkerson discussing impeachment of Bush and Cheney.
    http://www.iraqslogger.com/index.php/post/2723/Former_Bush_Admin_Official_Speaks_Impeachment

    Reply

  3. liz says:

    I have a beautiful red fox living in my downtown Columbia SC neighborhood. Isn’t the UN ” rewilding ” America??

    Reply

  4. JohnH says:

    Whatever happens to Wolfowitz, he is likely to be remembered as the symbol of the time when the IMF and World Bank lost their stature. Europeans are threatening to reduce support:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/11/washington/11wolfowitz.html?hp
    Venezuela is quitting the organizations, and other potential victims are freeing themselves by paying off their loans early: http://www.fpif.org/fpiftxt/4200
    Helluva job, Wolfie!
    In fact, the countries running the world’s biggest deficits–historically a sure sign of the need for IMF intervention–are the Coalition of the Willing: USA, UK and Australia. But will the IMF intervene and force the US government to sell off strategic assets, like Colorado River dams, national parks and national forests to Chinese, Russian, and Saudi investors at fire sale prices? Probably not. The IMF cannot do unto itself what it did unto others. Instead, its importance, like that of its patrons, will simply wither away.
    Helluva job, Bush/Cheney!

    Reply

  5. Christine Brenner says:

    We are artists (landscape painters). It has been noticed by many of the artists trying to make a living in this culture and economy that most of the people who love and buy our work have a lot less money to spend (invariably buying smaller less expensive paintings), but more than ever appreciate the opportunity to buy something authentic. There are also a very few who have unlimited funds, we don’t descriminate. And we love spending our money locally at farmers markets and among Vermont producers, trying to create (in addition to art) a small contribution to our local economy.

    Reply

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